Flo Hyman Award

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The Flo Hyman Memorial Award was conferred annually between 1987 and 2004 by the Women's Sports Foundation in Washington, D.C., United States, on the organization's National Girls and Women in Sports Day to the female sportsperson, irrespective of nationality or sport contested, adjudged to have capture[d] [best]...the dignity, spirit, and commitment to excellence[1] of American indoor volleyballer Flo Hyman, an advocate for gender equality in sport and for the passage of Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1988 who died suddenly and unexpectedly in January 1986.[2] The award was given with respect both to athletic performance and to charitable activism, especially in the context of [increasing] sports opportunities for all girls and women.[1]

List of winners[edit]

Year Recipient Nationality Sport contested Ref
1987 Navratilova, MartinaMartina Navratilova  United States Tennis [3]
1988 Joyner-Kersee, JackieJackie Joyner-Kersee  United States Athletics [4]
1989 Ashford, EvelynEvelyn Ashford  United States Athletics [5]
1990 Evert, ChrisChris Evert  United States Tennis [6]
1991 Golden-Brosnihan, DianaDiana Golden-Brosnihan  United States Paralympic alpine skiing [7]
1992 Lopez, NancyNancy Lopez  United States Golf [8]
1993 Woodard, LynetteLynette Woodard  United States Basketball [9]
1994 Sheehan, PattyPatty Sheehan  United States Golf [10]
1995 Retton, Mary LouMary Lou Retton  United States Artistic gymnastics [11]
1996 de Varona, DonnaDonna de Varona  United States Swimming [12]
1997 King, Billie JeanBillie Jean King  United States Tennis [13]
1998 Comăneci, NadiaNadia Comăneci  Romania Artistic gymnastics [14]
1999 Blair, BonnieBonnie Blair  United States Speedskating [15]
2000 Seles, MonicaMonica Seles  United States Tennis [16]
2001 Leslie, LisaLisa Leslie  United States Basketball [17]
2002 Richardson, DotDot Richardson  United States Softball [18]
2003 El Moutawakel, NawalNawal El Moutawakel  Morocco Athletics [19]
2004 Yamaguchi, KristiKristi Yamaguchi  United States Figure skating [20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Flo Hyman Memorial Award description". Women's Sports Foundation. Archived from the original on August 12, 2007. Retrieved October 6, 2007. 
  2. ^ "Flo Hyman biography". West Virginia University Department of Physical Education. Retrieved October 6, 2007. 
  3. ^ "Navratilova wins Flo Hyman award". Herald-Journal (Spartanburg, South Carolina: The New York Times Company). February 6, 1987. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  4. ^ Vecsey, George (February 5, 1988). "Sports of The Times; Remembering Flo Hyman". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  5. ^ Thomas Jr., Robert (February 3, 1989). "Ashford Calls for an End To Women's Steroid Use". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  6. ^ "Sports People: Tennis; An Honor for Evert". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). February 10, 1990. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  7. ^ Chamberlain, Tony (February 10, 1991). "A Golden triumph in uphill battle". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  8. ^ Shapiro, Leonard (February 7, 1992). "Groundbreaking Lopez Gets Flo Hyman Award". The Washington Post (The Washington Post Company). p. C3. Retrieved March 9, 2011. (subscription required)
  9. ^ "Woodard receives Flo Hyman award". Bangor Daily News (Bangor Publishing Company). February 5, 1993. p. 10. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  10. ^ Vecsey, George (February 4, 1994). "Sports of The Times; Vicki-Maria Overshadow Tonya-Nancy". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Hillary Self-Admitted Klutz". Times-Union (Warsaw, Indiana). February 3, 1995. p. 9A. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  12. ^ Pai, Darren (January 31, 1996). "Flo Hyman Award goes to de Varona". USA Today (McLean, Virginia: Gannett Company). p. 6C. Retrieved March 9, 2011. (subscription required)
  13. ^ Shuster, Rachel (February 6, 1997). "Fit for King". USA Today (McLean, Virginia: Gannett Company). p. 1C. Retrieved March 9, 2011. (subscription required)
  14. ^ Leibowitz, Elissa (February 6, 1998). "Comaneci Vaults Back Into the Spotlight; Olympic Gymnast Receives Women's Sports Foundation Award". The Washington Post (The Washington Post Company). p. C2. Retrieved March 9, 2011. (subscription required)
  15. ^ White, Carolyn (February 4, 1999). "Blair wins off the ice, too". USA Today (McLean, Virginia: Gannett Company). p. 9C. Retrieved March 9, 2011. (subscription required)
  16. ^ "Plus: Sports Awards; Seles Is Honored For Her Comeback". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). February 10, 2000. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  17. ^ "W.N.B.A.; Leslie Is Winner Of Hyman Award". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). February 7, 2001. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  18. ^ Williams, Joe; Robbins, Josh (February 9, 2002). "Richardson is Honored". Orlando Sentinel (Tribune Company). p. 9. Retrieved March 9, 2011. (subscription required)
  19. ^ "Flo Hyman Memorial Award Presented to Olympic Gold Medalist Nawal El Moutawakel". International Olympic Committee. February 5, 2003. Retrieved March 9, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Sorenstam named Sportswoman of the Year". Philadelphia Daily News (Philadelphia Media Holdings). October 19, 2004. p. 66. 

External links[edit]