Florence Halop

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Florence Halop
Born (1923-01-23)January 23, 1923
Jamaica, Queens, New York
Died July 15, 1986(1986-07-15) (aged 63)
Los Angeles, California
Other names Flo Halop
Occupation Actress
Spouse(s) George Gruskin (19??-1976; his death; 2 daughters)

Florence Halop (January 23, 1923 – July 15, 1986) was an American actress. Best known for her role as the raspy-voiced bailiff Florence Kleiner on the sitcom Night Court,[1] Halop was the sister of Billy Halop, one of the original Dead End/East Side Kids.

Career[edit]

Born in Jamaica, Queens, New York, Halop had a long career on radio and got her start when she performed on Orson Welles' The Mercury Theatre on the Air. She transitioned to television in the early-1950s with a role in the series Meet Millie. After the series ended in 1956, Halop guest starred on various television series during the late 1950s and 1960s including roles in Playhouse 90, Going My Way, and I Spy.

Between 1976 - 1982, she played six different characters on the TV series Barney Miller. In 1984, she had a guest stint on St. Elsewhere. Halop’s character, Mrs. Hufnagel, was originally intended to be a one-episode spot,[1] but her role was so well received the writers found a way to get her into 15 more episodes over the course of the season.[1]

In 1985, Halop succeeded Selma Diamond as a bailiff on Night Court after Diamond's death from lung cancer. Halop herself also developed lung cancer and died during the series run.[1] She was replaced on Night Court by Marsha Warfield, who played Roz Russell until the series ended in 1992.[2]

Family[edit]

Halop was married to George Gruskin, who died in 1976. They were the parents of two daughters, Georgeanna and Benita. She is buried in Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery.

Filmography[edit]

Film
Year Film Role Notes
1939 Nancy Drew... Reporter Phyllis Gimble, Journalism Student Uncredited
1940 Junior G-Men Mary
1966 The Glass Bottom Boat Lady on Telephone Uncredited
Alternative title: The Spy in Lace Panties
Television
Year Title Role Notes
1951 Goodyear Television Playhouse 1 episode
Holiday Hotel Unknown episodes
1952 I Love Lucy Woman on Phone 1 episode
1952–1956 Meet Millie Mrs. Bronson 78 episodes
1958 Playhouse 90 Mrs. Laurie 1 episode
1959 The Untouchables Flora Weinberg 1 episode
1962 Saints and Sinners Ruth Melton Foss 1 episode
1963 Going My Way Mrs. Kravitz 1 episode
The Alfred Hitchcock Hour Jenny, Mr. Crawford's maid 1 episode
1965 The Dick Van Dyke Show Mrs. Spaulding 1 episode
Hank Mrs. Wallace 1 episode
1967 Captain Nice 1 episode
1967–1968 That Girl Clerk
Librarian
2 episodes
1968 I Spy Clara 1 episode
1970 The Mod Squad Nurse 1 episode
But I Don't Want to Get Married! Mrs. Green Television movie
1971 Allan Blanche Fisher Television movie
The Chicago Teddy Bears Mrs. Krausmeyer 1 episode
Love, American Style 2 episodes
1972 Insight 1 episode
Wait till Your Father Gets Home Voice 1 episode
The New Scooby-Doo Movies Voice 2 episodes
1974 Here's Lucy Old Woman 1 episode
1975 Queen of the Stardust Ballroom Sylvia Television movie
Police Woman Hannah Victor 1 episode
1976 Gemini Man Miss Evans 1 episode
All in the Family Martha Linfoot 1 episode
1976–1982 Barney Miller Various roles 6 episodes
1977 The Love Boat Millie Lindsay 1 episode
CHiPs Mrs. Abel 1 episode
The Betty White Show Marian 3 episodes
1977–1983 Alice Annie
Old Lady
2 episodes
1978 Soap Aunt Esther 1 episode
1979 Archie Bunker's Place Aunt Gussie 2 episodes
1979–1980 Angie Ceil 2 episodes
1980 This Is the Life Old Woman 1 episode
1982 Gimme a Break! Mrs. Falkenberg 1 episode
1983 Condo 1 episode
It Takes Two Florence 1 episode
Hill Street Blues Fish Store Customer 1 episode
1984 Diff'rent Strokes Mrs. Gruber 1 episode
Brothers Mrs. Veltnelman 1 episode
1984–1985 St. Elsewhere Mrs. Hufnagel 18 episodes
1985 Joanna Mrs. Benson Television movie
Anything for Love Claire Television movie
1985–1986 Night Court Bailiff Florence Kleiner 22 episodes

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Boyer, Edward J. (July 16, 1986). "Florence Halop of TV's 'Night Court' Dies at 63". Los Angeles Times. 
  2. ^ Littleton, Darryl (2008). Black Comedians on Black Comedy: How African-Americans Taught Us to Laugh. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 237. ISBN 1-55783-730-9. 

External links[edit]