Florham Park, New Jersey

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Florham Park, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Florham Park
Map highlighting Florham Park's location within Morris County. Inset: Morris County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Florham Park's location within Morris County. Inset: Morris County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Florham Park, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Florham Park, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°46′33″N 74°23′39″W / 40.775832°N 74.394058°W / 40.775832; -74.394058Coordinates: 40°46′33″N 74°23′39″W / 40.775832°N 74.394058°W / 40.775832; -74.394058[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated March 9, 1899
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor R. Scott Eveland (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator William F. Huyler[4]
 • Clerk Sheila A. Williams[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 7.540 sq mi (19.528 km2)
 • Land 7.288 sq mi (18.875 km2)
 • Water 0.252 sq mi (0.652 km2)  3.34%
Area rank 236th of 566 in state
20th of 39 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 217 ft (66 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 11,696
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 11,831
 • Rank 208th of 566 in state
16th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 1,604.9/sq mi (619.7/km2)
 • Density rank 326th of 566 in state
17th of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07932[13][14]
Area code(s) 973[15]
FIPS code 3402723910[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885221[18][2]
Website www.florhamparkboro.net

Florham Park is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 11,696,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 2,839 (+32.1%) from the 8,857 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 336 (+3.9%) from the 8,521 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Florham Park was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 9, 1899, from portions of Chatham Township.[20]

The National Football League's New York Jets relocated their main headquarters in 2008 to the Atlantic Health Jets Training Center, located in Florham Park. The Jets relocated to Florham Park from their old facilities at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. The team holds its day-to-day operations during the year in Florham Park, while relocating during July and August to Cortland, NY for training camp. Florham Park beat out Berkeley Heights, Jersey City, Millburn, South Amboy, and Wood-Ridge, which had all been finalists contending to be the host of the new facility.[21]

Florham Park is the North American headquarters for the BASF corporation, the world's largest chemical company.[22]

Geography[edit]

Florham Park is located at 40°46′33″N 74°23′39″W / 40.775832°N 74.394058°W / 40.775832; -74.394058 (40.775832,-74.394058). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 7.540 square miles (19.528 km2), of which, 7.288 square miles (18.875 km2) of it was land and 0.252 square miles (0.652 km2) of it (3.34%) was water.[1][2]

The Borough of Florham Park is located in southeastern Morris County and is bordered on the south by Madison and Chatham Boroughs; on the north by Hanover and East Hanover Townships; on the west by Morris Township; and on the east by the Passaic River.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 752
1910 558 −25.8%
1920 570 2.2%
1930 1,269 122.6%
1940 1,609 26.8%
1950 2,385 48.2%
1960 7,222 202.8%
1970 8,094 12.1%
1980 9,359 15.6%
1990 8,521 −9.0%
2000 8,857 3.9%
2010 11,696 32.1%
Est. 2013 11,831 [11] 1.2%
Population sources: 1900-1920[23]
1900-1910[24] 1910-1930[25]
1930-1990[26] 2000[27][28] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 11,696 people, 4,003 households, and 2,798 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,604.9 per square mile (619.7 /km2). There were 4,201 housing units at an average density of 576.4 per square mile (222.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 86.35% (10,099) White, 4.35% (509) Black or African American, 0.07% (8) Native American, 6.37% (745) Asian, 0.07% (8) Pacific Islander, 1.10% (129) from other races, and 1.69% (198) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.08% (594) of the population.[8]

There were 4,003 households, of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 26.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.03.[8]

In the borough, 19.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 18.9% from 18 to 24, 20.7% from 25 to 44, 24.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.1 years. For every 100 females there were 83.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.4 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $106,227 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,030) and the median family income was $121,316 (+/- $8,544). Males had a median income of $92,857 (+/- $17,466) versus $61,331 (+/- $12,613) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $46,564 (+/- $4,867). About 0.5% of families and 2.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.[29]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 8,857 people, 3,239 households, and 2,474 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,191.3 people per square mile (460.3/km2). There were 3,342 housing units at an average density of 449.5 per square mile (173.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.00% White, 0.99% African American, 0.01% Native American, 3.87% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.15% of the population.[27][28]

There were 3,239 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.05.[27][28]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 20.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 86.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.6 males.[27][28]

The median income for a household in the borough was $88,706, and the median income for a family was $102,047. Males had a median income of $74,410 versus $49,551 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $42,133. About 2.4% of families and 5.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 11.9% of those age 65 or over.[27][28]

History[edit]

200-year-old oak tree at Brooklake Country Club in Florham Park, New Jersey

The area that is now Florham Park was first settled by the English sometime between 1680 and 1700, and the community was long recognized as a prime farming area. The area was known for the manufacture of quality brooms, which was the source of one of its names, Broomtown. Through its history, the area was known as Hoppingtown, Broomtown, Columbia, Afton, and finally Florham Park.[30] It was part of Hanover Township, then Chatham Township before being incorporated as Florham Park in 1899.[20]

Florence Adele Vanderbilt Twombly (1854–1952), granddaughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt, renowned as the richest man in America, and her husband, financier, Hamilton McKown Twombly, came to the Morris County countryside in 1887, joining over 100 other millionaires who owned sprawling country retreats. They fancied an English-style country mansion in a stately park setting. "Florham," built on 840 acres (3.4 km2), one of America's finest Gilded Age homes, was the result. The couple named their new estate "Florham," a combination of their first names, Florence and Hamilton. The second part to the name "Florham Park" received its name from a second mansion in town that was on about 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of land situated where the current Brooklake Country Club is located. Owned by Dr. Leslie Ward — one of the founders of the Prudential Insurance Company and the first vice president of the company — it was named "Brooklake Park", partially because of the beautiful lake that was on the property.[31]

Both of these families were supporters of many civic projects including the petitioning of the State of New Jersey to create their own town. After the legislature voted on March 9, 1899, the governor signed the bill on March 20, making Florham Park a borough.[20] The new town was named after Florence and Hamilton Twombly's and Dr. Ward's estates.[31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Florham Park is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Florham Park is Republican Mark Taylor, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Scott Carpenter (R, 2015), Carmen Cefolo-Pane (R, 2015), Charles Germershausen (R, 2014), Charles Malone (R, 2014), Thomas Michalowski (R, 2016) and William Zuckerman (R, 2016).[32][33]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Florham Park is located in the 11th Congressional District[34] and is part of New Jersey's 27th state legislative district.[9][35][36] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Florham Park had been in the 26th state legislative district.[37]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[38] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[39][40] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[41][42]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 27th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Richard Codey (D, Roseland) and in the General Assembly by Mila Jasey (D, South Orange) and John F. McKeon (D, West Orange).[43][44] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[45] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[46]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[47] As of 2011, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director William J. Chegwidden (Wharton),[48] Deputy Freeholder Director Douglas R. Cabana (Boonton Township),[49] Gene F. Feyl (Denville),[50] Ann F. Grassi (Parsippany-Troy Hills),[51] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (Montville),[52] John J. Murphy (Morris Township)[53] and Hank Lyon (Montville Township),[54][55]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,111 registered voters in Florham Park, of which 1,319 (18.5%) were registered as Democrats, 3,035 (42.7%) were registered as Republicans and 2,756 (38.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[56]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 59.2% of the vote here (3,384 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 39.7% (2,270 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (39 votes), among the 5,716 ballots cast by the borough's 7,330 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.0%.[57] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 61.4% of the vote here (3,382 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 37.8% (2,082 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (28 votes), among the 5,509 ballots cast by the borough's 7,176 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.8.[58]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 61.7% of the vote here (2,410 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 29.6% (1,155 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 7.8% (304 votes) and other candidates with 0.1% (5 votes), among the 3,903 ballots cast by the borough's 7,118 registered voters, yielding a 54.8% turnout.[59]

Education[edit]

The Florham Park School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's three schools had an enrollment of 1,009 students and 86.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.72:1.[60] The schools in the district (with 2011-12 school enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[61]) are Briarwood Elementary School[62] (grades PreK-2, 333 students), Brooklake Elementary School[63] (3-5, 337) and Ridgedale Middle School[64] (6-8, 339).[65][66]

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades are served by the Hanover Park Regional High School District, attending Hanover Park High School in East Hanover, together with students from East Hanover Township. The district also serves students from the neighboring community of Hanover Township at Whippany Park High School in the Whippany section of Hanover Township.[67]

Saint Anne Villa

Holy Family School is a Catholic school operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. The school opened in 1954 with 173 students and reached a peak enrollment of 700 in the 1960s.[68][69]

Portions of the College of Saint Elizabeth campus are in Florham Park, including the Villa of Saint Ann, a classical Greek amphitheater built into a hillside, and the original dairy farm for the complex. Portions of the Fairleigh Dickinson University campus, College at Florham, also are located in Florham Park.[70]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Florham Park include:

Appearance in film[edit]

  • In Not Another Teen Movie, during the airport scene towards the bottom of the screen a flight on "Jersey Air" is scheduled to leave for Florham Park, NJ, inserted as an homage to some of the film's crew who hail from Morris County.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough of Florham Park. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  5. ^ Office of the Municipal Clerk, Borough of Florham Park. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 121.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Florham Park, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Florham Park borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Florham Park borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Florham Park, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Florham Park, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 22, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 193. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  21. ^ Jets Choose Florham Park for New Headquarters, 1010-WINS, March 30, 2006.
  22. ^ Welcome to BASF in North America, BASF. Accessed April 24, 2012. "BASF Corporation, headquartered in Florham Park, New Jersey, is the North American affiliate of BASF SE, based in Ludwigshafen, Germany. BASF has approximately 16,400 employees in North America, and had sales of $17.7 billion in 2010."
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 12, 2013.
  24. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed June 22, 2012.
  25. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  26. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Florham Park borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  28. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Florham Park borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2012.
  29. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Florham Park borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  30. ^ Chartier, John. "FLORHAM PARK WAS FOUNDED BY ANGER OVER TAXES", Daily Record (Morristown), March 30, 1999. Accessed April 24, 2012.
  31. ^ a b Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Florham Park; Good Schools, Yes, but Low Taxes, Too", The New York Times, October 30, 1994. Accessed April 24, 2012. "The name 'Florham' is a combination of the first syllables of the names of Florence and Hamilton Twombley. The word 'Park' came from the Ward estate, which was called Brooklake Park."
  32. ^ Borough Council, Borough of Florham Park. Accessed July 1, 2014.
  33. ^ Morris County Manual 2013, p. 35. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  34. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  39. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  41. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  42. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  44. ^ District 27 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 18, 2014.
  45. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  46. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  48. ^ William J. Chegwidden, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  49. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  50. ^ Gene F. Feyl, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  51. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  52. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  53. ^ John J. Murphy, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  54. ^ Hank Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  55. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  56. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  57. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  58. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  59. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  60. ^ District information for Florham Park School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 1, 2014.
  61. ^ School data for the Florham Park School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 1, 2014.
  62. ^ Briarwood Elementary School, Florham Park School District. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  63. ^ Brooklake Elementary School, Florham Park School District. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  64. ^ Ridgedale Middle School, Florham Park School District. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  65. ^ Schools, Florham Park School District. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  66. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Florham Park School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  67. ^ "Hanover Park Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 13, 2013. "The Hanover Park Regional High School District is comprised of two high schools. Hanover Park High School is located in East Hanover, receives students from East Hanover and Florham Park, and has an enrollment of 893 students."
  68. ^ Our History, Holy Family School. Accessed October 12, 2013.
  69. ^ Morris County Elementary / Secondary Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed October 13, 2013.
  70. ^ Staff. "Florham Park", FDU Magazine, Fall / Winter 2001. Accessed April 24, 2012. "In 1899, led by Mother Mary Xavier, the Sisters of Charity established the College of St. Elizabeth, the first New Jersey college to grant degrees of higher education to women. In 1901, the college’s first building, Xavier Hall, was constructed, and it now serves as the main building for the Academy of St. Elizabeth. Florham Park solidified its reputation as a college town when Fairleigh Dickinson University purchased the splendid Twombly estate and opened a campus in 1958."
  71. ^ Wilson, David McKay. "Making Masterpieces", Bowdoin Magazine, Spring 2004. Accessed August 27, 2008.
  72. ^ James, George. "IN PERSON; The New Jersey Chronicles", The New York Times, May 10, 1998. Accessed December 18, 2012. "One recent morning, Mr. Cunningham, who had traveled from his home in Florham Park, Morris County, stood on the campus at Stevens Institute of Technology here, being videotaped for a New Jersey Network historical series called New Jersey Legacy, to be broadcast around Christmas."
  73. ^ Pearce, Jeremy. "IN PERSON; Don't Call Him a Historian", The New York Times, January 5, 2003. Accessed December 18, 2012. "'A century passes and it's not so long ago,' reflected John T. Cunningham, whose words were formed slowly and seemed to float for a moment before him.... For half a century, the words of the Florham Park social historian have reached children studying his textbooks and touched readers exploring his broader histories of the Garden State."
  74. ^ Matzner, Frank A. "Mark Guiliana: New Beats ", All About Jazz, April 8, 2008. Accessed May 27, 2014. "All About Jazz: You were born and raised in New Jersey, correct?... MG: I went to school at William Paterson. I'm from Morris County, a town called Florham Park."
  75. ^ "Bill Raftery to receive Curt Gowdy Media Award", CBS SportsLine.com. Accessed July 3, 2007. "Raftery lives in Florham Park, N.J., with his wife, Joan, and has four children and one grandchild."
  76. ^ Super Bowl notebook, St. Petersburg Times by Bruce Lowitt, January 18, 2001. "New Jersey native Tony Siragusa, a Ravens defensive tackle and resident of Florham Park, N.J., and Giants defensive end Michael Strahan, who lives in nearby Montclair, N.J., have been good friends since meeting two years ago at several charity functions."

External links[edit]