Finnish parliamentary election, 1966

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Parliamentary elections were held in Finland on 20 and 21 March 1966.[1]

Background[edit]

Centrist Prime Minister Johannes Virolainen had led a centre-right coalition government since September 1964. Meanwhile, the Social Democratic leader Rafael Paasio had moved the party somewhat more to the left, in order to attract back voters from the Social Democratic Union of Workers and Smallholders (TPSL). Finnish society was undergoing radical criticism of the traditional values - Christianity, marriage, parents' authority over their children, teachers' authority over their students, patriotism and civil servants' (including judges') authority over the private citizens. The Social Democrats and the Communists tapped into this discontent at the expense of the centre-right parties. At the same time, leading Social Democrats, such as former Social Affairs and Interior Minister Väinö Leskinen, had promised to loyally support President Kekkonen's foreign policy towards the Soviet Union, and his continuance as President. Although the Communists performed quite well in the election, they lost six seats to the Social Democratic opposition, which formed an electoral alliance with the Communists. After the election, Rafael Paasio formed a "popular front" government of the Social Democrats, Centrists, Communists and Social Democratic opposition in May 1966.[2][3]

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Social Democratic Party 645,339 27.2 55 +17
Centre Party 503,047 21.2 49 –4
Finnish People's Democratic League 502,374 21.1 41 –6
National Coalition Party 326,928 13.8 26 –6
Liberal People's Party 153,259 6.5 9 –5
Swedish People's Party 134,832 5.7 11 –2
Social Democratic Union of Workers and Smallholders 61,274 2.6 7 +5
Smallholders' Party 24,351 1.0 1 +1
Finnish Christian League 10,646 0.4 0 New
Åland Coalition 7,118 0.3 1 0
Independence Party 513 0.0 0 New
Christian Women of Western Finland 124 0.0 0 New
Christian-minded of Northern Savonia 30 0.0 0 New
Others 51 0.0 0
Write-in lists 161 0.0 0
Invalid/blank votes 8,537
Total 2,378,583 100 200 0
Registered voters/turnout 2,800,461 84.9
Source: Tilastokeskus 2004[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p606 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Seppo Zetterberg et al (2003) A Small Giant of the Finnish History, WSOY
  3. ^ Allan Tiitta and Seppo Zetterberg (1992) Finland Through the Ages, Reader's Digest
  4. ^ 595. Eduskuntavaalit 1927–2003 (Tilastokeskus 2004)