Flavored liquor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A selection of flavored vodkas.

Flavored liquors (also called infused liquors)[1] are alcoholic beverages that have added flavoring and, in some cases, a small amount of added sugar. They are distinct from liqueurs in that liqueurs have a large sugar content and may also contain glycerine.

Flavored liquors may have a base of vodka or white rum, both of which have little taste of their own, or they may have a tequila or brandy base. Typically, a fruit extract and, in some cases, sugar syrup are added to the base spirit.[2]

A growing segment is higher-powered flavored liquors. In that connection, Maple or Honey may be added. Cinnamon has become an important flavoring for many kinds of liquor, including Rum, Whiskey. Brandy, Vodka and Tequila. It is touted as a way to increase sales. There are many cinnamon-infused liquors on the market. See Fireball and discussion therein.

Flavored rice wine, rum, tequila, vodka and whiskey[edit]

Flavored rums and vodkas frequently have an alcohol content that is 5–10% ABV less than the corresponding unflavored spirit, though in Poland the content of alcohol in flavoured vodkas is usually only 4% lower than that of their base vodka.

  • Flavored rice wines - flavors include star anise-coffee, banana-cinnamon, coconut-pineapple, galangal-tamarind, ginger-red chili, green tea-orange, lemon-lemongrass and mango-green chili.
  • Flavored rums in the West Indies originally consisted only of spiced rums such as Captain Morgan whereas in the Indian Ocean (Madagascar, Reunion Island and Mauritius) only of vanilla and fruits. Available flavors include cinnamon, lemon, lime, orange, vanilla, and raspberry, and extend to such exotic flavors as mango, coconut, pineapple, banana, passion fruit, and watermelon.
  • Flavored tequilas — flavors include lime, orange, mango, coconut, watermelon, strawberry, pomegranate, chili pepper, cinnamon, jalapeño, cocoa and coffee.
  • Flavored vodkas — flavors include lemon, lime, lemon-lime, orange, tangerine, grapefruit, raspberry, strawberry, blueberry, vanilla, black currant, chili pepper, cherry, apple, green apple, cinnamon, coffee, chocolate, cranberry, peach, pear, passion fruit, pomegranate, plum, mango, white grape, banana, pineapple, coconut, mint, melon, rose, buffalo grass, açaí, herbs (kryddat brännvin), bacon, honey, cinnamon, kiwifruit, feijoa, whipped cream, tea, root beer, caramel, white cake, chocolate cake, candy bar, and marshmallow.

Other flavored liquors[edit]

  • Absinthe (wormwood, anise, fennel, and other herbs)
  • Akvavit (caraway seeds, anise, dill, fennel, coriander, and grains of paradise)
  • Anise liquors: A family of liquors native to the Eastern Mediterranean distilled from grapes and flavored with anise seed:
    • Arak - Arab variant native to the Fertile Crescent
    • Rakı - Turkish variant
    • Ouzo - Greek variant
      • Tsipouro - Ancestral form of Ouzo. Most commonly unflavored, but when flavored, typically flavored with anise. [3][4]
  • Gin (juniper and other herbs)
  • Bitters (various herbs)
  • Brandy (blackberry, cherry, coffee)
  • Schnapps - American variety, a basic alcohol infused with various flavors

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bar & Beverage Book Katsigris, Costas and Thomas, Chris. 2006. ISBN 0-471-64799-3.
  2. ^ The Business of Spirits Rothbaum, Noah. 2007. ISBN 1-4277-5475-6.
  3. ^ The Food and Wine of Greece Kochilas, Diane. 1993. ISBN 0-312-08783-7.
  4. ^ Regional Greek Cooking Karayanis, Dean. 2008. ISBN 0-7818-1146-5.