Financial District, Manhattan

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Financial District
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan
The Financial District of Lower Manhattan

The Financial District, also commonly referred to as FiDi,[1] located in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, is a neighborhood on the southeastern side of Manhattan which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the city's major financial institutions, including the New York Stock Exchange and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The World Trade Center was located in the neighborhood until the September 11 attacks, as is the building's successor. The neighborhood roughly overlaps the boundaries of the New Amsterdam settlement in the late 17th century. The Financial District has witnessed growth in its population to approximately 43,000 as of 2014, nearly double the 23,000 recorded at the 2000 Census.[2]

Description and history[edit]

As a district, it encompasses roughly the area south of City Hall Park but excluding Battery Park and Battery Park City. The heart of the Financial District is often considered to be the corner of Wall Street and Broad Street, both of which are contained entirely within the district.[3] The northeastern part of the financial district (along Fulton Street and John Street) was known in the early 20th century as the Insurance District, due to the large number of insurance companies who were either headquartered there, or maintained their New York offices there.

Federal Hall National Memorial, on the site of the first US Capitol and the inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States, is located at the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street.

Until the late 20th and early 21st century, the neighborhood was considered to be primarily a destination for daytime traders and office workers from around New York City and the surrounding areas. The neighborhood now has a growing number of full-time residents, with estimates made in 2010 showing that there were approximately 61,000 people living in the area, a jump from the 15 to 20 thousand living there before 2001,[4] with many buildings being converted from office space to apartments and condominiums during the 1990s and 2000s.

It has a number of tourist attractions such as the adjacent South Street Seaport Historic District, the New York City Police Museum, and Museum of American Finance. Bowling Green is the starting point of traditional ticker-tape parades on Broadway, where here it is also known as the Canyon of Heroes. The Museum of Jewish Heritage and the Skyscraper Museum are both in adjacent Battery Park City which is also home to the World Financial Center.

Although the term is sometimes used as a synonym for "Wall Street", the latter term is often applied metonymously to the financial markets as a whole (and is also a street in the district), whereas "the Financial District" implies an actual geographical location.

Tall buildings in the area[edit]

Name Image Height(m) Floors Year Notes
One World Trade Center One World Trade Center cropped2.jpg 1,776 (541.3) 104 2014 Is the 4th-tallest building in the world and the tallest building in the United States since its topping out on May 10, 2013. It is also the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere and the tallest all-office building in the world.[5][6]
70 Pine Street AIB-NYC-gp.jpg 952 (290) 66 1932 17th-tallest building in the United States; formerly known as the American International Building and the Cities Service Building[7][8] 70 Pine is being transformed into a residential skyscraper with 644 rental residences, 132 hotel rooms and 35,000 square feet of retail [9]
40 Wall Street 40 Wall Street New York City at Sunset C R.jpg 927 (283) 70 1930 21st-tallest in the United States; was world's tallest building for less than two months in 1930; formerly known as the Bank of Manhattan Trust Building; also known as 40 Wall Street[10][11] 70 Pine Street is currently being converted into a residential property by New York City-based Rose Associates, and the building will feature 644 luxury rentals, 132 hotel rooms, and a landmarked lobby with ample retail [9]
One Chase Manhattan Plaza One Chase Manhattan Plaza 1.jpg 813 (248) 60 1961 [12][13]
200 West Street GoldmanSachsHeadquarters.JPG 749 (228) 44 2010 Also known as Goldman Sachs World Headquarters[14][15]
60 Wall Street 60 Wall Street building.jpg 745 (227) 55 1989 Also known as Deutsche Bank Building[16][17]
One Liberty Plaza 0013TIARA P1000433.JPG 743 (226) 54 1973 Formerly known as the U.S. Steel Building[18][19]
20 Exchange Place 20 Exchange Place Tower 111.JPG 741 (226) 57 1931 Formerly known as the City Bank-Farmers Trust Building[20][21]
200 Vesey Street World Financial Center.jpg 739 (225) 51 1986 Also known as Three World Financial Center[22][23]
HSBC Bank Building WSTM Mark Frank 0086.jpg 688 (210) 52 1967 Also known as Marine Midland Building[24][25]
55 Water Street 55 Water Street with north wing.JPG 687 (209) 53 1972 [26][27]
1 Wall Street 1 Wall Street.jpg 654 (199) 50 1931 Also known as Bank of New York Mellon Building [28][29]
225 Liberty Street World Financial Center.jpg 645 (197) 44 1987 Also known as Two World Financial Center[30][31]
1 New York Plaza One New York Plaza.jpg 640 (195) 50 1969 [32][33]
Home Insurance Plaza WSTM-CornFedChicks0080.JPG 630 (192) 45 1966 [34][35]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ Couzzo, Steve (April 25, 2007). "FiDi Soaring High". New York Post. Retrieved 3 December 2014. The Financial District is over. So is the “Wall Street area.” But say hello to FiDi, the coinage of major downtown landlord Kent Swig, who decided it’s time to humanize the old F.D. with an easily remembered, fun-sounding acronym. 
  2. ^ C. J. Hughes (August 8, 2014). "The Financial District Gains Momentum". The New York Times. Retrieved August 14, 2014. 
  3. ^ White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot with Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195383867. , p.7
  4. ^ Toy, Vivian S. "The Financial District Attracts Families", The New York Times, February 20, 2009. Accessed March 1, 2009.
  5. ^ "One World Trade Center". The Skyscraper Center. CTBUH. Retrieved 2013-05-14. 
  6. ^ Murray, Matt; Kim, Eun Kyung (2013-05-14). "Cheers Erupt as Spire Tops One World Trade Center". CNBC. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  7. ^ "American International". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  8. ^ "American International Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  9. ^ a b Cuozzo, Steve. "New plans for downtown’s 70 Pine St. are sky-high" New York Post (October 29, 2013)
  10. ^ "The Trump Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  11. ^ "Trump Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  12. ^ "One Chase Manhattan Plaza". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  13. ^ "One Chase Manhattan Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  14. ^ "Goldman Sachs Headquarters". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2012-07-21. 
  15. ^ "Goldman Sachs New World Headquarters". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2012-07-21. 
  16. ^ "60 Wall Street". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  17. ^ "60 Wall Street". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  18. ^ "One Liberty Plaza". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  19. ^ "1 Liberty Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  20. ^ "20 Exchange Place". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  21. ^ "20 Exchange Place". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  22. ^ "Three World Financial Center". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  23. ^ "Three World Financial Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  24. ^ "HSBC Bank Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  25. ^ "HSBC Bank Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  26. ^ "55 Water Street". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  27. ^ "55 Water Street". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  28. ^ "Bank of New York Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  29. ^ "Bank of New York Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  30. ^ "Two World Financial Center". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  31. ^ "Two World Financial Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  32. ^ "One New York Plaza". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  33. ^ "One New York Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 
  34. ^ "Home Insurance Plaza". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2007-11-19. 
  35. ^ "Home Insurance Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2007-11-22. 

External links[edit]