Fine (brandy)

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Fine (French word meaning "fine", as in "high quality") is a term for some high quality French brandy (generally AOC), including Cognac and Armagnac.

Varieties include:

  • Fine de Bordeaux
  • Fine de Bourgogne
  • Fine de la Marne

It was formerly quite common in France; it is now quite rare.

In popular culture[edit]

It is notably referenced in Ernest Hemingway's works, including his posthumously published A Moveable Feast, and in his 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises:

  • "We had dined at l'Avenue's and afterward went to the Café de Versailles for coffee. We had several fines after the coffee..."
  • "After the coffee and a fine we got the bill, chalked up the same as ever on a slate..."

In a scene in the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger, Bond is offered more of what Col. Smithers describes as "rather disappointing brandy." M asks what's wrong with it, and Bond replies,

  • "I'd say it's a 30-year-old fine, indifferently blended ... with an overdose of bon bois."

(Bon Bois is a Cognac which produces a potent line clay brandy.)

References[edit]