Flandreau, South Dakota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Flandreau
City
Flandreau, South Dakota
Motto: "The Heart Of Eastern South Dakota"
Location in Moody County and the state of South Dakota
Location in Moody County and the state of South Dakota
Coordinates: 44°2′52″N 96°35′47″W / 44.04778°N 96.59639°W / 44.04778; -96.59639Coordinates: 44°2′52″N 96°35′47″W / 44.04778°N 96.59639°W / 44.04778; -96.59639
Country United States
State South Dakota
County Moody
Incorporated 1902[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.93 sq mi (5.00 km2)
 • Land 1.86 sq mi (4.82 km2)
 • Water 0.07 sq mi (0.18 km2)
Elevation 1,565 ft (477 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 2,341
 • Estimate (2013)[4] 2,301
 • Density 1,258.6/sq mi (485.9/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 57028
Area code(s) 605
FIPS code 46-21540[5]
GNIS feature ID 1255073[6]
Website City of Flandreau

Flandreau /ˈflændr/ FLAN-droo[7] is a city in Moody County, South Dakota, United States. The population was 2,341 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Moody County.[8] It was named in honor of Charles Eugene Flandrau, a judge in the territory and state of Minnesota, who is credited with saving the community of New Ulm, Minnesota, from destruction during conflict with the Sioux in 1862.

Geography[edit]

Flandreau is located at 44°2′52″N 96°35′47″W / 44.04778°N 96.59639°W / 44.04778; -96.59639 (44.047855, -96.596417),[9] along the Big Sioux River.[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.93 square miles (5.00 km2), of which, 1.86 square miles (4.82 km2) is land and 0.07 square miles (0.18 km2) is water.[2]

Flandreau has been assigned the ZIP code 57028 and the FIPS place code 21540.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 471
1890 569 20.8%
1900 1,244 118.6%
1910 1,484 19.3%
1920 1,929 30.0%
1930 1,934 0.3%
1940 2,212 14.4%
1950 2,193 −0.9%
1960 2,129 −2.9%
1970 2,027 −4.8%
1980 2,114 4.3%
1990 2,311 9.3%
2000 2,376 2.8%
2010 2,341 −1.5%
Est. 2013 2,301 −1.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
2013 Estimate[4]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,341 people, 973 households, and 583 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,258.6 inhabitants per square mile (485.9/km2). There were 1,091 housing units at an average density of 586.6 per square mile (226.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 64.2% White, 0.5% African American, 27.7% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 1.5% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.5% of the population.

There were 973 households of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.6% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.1% were non-families. 34.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 3.00.

The median age in the city was 38.4 years. 25.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.3% were from 25 to 44; 25.1% were from 45 to 64; and 18.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.3% male and 52.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 2,376 people, 986 households, and 605 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,370.9 people per square mile (530.3/km²). There were 1,090 housing units at an average density of 628.9 per square mile (243.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 70.62% White, 0.46% African American, 24.92% Native American, 1.22% Asian, 0.08% from other races, and 2.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.05% of the population.

There were 986 households out of which 30.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.6% were non-families. 34.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 24.2% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 20.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 88.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.1 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $31,090, and the median income for a family was $40,272. Males had a median income of $26,369 versus $19,738 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,895. About 9.8% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 10.9% of those age 65 or over.

Early history[edit]

1883 illustration of Flandreau

The town of Flandreau, or possibly Flandrau, was originally settled in 1857, and named for U.S Indian Agent Charles E. Flandrau. The settlement, like others in the region was abandoned within a year, as a result of threatening activities of the Yankton Sioux. In 1869, the town was resettled by twenty-five families of Christianized Sioux from the Santee reservation. White settlement resumed in 1872. When Moody County was organized in 1873, Flandreau was made the county seat. Richard F. Pettigrew of Sioux Falls, a relative of Pettigrew settlers in Flandreau, made the establishment of an Indian School at Flandreau part of his successful 1889 campaign for the U.S. Senate; the Riggs Institute was opened in 1892 and is today known as the Flandreau Indian School.

Notable native[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "SD Towns". South Dakota State Historical Society. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-21. 
  4. ^ a b "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-11-08. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Broadcast Pronunciation Guide and South Dakota Pronunciations". Associated Press. Retrieved 2009-11-10. 
  8. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  10. ^ DeLorme (2001). South Dakota Atlas & Gazetteer. Yarmouth, Maine: DeLorme. ISBN 0-89933-330-3
  11. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved November 8, 2014.