First Menzies Ministry

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The First Menzies Ministry was the twenty-sixth Australian Commonwealth ministry, and ran from 26 April 1939 to 14 March 1940.[1]

United Australia Party

  • Rt Hon Robert Menzies, KC MP: Prime Minister, Treasurer. Minister for Defence Co-ordination (from 13 November 1939), Minister for Trade and Customs (from 23 February 1940)
  • Rt Hon Billy Hughes, KC MP: Attorney-General, Minister for Industry
  • Hon John Perkins, MP: Minister without portfolio administering External Territories
  • Hon Geoffrey Street, MP: Minister for Defence (to 13 November 1939), Minister for the Army (from 13 November 1939)
  • Hon Richard Casey, DSO MC MP: Minister for Supply and Development (to 26 January 1940)
  • Hon Sir Henry Somer Gullett, KCMG MP: Minister for External Affairs. Minister for Information (from 12 September 1939)
  • Senator Hon George McLeay: Minister for Commerce
  • Hon John Lawson, MP: Minister for Trade and Customs (to 23 February 1940)
  • Hon Eric Harrison, MP: Postmaster-General, Minister for Repatriation
  • Hon James Fairbairn, MP: Minister for Civil Aviation. Minister for Air (from 13 November 1939). Vice-President of the Executive Council (to 26 January 1940)
  • Hon Sir Frederick Stewart, MP: Minister for Health, Minister for Social Services. Minister for the Navy (from 13 November 1939). Minister for Supply and Development (from 26 January 1940)
  • Senator Hon Harry Foll: Minister for the Interior
  • Senator Hon Herbert Collett: Minister without portfolio administering War Service Homes
  • Hon Harold Holt, MP: Minister without portfolio assisting the Minister for Supply and Development. Minister without portfolio assisting the Minister for Trade and Customs (from 23 February 1940)
  • Senator Hon Philip McBride: Minister without portfolio assisting the Minister for Commerce
  • Hon Percy Spender, KC MP: Minister without portfolio assisting the Treasurer (to 3 November 1939), Vice-President of the Executive Council (from 26 January 1940)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Ministries and Cabinets". Parliamentary Handbook. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 17 September 2010.