Five Boro Bike Tour

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Five Boro Bike Tour
TD Five Boro Bike Tour logo.jpg
2014 TD Five Boro Bike Tour
Date First Sunday in May
Location New York City
Event type Bicycle road ride
Distance 40-mile (64 km)
Primary sponsor TD Bank
Established 1977
Official site bikenewyork.org
Riders at the starting point

The Five Boro Bike Tour, sponsored by TD Bank beginning in 2014,[1] is an annual recreational cycling event in New York City. It is produced by Bike New York. Conducted on the first Sunday of May, the 40-mile (64 km) ride includes over 30,000 riders. The route takes riders through all five of New York's boroughs and across five major bridges. The entire route, including bridges and expressways which normally prohibit cyclists, is closed to automobile traffic for the ride.[2]

The event began on June 12, 1977 as the Five Boro Challenge with about 250 participants on an 80-mile course.[3]

New York City Mayor Ed Koch promoted the idea of a city-wide bike tour and the distance was shortened.[3]

From 1979 to 1990, Citibank was the primary sponsor of the event. In 1991 the tour was cancelled due to monetary problems, but returned in 1992.[4] TD Bank bought naming rights to the tour. In 2013 the City proposed to charge the Tour nearly a million dollars for police services.[5]

The route begins in Lower Manhattan, heads north via Sixth Avenue through the interior of Central Park and continues into Harlem and the Bronx via the Madison Avenue Bridge. Re-entering Manhattan and traveling south along the East River on the FDR Drive. The route crosses the Queensboro Bridge into Queens before heading south across the Pulaski Bridge into Brooklyn, over the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway via the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge into Staten Island.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2014 Sponsors". Retrieved May 9, 2014. 
  2. ^ Schwartz, Sam (3 May 2012). "Five Boro Bike Tour will bring rolling street, bridge and highway closings beginning early Sunday morning". New York Daily News. 
  3. ^ a b "40 year bike trip". NY Times. May 2, 2014. 
  4. ^ "History". Retrieved May 9, 2014. 
  5. ^ J. David GOODMAN (April 4, 2013). "City fee for bike tour". NY Times. 
  6. ^ "Map". Retrieved May 9, 2014. 

External links[edit]