Fischer (company)

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Fischer Sports GmbH
Industry Sporting goods
Founded 1924
Headquarters Austria, Ried im Innkreis
Key people Josef Fischer, Sr., founder
Mag. Franz Föttinger, CEO
Mag. Dr. Bernhard Matzner, CFO
Products Alpine Skis, Alpine Bindings, Alpine Boots, Alpine Poles, Nordic Skis, Nordic Bindings, Nordic Boots, Nordic Poles, Jumping Skis, Accessories and Hockey
Website www.fischersports.com

Fischer Sports is an Austrian company that produces Nordic Skiing, Alpine Skiing and Hockey equipment. It is one of the largest manufacturers of equipment in the world cup for both Nordic and Alpine skiing disciplines and manufactures a wide range of skis and ski equipment targeted against both professionals and amateurs. Fischer has achieved innovative success in both Alpine and Nordic in the last three world cup championships.

Affiliated companies[edit]

Fischer Sports has several affilitates:[1]

  • Fischer + Löffler Germany GmbH (GER)
  • Fischer Ltd. (RUS)
  • Fischer Mukatschewo (UKR)
  • Fischer Skis US, LLC (USA)
  • Fischer Footwear SRL, Montebelluna (ITA)
  • Fischer France SARL (FRA)

History[edit]

The early years

The company was founded in 1924 by Josef Fischer, Sr., a cartwright, in Ried im Innkreis, northeast of Salzburg, Austria. In addition to making wagons, he made an occasional pair of skis. By 1938,[2] the company had significantly expanded it ski manufacturing, with 30 employees, and selling 2,000 pairs of handmade skis in the United States alone. Following the conclusion of World War II, Josef Fischer, Jr. became involved in the reconstruction of the company.

Emergence into a new era

In 1949, Fischer developed the first ski press to speed up production, which was still by hand. By 1958,[3] the company employed 137 craftsmen, and was manufacturing 53,000 pairs of skis annually. In that year, Fischer adopted its three-triangle logo. In 1964, the company completed a new factory on the outskirts of town, featuring a state-of-the-art computerized sawmill. Fischer also introduces metal skis for the first time, on which Egon Zimmerman wins the downhill at the 1964 Winter Olympics. By 1967, the company had 775 employees, and produced 330,000 pairs of skis. The company has devoted considerable research efforts over the years to develop skis for racing, including alpine skiing, cross-country skiing, and skis for attempting the world speed record.[4]


Fischer Sports Factory - Ried im Innkreis (AT) - 2013

On the fast track

In the early 70s Fischer is the biggest skimanufacturer in the world.[5] The Europa 77 with its fibre-glass technology was revolutionary. This was the foundation to capture the skandinavian market. Franz Klammer won the Olympics in 1976 on Fischer C4 skis. In 1988 Fischer opened the factory in Mukatschewo (Ukraine).

Family ties

2002 was the year of the buy back. Ever since then Fischer is 100% family-owned. In 2011 Fischer was able to present a worldfirst: the VACUUM FIT.[6] With this technology it is possible to fully adapt the skiboots which makes them more comfortable to wear.

In 2013 the headquarters were renovated.

Rottefella/Fischer Partnership[edit]

Beginning 2007-2008, Fischer partnered with Nordic Binding producer Rottefella. Rottefella bindings will be the official bindings of Fischer Skis boots. Fischer boots used the Salomon Nordic System (SNS) up until the 2007/2008 season. Rottefella is the manufacturer of NNN (New Nordic Norm) bindings. These two binding systems are not compatible, and, beginning in 2007, Fischer boots will be using the NNN system to be compatible with Rottefella bindings.

Fischer in alpine skiing[edit]

Fischer in nordic skiing[edit]

Fischer in professional tennis[edit]

Male Players[edit]

Female Players[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.fischersports.com/de/Alpine/Unternehmen/Daten-und-Fakten
  2. ^ 80 Years Fischer History
  3. ^ 80 Years Fischer History
  4. ^ "The Fischer Story", Skiing (November 1985) p. 142
  5. ^ 80 Years Fischer History
  6. ^ ISPO European Ski Award 2011

External links[edit]