Flag of Veneto

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Regione Veneto
Flag of Veneto.svg
Adopted May 20, 1975
Design The arms of Regione Veneto on a Pompeian red background; on the fly edge, seven tails bearing the coat of arms of the seven province capitals of Veneto.

The flag of the Region of Veneto derives from the flag used by the Republic of Venice and was adopted by Legge Regionale (Regional Law) 20 maggio 1975, n. 56 and amended by L.R. del 22 febbraio 1999, which deleted the words "Regione del Veneto".[1] Regione Veneto also has a banner (gonfalone), its design identical to the flag's except in its vertical orientation.

Design[edit]

The main overall layout and design of the Venetian banner was kept. The coat of arms of the Region is set in a square in the center of the flag: the Lion of Saint Mark with the opened gospel (reading the Latin motto Pax tibi Marce evangelista meus, "Peace to you Mark, my evangelist") rests its paws on the landscape of Veneto: sea (the Adriatic), land (the Venetian Plain) and mountains (the Alps).[1]

Attached to the fly edge are seven tails. Each bears in the middle the coat of arms of one of Veneto's seven province capitals,[1] sorted in reverse alphabetical order. From top to bottom:

Former flag of the Republic of Venice.

A tricolour ribbon is to be knotted just below the flagpole finial.

Differences from the Republic of Venice flag[edit]

  • The Lion is no longer on a red field.
  • The tails were six, representing the six sestieri ("sixths", the districts of old Venice).
  • Dark blue has been added to the red and gold decorations, as this colour was acknowledged as a symbol of the Veneti in the past (blavum seu venetum colorem "blue, that is, Veneto colour").

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Legge regionale 20 maggio 1975, n. 56 (BUR n. 22/1975)". Consiglio regionale del Veneto official website (in Italian). Retrieved July 14, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Flag of Veneto at Wikimedia Commons