Flowers of Edinburgh

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"Flowers of Edinburgh"
Flowers of Edinburgh Public domain.jpg
Published in 477 tune books

"Flowers of Edinburgh" is a traditional fiddle tune of Gaelic lineage, Irish and Scottish. It is also prominent in American fiddle, Canadian fiddle and wherever old time fiddle is cultivated.

History[edit]

According to a self-deprecating secondary report in "A Native's Guide to Edinburgh" By Tom Mc Rae,[1] "The stench from the loch permeated the old City and probably gave rise to the traditional tune "The Flowers of Edinburgh." A more neutral perspective suggests that the tune "dates from near 1740, may have been written by Oswald though he didn't claim this."[2]

Technical[edit]

G Major (one sharp)

Recordings[edit]

A few of the many notable recordings of a tune by this name:

  • 50 Fiddle Solos by Aly Bain
  • Father's Of The Newfoundland Fiddle Volume 1 by Rufus Guinchard
  • Fiddle by Cape Breton Symphony
  • Irish Folk The Collection Vol.2 by Various Artists
  • Jefferson And Liberty by The Itinerant Band
  • O'er Hills O'er Mountains by The Strathallan Early Music Group
  • Rig-a-jig-jig: Dance Music Of The South Of England by Various Artists
  • Rogha Scoil Samhraidh Willie Clancy 2007 by Various Artists
  • Shetland Fiddle Music by School Of Scottish Studies, University Of Edinburgh
  • Shetland Springs Fae Da Bonnie Isle by Gibbie Hutchison
  • Souvenir Of Scotland by Hamish MacGregor And The Blue Bonnets
  • Strict Tempo: Scottish Country Dance Music From The 1950s, Volume 1 by Adam Rennie And His Scottish Country Dance Quartet
  • The Cat That Ate The Candle by John Carty And Brian McGrath
  • The Devils Of Dublin by Celtic Music Society (East Rochester HS)
  • The Fiddlesticks Collection by Jerry Holland
  • Traditional Irish Fiddle Music by The Kilfenora Fiddle Ceili Band
  • Vivacious by Samantha Robichaud

Other names[edit]

Blata Duin-Eudain, Knuckle Down, My Love Was Once A Bonnie Lad, My Love's Bonny When She Smiles On Me, To The Battle Men Of Erin, The Weobley Hankie Dance, The Weobley Hanky Dance.[3]

Bibliographys[edit]

  • Captain Simon Fraser's Airs and Melodies Peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland (1816 )

See also[edit]

Videographic documentation[edit]

  • Proper performance Ashley MacIsaac's February 20, 2010 concert in Victoria, with guests Qristina and Quinn Bachand. Also featuring Bryan Skinner on bodhran and Jason King on whistle.
  • Sometimes played in D Major.Title: Flowers of Edinburgh & Spootiskerry - Ashley MacIsaac & The Bachands
  • Dance tune. Lopez Island 2008

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Native's Guide to Edinburgh|Tom Mc Rae, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia|©2007 This article appeared previously in Lowlands-L Travels
  2. ^ "The Flowers of Edinburgh". Bouzouki GDAE. 23 June 2011. Retrieved 5 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "The Flowers Of Edinburgh barndance". The Session. Retrieved 5 July 2013.