Flat glass

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Plate glass is often used in windows, such as at this cafe in Tel Aviv, Israel overlooking the Mediterranean Sea.
Fragment of a Roman window glass plate dated to 1st to 4th century A.D.

Flat glass, sheet glass, glass pane, or plate glass is a type of glass, initially produced in plane form, commonly used for windows, glass doors, transparent walls, and windshields. For modern architectural and automotive applications, the flat glass is sometimes bent after production of the plane sheet. Flat glass stands in contrast to container glass (used for bottles, jars, cups) and glass fiber (used for thermal insulation, in fiberglass composites, and optical communication).

Glass for flat glass has a higher magnesium oxide and sodium oxide content than container glass, and a lower silica, calcium oxide, and aluminium oxide content.[1] (From the lower soluble oxide content comes the better chemical durability of container glass against water, which is required especially for storage of beverages and food).

Most flat glass is soda-lime glass, produced by the float glass process. Other processes for making flat glass include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling"; Eds.: Thomas P. Seward III and Terese Vascott; The American Ceramic Society, Westerville, Ohio, 2005, ISBN 1-57498-225-7