Florence Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Florence Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Florence
Florence Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Florence Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Florence Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Florence Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°05′41″N 74°47′02″W / 40.094624°N 74.783817°W / 40.094624; -74.783817Coordinates: 40°05′41″N 74°47′02″W / 40.094624°N 74.783817°W / 40.094624; -74.783817[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 7, 1872
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Craig H. Wilkie (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Richard A. Brook[4]
 • Clerk Joy Weiler[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 10.177 sq mi (26.360 km2)
 • Land 9.780 sq mi (25.331 km2)
 • Water 0.397 sq mi (1.029 km2)  3.90%
Area rank 210th of 566 in state
20th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 39 ft (12 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 12,109
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 12,356
 • Rank 202nd of 566 in state
12th of 40 in county[12]
 • Density 1,238.1/sq mi (478.0/km2)
 • Density rank 356th of 566 in state
22nd of 40 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08518[13][14]
Area code(s) 609 exchange: 499[15]
FIPS code 3400523850[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882107[18][2]
Website www.florence-nj.gov

Florence Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 12,109,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,363 (+12.7%) from the 10,746 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 480 (+4.7%) from the 10,266 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Florence was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1872, from portions of Mansfield Township.[20]

Florence CDP (with a 2010 Census population of 4,426[8]) and Roebling (3,715[21]) are census-designated places (CDPs) and unincorporated communities located within the township.[22][23][24] As of the 2000 Census, the CDP's population was 8,200.[25] Up to and including the 2000 United States Census, the two CDPs had been combined as Florence-Roebling,[24] which had a total population of 8,200 in 2000.[26]

Geography[edit]

Florence Township is located at 40°05′41″N 74°47′02″W / 40.094624°N 74.783817°W / 40.094624; -74.783817 (40.094624,-74.783817). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 10.177 square miles (26.360 km2), of which, 9.780 square miles (25.331 km2) of it was land and 0.397 square miles (1.029 km2) of it (3.90%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,528
1890 1,922 25.8%
1900 1,955 1.7%
1910 4,731 142.0%
1920 7,100 50.1%
1930 7,824 10.2%
1940 7,229 −7.6%
1950 7,455 3.1%
1960 8,127 9.0%
1970 8,560 5.3%
1980 9,084 6.1%
1990 10,266 13.0%
2000 10,746 4.7%
2010 12,109 12.7%
Est. 2013 12,356 [11] 2.0%
Population sources: 1880-2000[27]
1880-1920[28] 1880-1890[29]
1890-1910[30] 1910-1930[31]
1930-1990[32]
2000[25][33] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 12,109 people, 4,775 households, and 3,285 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,238.1 per square mile (478.0 /km2). There were 5,053 housing units at an average density of 516.6 per square mile (199.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 78.43% (9,497) White, 12.23% (1,481) Black or African American, 0.19% (23) Native American, 5.04% (610) Asian, 0.06% (7) Pacific Islander, 1.00% (121) from other races, and 3.06% (370) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.76% (576) of the population.[8]

There were 4,775 households, of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.7% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.07.[8]

In the township, 22.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $75,219 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,776) and the median family income was $88,479 (+/- $5,289). Males had a median income of $54,010 (+/- $3,496) versus $47,707 (+/- $2,587) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,871 (+/- $1,737). About 1.4% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 10,746 people, 4,149 households, and 2,891 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,106.5 people per square mile (427.3/km²). There were 4,391 housing units at an average density of 452.1 per square mile (174.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 85.52% White, 9.74% African American, 0.18% Native American, 2.35% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 1.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.35% of the population.[25][33]

There were 4,149 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.3% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.[25][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 31.9% from 25 to 44, 23.6% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.1 males.[25][33]

The median income for a household in the township was $56,843, and the median income for a family was $67,412. Males had a median income of $45,325 versus $31,215 for females. The per capita income for the township was $23,529. About 4.8% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.[25][33]

History[edit]

The Florence City Company, formed in 1849, organized the original layout of lots and streets in Florence. It also oversaw construction of the Florence Hotel and wharf.[35] The Florence Iron Works was established in 1857 along the Delaware River by Richard Jones.[36] It continued as a major force in the economy of the community, especially after ownership was transferred to Richard D. Wood in 1867.[35] In 1900 the U.S. Census revealed that a good portion of the workforce was dependent on the foundry.[37]

Florence was soon recognized as an attractive vacation spot with sandy beaches.[35] Visitors could also partake of hydrotherapy offered by a center established about 1872 by Dr. Trall of Philadelphia.[35]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Florence Township is governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under Plan F of the Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council) system of municipal government. implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1972.[38][39] The governing body consists of a mayor and a five-member Township Council. Under this form of government the voters participate in partisan elections to choose a Mayor for a four-year term, along two Council members At-Large and one Council members from each of three wards for overlapping terms of four years. The legislative power is vested in the Council and the Executive power is vested in the Mayor. The Mayor appoints a professionally qualified Business Administrator with the advice and consent of Council.[6]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Florence Township is Republican Craig H. Wilkie, whose terms of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Florence Township Council are Council President Theodore J. "Ted" Lovenduski (at-large; R, 2015), Council Vice President Paul C. Ostrander (at-large; R, 2015), Frank K. Baldorossi, Jr. (Ward 1; R, 2017), Jerry Sandusky (Ward 3; R, 2017) and David Woolston (Ward 2; R, 2017).[4][40][41]

The Township Business Administrator is Richard A. Brook and the Township Clerk is Joy Weiler.[4]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Florence Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[9][43][44] Prior to the 2010 Census, Florence Township had been part of the 4th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[45]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[49][50]

The 7th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Delanco Township) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[54] The board choose a director and deputy director from among its seven members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[54] As of 2013, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2013; Cinnaminson Township),[55] Deputy Director Leah Arter (R, 2014; Moorestown Township),[56] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[57] Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[58] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[59][54]

Education[edit]

The Florence Township School District serves public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,593 students and 128.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.43:1.[60] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[61]) are Roebling Elementary School[62] (K–3; 499 students), Riverfront School[63] (4-8; 641) and Florence Township Memorial High School[64] (9–12; 543).[65]

Students from Florence Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[66]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 67.24 miles (108.21 km) of roadways, of which 45.31 miles (72.92 km) are maintained by the municipality, 14.11 miles (22.71 km) by Burlington County and 4.52 miles (7.27 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.30 miles (5.31 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[67]

Florence hosts the New Jersey Turnpike, which extends from Bordentown Township on the west and continues for 3.3 miles (5.3 km) into Mansfield Township.[68]

The section includes Interchange 6A on the Pennsylvania Extension, which had been connected with Cedar Lane at an odd roadway setup (where Cedar Lane overpasses itself) the locals term the "whirlybird" until 1999, when the Authority constructed a double-trumpet interchange at US 130.[69] The 6 toll gate is just east of Exit 6A on the Pennsylvania Extension. Interchange 6 (itself) is located in Mansfield Township.[70]

Other highways and roads in the township include Interstate 295 U.S. Route 130 and County Route 543.

Public transportation[edit]

The New Jersey Transit River Line light rail system offers service in the township at Florence station at U.S. Route 130[71] and Roebling station at Hornberger Avenue[72] providing southbound service to Camden and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (with transfers available to the PATCO Speedline) and northbound service to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to New Jersey Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia, and Amtrak trains on the Northeast Corridor.[73]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service on the 409 route between Trenton and Philadelphia.[74][75]

BurLink bus service is offered on the B5 route between the Florence light rail station and Haines Industrial Center.[76]

Media[edit]

WIFI, 1460 AM, is a radio station broadcasting out of Florence Township. It has a Christian Contemporary format.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Florence Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c Mayor and Township Council, Florence Township. Accessed July 1, 2014.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Township of Florence. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Florence, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Florence township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Florence township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 15, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Florence, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Florence, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 96. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Roebling CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  22. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  23. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  24. ^ a b New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, p. III-3, August 2012. Accessed June 17, 2013. "Burlington County — Annexations from MCDs: Medford Lakes borough from Medford township; New CDPs: Florence (formed from part of deleted Florence-Roebling CDP), Juliustown (formed from part of Fort Dix CDP and additional area), and Roebling (formed from part of deleted Florence-Roebling CDP); Deleted CDPs: Florence-Roebling (split to form Florence and Roebling CDPs)"
  25. ^ a b c d e f Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Florence township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  26. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 from Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Florence-Roebling CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  27. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  28. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  29. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  30. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  31. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  32. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Florence township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 17, 2013.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Florence township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 19, 2012.
  35. ^ a b c d "HISTORY OF FLORENCE AND ROEBLING". Township of Florence. Florence Township Office. Retrieved 2 Mar 2013. 
  36. ^ "Florence Iron Works". RootsWeb. Ancestyry.com. 
  37. ^ "Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Florence, Burlington, New Jersey". 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Ancestry.com. 
  38. ^ Form of Municipal Government, Township of Florence. Accessed August 15, 2013. "Florence Township is governed under the provisions of the Mayor-Council Plan F of the Faulkner Act, Chapter 210 of the 1971 laws of the State of New Jersey as amended (N.J.S.A. 40:69A-1, et seq.)."
  39. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  40. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, November 18, 2011. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  41. ^ November 3, 2009 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey, May 4, 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  42. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  46. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  47. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  49. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  50. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  51. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  52. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  53. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  54. ^ a b c Staff. Meet the Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  55. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  56. ^ Leah Arter, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  57. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  58. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  59. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  60. ^ District information for Florence Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 1, 2014.
  61. ^ School Data for the Florence Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 1, 2014.
  62. ^ Roebling Elementary School, Florence Township School District. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  63. ^ Riverfront School, Florence Township School District. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  64. ^ Florence Township Memorial High School, Florence Township School District. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  65. ^ New Jersey School Directory, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 15, 2013.
  66. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  67. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  68. ^ Interstate 95 / New Jersey Turnpike Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, October 2001. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  69. ^ Wilson, David E. "Turnpike Access Roadwork Set To Begin In Fall The Project Consists Of Building Ramps Between Route 130 And The N.j. Turnpike's Pa. Extension.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 11, 1997. Accessed November 25, 2013. "The dairy's garage sits on Cedar Lane, part of the ``whirlybird of local roads that drivers heading north on Route 130 wend through to get onto the New Jersey Turnpike's Pennsylvania Extension, the connection between the New Jersey and Pennsylvania Turnpikes.... Contractors are set to break ground this fall on a series of ramps between Route 130 and the extension, part of a new Exit 6 that will sit east of Route 130."
  70. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  71. ^ Florence station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  72. ^ Roebling station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  73. ^ River LINE System map, New Jersey Transit. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  74. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  75. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  76. ^ BurLink Schedules, Cross County Connection. Accessed November 25, 2013.
  77. ^ Joseph Bodner 1925-1982, Artistic Gallery, Accessed November 25, 2013. "Joseph Bodner was born January 16, 1925 in Florence, NJ. He died on May 28, 1982 in Sherman Oaks, CA."
  78. ^ DeCastro, Lavinia. "Limits on state spending urged in 7th Dist.", Courier-Post, October 22, 2007. Accessed June 19, 2012. "Democrat Rich Dennison, 30, of Florence, who was once a speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton, is challenging incumbent Republican Sen. Diane Allen."
  79. ^ Ginburg, Yana. "Burlco State Sen. John E. Dimon, 77", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 21, 1993. Accessed November 25, 2013. "The son of immigrants from what is now the Czech Republic, Mr. Dimon was born in Robeling on May 14, 1916. He lived in the Robeling-Florence area all his life."
  80. ^ Sheneman, Drew. "Chatting with DC Comics cover artist Adam Hughes", The Star-Ledger, October 7, 2010. Accessed November 25, 2013. "A. I was born in Riverside, and spent my whole growing-up years in Florence, a little township on the Delaware River. I tell people that I'm from the West Coast of New Jersey."
  81. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "Richard J. Hughes, Governor and Judge, Dies at 83", The New York Times, December 8, 1992. Accessed December 23, 2007. "Mr. Hughes was born August 10, 1909, in Florence, a town on the Delaware River a few miles south of Trenton."
  82. ^ Wali Lundy profile, Fox Sports (USA). Accessed September 4, 2006.
  83. ^ Zygo, Brian. "New Jersey – The Garden State with Soccer Roots", MLS Talk, June 2, 2009. Accessed February 3, 2013. "Gene Olaff, considered by some to be one of the greatest American goalkeepers, was born in Bayonne, New Jersey in 1920.... Olaff currently lives in Florence Township, New Jersey, where he’s actively involved in youth soccer."
  84. ^ Staff. "Putting In for Overtime: Cornell Stuns Princeton", The New York Times, September 22, 1996. Accessed November 18, 2007.
  85. ^ Fisher, Rich. "Florence Football Star Takes Right Steps Toward College A Knee Injury Almost Sidelined Brian Opre. A Second Opinion Was The Key.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, April 27, 1993. Accessed June 19, 2012. "Combining those lessons with a strong passing arm has helped the Florence senior quarterback get acceptance to Cornell for the fall. It will be the best of both worlds for Opre, whose first consideration in picking a college was academics."

External links[edit]