Florence Nightingale Medal

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Florence Nightingale Medal
Florence Nightingale Medal.jpg
Obverse of the medal.
Awarded by Heads of State or Heads of Red Cross National Societies.
Type International nursing decoration (both military & civilian).
Awarded for "Exceptional courage and devotion to the wounded, sick or disabled or to civilian victims of a conflict or disaster" or "exemplary services or a creative and pioneering spirit in the areas of public health or nursing education".[1]
Status Currently awarded.
Description Gold & silver medallion with the inscription 'Ad memoriam Florence Nightingale 1820-1910' suspended from a red cross encircled by green laurel.
Post-nominals FNM
Statistics
Established 1912
First awarded 1920
Total awarded 1,408
Posthumous
awards
1
Distinct
recipients
1,408
ICRC Florence Nightingale Medal BAR.svg
Ribbon bar of the medal

At the Eighth International Conference of Red Cross Societies in London in 1907, the assembled delegates decided to create a commemorative International Nightingale Medal to be awarded to ladies distinguished in the nursing field. Subsequently, the Florence Nightingale Medal was instituted in 1912[2] by the International Committee of the Red Cross. It is the highest international distinction a nurse can achieve and is awarded to nurses or nursing aides for "exceptional courage and devotion to the wounded, sick or disabled or to civilian victims of a conflict or disaster" or "exemplary services or a creative and pioneering spirit in the areas of public health or nursing education".[1]

It was initially set up to be awarded to six nurses annually, although the first 42 awards were only made in 1920 because of the First World War.[3]

The medal was restricted to female nurses until regulation changes in 1991. Under the new regulations it is open to both women and men, and is awarded every two years to a maximum number of fifty recipients worldwide.[1] The vesica piscis-shaped medal is composed of gold & silver-gilt and bears a portrait of Florence Nightingale surrounded by the words 'Ad memoriam Florence Nightingale 1820-1910'. On the reverse, the name of the recipient and the date of the award are engraved, surrounded by the inscription 'Pro vera misericordia et cara humanitate perennis décor universalis' ('true and loving humanitarianism - a lasting general propriety'). The medal is attached to a white and red ribbon by a clasp featuring a red enamel cross encircled by a green laurel crown. Recipients are also presented with a parchment diploma of the award and, from 1927, a miniature version of the medal that could be more easily worn. The medal and a diploma are usually presented by the Head of State at a ceremony in their own country, which is required to have "a formal character, in keeping with the founders' wishes".[4]

In 2007, the 41st set of medals were awarded. The 35 recipients from 18 countries in that year, brought the total number of medals awarded to 1,309.[5]

In 2009, the 42nd set of medals were awarded. The 28 recipients from 15 countries in that year (including for the first time to an Afghan nurse), brought the total number of medals awarded to 1,337.[4]

In 2011, the 43rd set of medals were awarded. The 39 recipients from 19 countries in that year (including for the first time to two Kenyan nurses), brought the total number of medals awarded to 1376.[5]

In 2013, the 44th set of medals were awarded. The 32 recipients from 16 countries in that year (including one posthumously to a deceased delegate from the British Red Cross),[6] brought the total number of medals awarded to 1,408.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Florence Nightingale Medal". International Committee of the Red Cross. 2003. Retrieved 25 June 2010. 
  2. ^ "Medals and Badges: Florence Nightingale Medal". British Red Cross. Retrieved 17 October 2010. 
  3. ^ "The Florence Nightingale Medal". British Journal of Nursing: 334. 5 June 1920. Retrieved 25 June 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "Florence Nightingale Medal: 2009 recipients". International Committee of the Red Cross. 12 May 2009. Retrieved 25 June 2010. 
  5. ^ a b [http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/feature/florence-nightingale-recipients-feature-2007-05-13.htm /florence-nightingale-medal-nominations-120509 "Florence Nightingale Medal: 2007 recipients"]. International Committee of the Red Cross. 13 May 2007. Retrieved 13 May 2007. 
  6. ^ "Florence Nightingale Medal to aid worker Khalil Dale". BBC News. 18 May 2013. |accessdate=18 May 2013
  7. ^ "Florence Nightingale Medal: 2013 recipients". 12 May 2013.