List of G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero characters (D–G)

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This is an alphabetical list of G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero characters whose code names start with the letters D-G.

Daemon[edit]

Daemon is the code name of Jeff Lacefield. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and developed an interest in computers at an early age. By the time he graduated from college at age 21, he had become quite a computer programmer, and started to develop computer viruses in his spare time. When one of these viruses was inadvertently set loose in the FBI central computer system, he was tracked down and arrested. However, the Feds saw his abilities as a programmer, and instead of being sent to federal prison, Daemon was appointed to the reinstated G.I. Joe task force, to help them thwart the top-secret nano-mite technology that was stolen from the U.S. Army by Cobra.[1]

Daemon is killed in the Devil's Due G.I. Joe series, when his neck is snapped by Serpentor during a battle with The Coil.[2]

Dart[edit]

Dart is the G.I. Joe Team's pathfinder, and he was first released as an action figure in 2002. His real name is Jimmy Tall Elk, and his rank is that of sergeant E-6.[3] Dart was born in White Earth, Minnesota.

Dart's primary military specialty is recon, and his secondary military specialty is infantry. He was a former hunting guide in Minnesota before joining the G.I. Joe team.

Dee-Jay[edit]

Dee-Jay is a member of Battleforce 2000. He is the G.I. Joe Team's communications expert and a former disk jockey (hence his code name). His real name is Thomas R. Rossi III, and he was first released as an action figure in 1989. Dee-Jay was a late addition to the team when KIA in G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #113, he died while maneuvering through an oil field when it was bombed by Cobra Commander.

Deep Six[edit]

Main article: Deep Six (G.I. Joe)

Depth Charge[edit]

Depth Charge is the G.I. Joe Team's underwater demolitions expert. His real name is Nick H. Langdon, and he was first released as an action figure in 2003.[3] He specializes in clearing mines and other devices in the water. Despite having some of the best scores in the history of the UDT program and loving his job, he hates water.

Dial Tone[edit]

Main article: Dial Tone (G.I. Joe)

Doc[edit]

Main article: Doc (G.I. Joe)

Dodger[edit]

Dodger is a member of Battleforce 2000. He is the G.I. Joe Team's maintenance expert, and operator of the hi-tech battle cycle "Marauder". His real name is Richard Renwick, and he was first released as an action figure in 1987. Dodger is the only survivor of the incident that killed the other members of Battleforce 2000, and later became a transportation specialist and member of the Sonic Fighters.

Dogfight[edit]

Dogfight is the G.I. Joe Team's Mudfighter pilot, and he was first released as an action figure in 1989, packaged with the Mudfighter bomber.[4] His real name is James R. King, and his rank is that of 1st Lieutenant, USAF O-2. Dogfight was born in Providence, Rhode Island.

Dogfight's primary military specialty is Mudfighter pilot, and his secondary military specialty is electronics technician. The combination of his uncanny depth perception, precise hand/eye coordination, and powerful throwing arm got him permanently forbidden from every county fair and carnival in Alabama for winning too many stuffed bears. He now uses those same skills to destroy Cobra's vehicles.

In the Marvel Comics G.I. Joe series, he first appeared in G.I. Joe Special Missions #28. In that issue, Dogfight assists in saving the USS Flagg. In the same issue, he also breaks the "fourth wall" as part of a group addressing the reader.[5] Later, Dogfight is the co-pilot for Ace during a recon mission over the supposedly friendly skies of Benzheen. Their craft is shot up off-panel by a Cobra Rattler. They escape to the awaiting aircraft carrier, the USS Flagg. Dogfight urges Ace to punch out. He does not, because he knows Dogfight's ejection system is shot to pieces and Ace could not live with knowing he abandoned his co-pilot. In the same issue, the pilots Slip-Stream and Ghostrider take another flight over Benzheen in a Steal Fighter. Ghostrider and later, Hawk both refer to Slip-Stream as Dogfight.[6]

Dogfight also appears in the America's Elite G.I. Joe series from Devil's Due. He is part of a small group of Joe pilots sent to assist European military forces. Despite expectations, they survive the mission.[7] He also witnesses Iron Grenadier pilots suffering aircraft malfunctions.[8]

Dojo[edit]

Main article: Ninja Force

Dojo is the code name of Michael P. Russo. He was born in San Francisco, California. Impressed by his skills and integrity, Storm Shadow recruited Dojo for the G.I. Joe's new sub-team, Ninja Force. He is noted for using "patter" to distract his opponents. He also prefers to drive the G.I. Joe vehicle "Brawler".[9]

Double Blast[edit]

Double Blast is a heavy machine gunner for the G.I. Joe Team. His real name is Charles L. Griffith, and he was released as an action figure in 2001.[3] Double Blast served as a replacement for Roadblock on a handful of classified missions, while G.I. Joe was temporarily decommissioned.[10] He is known to have knowledge on how to assemble, disassemble, and reassemble a weapon in less than 60 seconds in the dark.

Downtown[edit]

Downtown is the G.I. Joe Team's mortar man, and he was first released as an action figure in 1989.[11] His real name is Thomas P. Riley, and his rank is that of corporal E-4. Downtown was born in Cleveland, Ohio.

Downtown's primary military specialty is infantry, and his secondary military specialty is special operations. Downtown can keep up with a highly mobile, rapid strike force like G.I. Joe with his high-powered mortar, whereas slow, ponderous artillery cannot. He can judge range and trajectory just by eyesight.

In the America's Elite G.I. Joe series from Devil's Due, Downtown is one of the many Joes to take part in the second Cobra civil war, which again takes place on Cobra Island.[12]

Dr. Link Talbot[edit]

Dr. Link Talbot is the G.I. Joe Team's combat veterinarian, and was first released as an action figure in 2004.[3] He served as a chief veterinarian at a National Zoo, and later joined the Navy as a Navy Seal. He later joined G.I. Joe when it came to the venomization plans of Cobra Commander and Doctor Mindbender.

He is voiced by Joe May in G.I. Joe: Valor vs. Venom.

Drop Zone[edit]

Drop Zone is the G.I. Joe Team's Sky Patrol weapon specialist. His real name is Samuel C. Delisi, and he was born in Poteau, Oklahoma. Drop Zone was first released as an action figure in 1990, as part of the "Sky Patrol" line.[13] He is also a Special Forces adviser. He is noted for volunteering for every dangerous assignment and deeply enjoying his job.[14]

Drop Zone appears in the DiC G.I. Joe cartoon, voiced by Don Brown.[15]

Duke[edit]

Main article: Duke (G.I. Joe)

Dusty[edit]

Main article: Dusty (G.I. Joe)

Effects[edit]

Effects is the G.I. Joe Team's explosives expert, and he was first released as an action figure in 1994, as part of the Star Brigade line.[16] His real name is Aron Beck. Effects was born in Fort Worth, Texas.

His primary military specialty is explosives/munitions ordnance. His secondary military specialty is special effects coordinator. He uses visual distractions to draw attention away from targets he then destroys.[17]

Fast Draw[edit]

Fast Draw is the G.I. Joe Team's mobile missile specialist, and he was first released as an action figure in 1987.[18] His real name is Eliot Brown, and his rank is that of corporal E-4. Fast Draw was born in Collierville, Tennessee.

Fast Draw's primary military specialty is ordnance, and his secondary military specialty is clerk typist. Fast Draw carries the FAFNIR (Fire and Forget Non-tube-launched Infantry Rocket) missile system, and wears a protective suit to shield him from hot exhaust gases. The FAFNIR target acquisition and homing devices are self-contained within the missile, which allows the operator to move and take cover immediately after launch. These missiles are extremely fast, and resistant to ECM jamming.[19]

In the Marvel Comics G.I. Joe series, he first appeared in issue #60. Along with Chuckles, Falcon, and Law and Order, he is part of a faux G.I. Joe team being used by others for political gain. After the "new" Joes assist Hawk in battling several Dreadnoks, they are made official members of the team. The conflict had been over a rogue US military faction trying to use a high-tech missile to destroy Cobra Island.[20] He is spotlighted in a latter incident, destroying Cobra tanks threatening his fellow soldiers.[21]

Firewall[edit]

Firewall is the code name of Michele LaChance. She was born in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and learned early on that she had a knack for computers. In high school, she figured out how to access protected school records and alter grades. This eventually led to hacking government systems and classified military computers, which landed her in federal prison. But her handiwork impressed enough people, that she was sent to the G.I. Joe Team under supervision of Mainframe. There, she received basic military training, and has since been a loyal member, though she is not a field operative.[22] Firewall was instrumental in developing a counter-program, to thwart the top-secret nano-mite technology that was stolen from the U.S. Army by Cobra.[1]

Flash[edit]

Main article: Flash (G.I. Joe)

Flint[edit]

Main article: Flint (G.I. Joe)

Footloose[edit]

Main article: Footloose (G.I. Joe)

Freefall[edit]

Freefall is the G.I. Joe Team's paratrooper, and he was first released as an action figure in 1990.[13] He had a 2009 re-release as "Spc. Altitude", but is the same character.[23] This latter release was part of the "Assault On Cobra Island" box set, which included the figures Chuckles, Hit and Run, Outback, Recondo, Wet-Suit and Zap. Freefall's real name is Phillip W. Arndt, and he was born in Downers Grove, Illinois.

In order to prepare for the Airborne Ranger school, he went through the Ranger Indoctrination Course designed to remove forty percent of the applicants. Freefall then had to conquer a three week pre-training course, simply to qualify for the full eight week training course. He is noted for having enjoyed it and come out the best of the Rangers. Freefall has a master's degree in Eastern Philosophy. He is known for having a large ego.[24]

Freefall appeared in the DiC G.I. Joe cartoon series voiced by Scott McNeil.[15]

Fridge[edit]

The Fridge is the code name used by William Perry. He was born in Aiken, South Carolina. During his time as a member of the NFL's Chicago Bears football team, Perry worked with G.I. Joe as a physical training instructor. Though he was one of many Joes listed on the World War III member assignment map in America's Elite #28, The Fridge was unavailable during the conflict known as World War III.[25]

Frostbite[edit]

Main article: Frostbite (G.I. Joe)

Gears[edit]

Gears is the G.I. Joe Team's invention technician, and he was first released as an action figure in 1994, packaged with the "G.I. Joe Power Fighter" as part of the Star Brigade line. His real name is Joseph A. Morrone, and he was born in Westerly, Rhode Island.

His primary military specialty is chief engineer (special projects). His secondary military specialty is research and development. His figure was a repainting of an earlier G.I. Joe figure, Barricade.

General Colton[edit]

Main article: General Joseph Colton

General Flagg[edit]

Main article: General Flagg

General Rey[edit]

General Rey was introduced in the Devil's Due G.I. Joe series.[volume & issue needed] His real name is Philip A. Rey, and he emerged from seemingly nowhere, to become the field commander of the G.I. Joe Team. It was later revealed that Rey is one of the dozen original clones that were produced during Cobra's development of Serpentor. Dr. Mindbender altered Rey's growth patterns and features to hide his connection to the Cobra Emperor. Additionally, Crystal Ball helped construct Rey's personality, and Zandar helped insert him as a U.S. military general, in order to make him Cobra's most insidious sleeper agent. Unexpectedly, Rey's years of service and his time with G.I. Joe helped him shake off Cobra's control, and he refused to betray his countrymen, despite deeply implanted hypnotic triggers. Rey's past remains classified, known only to a handful of Joes.[26]

Ghostrider[edit]

Ghostrider is the G.I. Joe Team's stealth fighter pilot, and he was first released as an action figure in 1988, packaged with the Phantom X-19 Stealth Fighter.[27] His real name is Jonas S. Jeffries, and his rank is that of Major, USAF O-4. Ghostrider was born in Chicago, Illinois.

Ghostrider's primary military specialty is stealth fighter pilot, and his secondary military specialty is aeronautical engineer. Ghostrider has been working on not being noticed since the second grade; teachers never noticed him because he conscientiously worked on not being noticed.

In the Marvel Comics G.I. Joe series, he first appeared in issue #76. There he is one of the many Joes to participate in the first Cobra civil war on Cobra Island.[28] He is featured in issue #16 of G.I. Joe Special Missions. He later spends a week with Scarlett, helping to establish a Stealth Fighter base in South America. It is destroyed in a raid orchestrated by Cobra Commander and Darklon. Ghostrider manages to lift off, and assists in saving the aircraft carrier the USS Flagg and the space shuttle the USS Defiant. Also in the battle on the side of the Joes, is the pilot Dogfight in his own craft.[29]

Later, Ghostrider and Slip-Stream, working off the USS Flagg, run a recon mission over the fictional country of Benzheen. Rampart and Backblast save the duo, by shooting down a Cobra Rattler. As with his other appearances, Ghostrider accepts that nobody can remember his code-name. While the mission succeeds, the Stealth Fighter is a complete loss. For most of the issue, Slip-Stream is referred to as "Dogfight", who survived an earlier wreck onto the Flagg in the same issue.[6]

A running gag throughout the Marvel G.I. Joe comic series was that Ghostrider's name was never actually said by any other Joes, or even used in narration. In reality, this was done to avoid any potential issues or problems with Marvel's own Ghost Rider,[citation needed] despite the G.I. Joe character’s named being spelled differently as one word.

G.I. Jane[edit]

G.I. Jane is the code name of Jane Ann Martelle. She serves as a combat medic for the G.I. Joe Team, and was first released as an action figure in 2006.[3]

Grand Slam[edit]

Main article: Grand Slam (G.I. Joe)

Grunt[edit]

Main article: Grunt (G.I. Joe)

Gung-Ho[edit]

Main article: Gung-Ho (G.I. Joe)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Wherle, Scott (2002). G.I. Joe: Battle Files #1. Devil's Due Publishing. p. 30. 
  2. ^ "G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero" vol. 2 #23 (2003)
  3. ^ a b c d e Hidalgo, Pablo (2009). G.I. Joe vs. Cobra: The Essential Guide 1982-2008. Random House. pp. 62–65. ISBN 978-0-345-51642-8. 
  4. ^ Santelmo, Vincent (1994). The Official 30th Anniversary Salute To G.I. Joe 1964-1994. Krause Publications. p. 125. ISBN 0-87341-301-6. 
  5. ^ G.I. Joe Special Missions #28 (1989)
  6. ^ a b G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #115 (August 1991)
  7. ^ G.I. Joe: America's Elite #32 (2007)
  8. ^ G.I. Joe: America's Elite #35 (2007)
  9. ^ "Dojo's filecard". Yojoe.com. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  10. ^ Hidalgo, Pablo (2009). G.I. Joe vs. Cobra: The Essential Guide 1982-2008. Random House. p. 22. ISBN 978-0-345-51642-8. 
  11. ^ Santelmo, Vincent (1994). The Official 30th Anniversary Salute To G.I. Joe 1964-1994. Krause Publications. p. 123. ISBN 0-87341-301-6. 
  12. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero vol. 2 #24-25
  13. ^ a b Santelmo, Vincent (1994). The Official 30th Anniversary Salute To G.I. Joe 1964-1994. Krause Publications. p. 128. ISBN 0-87341-301-6. 
  14. ^ "Drop Zone". yojoe.com. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  15. ^ a b "The Voices of G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero (1989, Animated Series) - Voice Cast Listing at Voice Chasers". Voicechasers.com. 1989-09-02. Retrieved 2014-03-30. 
  16. ^ "Star Brigade/Effects package details". Yojoe.com. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  17. ^ "Effects Filecard". Yojoe.com. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  18. ^ Santelmo, Vincent (1994). The Official 30th Anniversary Salute To G.I. Joe 1964-1994. Krause Publications. p. 111. ISBN 0-87341-301-6. 
  19. ^ Hama, Larry (1987). Howard Mackie, ed. G.I. Joe Order Of Battle. Marvel Entertainment Group. p. 49. ISBN 0-87135-288-5. 
  20. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #60
  21. ^ G.I.Joe: A Real American Hero #74 (August 1988)
  22. ^ Hidalgo, Pablo (2009). G.I. Joe vs. Cobra: The Essential Guide 1982-2008. Random House. p. 46. ISBN 978-0-345-51642-8. 
  23. ^ "Freefall toy information". Yojoe.com. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  24. ^ "Freefall filecard". Yojoe.com. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  25. ^ The Fridge at JMM's G.I. Joe Comics Home Page
  26. ^ Hidalgo, Pablo (2009). G.I. Joe vs. Cobra: The Essential Guide 1982-2008. Random House. p. 55. ISBN 978-0-345-51642-8. 
  27. ^ Santelmo, Vincent (1994). The Official 30th Anniversary Salute To G.I. Joe 1964-1994. Krause Publications. p. 119. ISBN 0-87341-301-6. 
  28. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #76 (September 1988)
  29. ^ G.I. Joe Special Missions #28 (Mid-November 1989)

External links[edit]