File 770

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File 770 is a long-running science fiction fanzine and newszine published by Mike Glyer; it is named after the now legendary party held in Room 770 at Nolacon, the 9th World Science Fiction Convention in New Orleans, Louisiana, that ran continuously for nearly two days and upstaged all the other events at that 1951 Worldcon.[1]

The publication has won the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine six times, in 1984,[2] 1985,[3] 1989,[4] 2000,[5] 2001,[6] and 2008.[7] File 770 is a frequent nominee in the category having made the final Hugo ballot in 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2009, and 2010 in addition to the years in which it was the winner.

File 770 remains a paper fanzine, appearing several times each year, though much of the content is also available via an eFanzines edition and also in the fannish side of the blogosphere on-line.

Glyer started the newszine in 1978 to report on fan clubs, conventions, fannish projects, fans, fanzines and sf awards, and to publish controversial articles.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cameron, Richard Graeme. "R: Room 770". The Canadian Fancyclopedia. British Columbia Science Fiction Association. Archived from the original on June 7, 2007. Retrieved September 8, 2010. "This was a St. Charles Hotel room registered to fans Max Keasler, Roger Sims, Rich Elsberry and Ed Kuss at the 9th Worldcon -- nicknamed NOLacon -- held in New Orleans in 1951. Frank Dietz had been hosting a room party which was asked to quiet down by a hotel detective, and Dietz resolved the matter by taking eveyone to room 770 circa 11:00 PM Saturday night, whereupon a massive party developed which lasted till 11:00 AM the next morning. [...] Time has transformed the room 770 party into an iconic fannish emblem, but the truth is it did have a pervasive impact on fandom right from the beginning, it was an instant legend in the making. [...] Room 770 played a part in the philosophy and orientation of a substantial part of fandom for years thereafter." So much so that Mike Glyer chose it as the title for his newszine, presumably because it strikes the right note of fannish fun. - Harry Warner, Jr." 
  2. ^ "1984 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  3. ^ "1985 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  4. ^ "1989 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  5. ^ "2000 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  6. ^ "2001 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  7. ^ "2008 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  8. ^ "Is Your Club Dead Yet?". File 770 (127). November 1998. 

External links[edit]