Fixed orbit

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For planetary motion, see Stationary orbit.
For orbit around Earth, see Geostationary orbit.

A fixed orbit is the concept, in atomic physics, where an electron is considered to remain in a specific orbit, at a fixed distance from an atom's nucleus, for a particular energy level.[1][2] The concept was promoted by quantum physicist Niels Bohr circa 1913.[2][3][4] The idea of the fixed orbit is considered a major component of the Bohr model (or Bohr theory).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Student Years, 1920 - 1927: The Old Quantum Theory", AIP.org, 2010, webpage: AIP-5c.
  2. ^ a b "Introductory Chemistry - Google Books Result", Steven S. Zumdahl, Google Books, 2007, p. SL1-59, webpage: Books-Google-PkC.
  3. ^ "Lesson 3-2 The Development of the Atomic Model", FordhamPrep.com, February 7, 2008, webpage: Fordham-Curran-32.
  4. ^ "The Quantum Atom - BIOdotEDU", CUNY.edu, 2010, webpage: CUNY-Pos-2.