Flying Tiger (Marvel Comics)

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Flying Tiger
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Spider-Woman #40 (Oct 1981)
Created by Chris Claremont
Steve Leialoha
Bob Wiacek
In-story information
Team affiliations Masters of Evil

Flying Tiger is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain.

Publication history[edit]

Flying Tiger first appeared in Spider-Woman #40 (October 1981), and was created by Chris Claremont and Steve Leialoha.

The character subsequently appears in Spider-Woman #50 (June 1983), Iron Man #177 (December 1983), Fantastic Four #335 (December 1989), Avengers Spotlight #29 (February 1990), Captain America #411 (January 1993), #413 (March 1993), Thunderbolts #3 (June 1997), #18-20 (September–November 1998), #22 (January 1999), #24-25 (March–April 1999), and Avengers: The Initiative Annual #1 (January 2008).

Flying Tiger received an entry in the All-New Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe A to Z: Update #2 (2007).

Fictional character biography[edit]

Flying Tiger's true identity is unknown. A professional football player whose career was cut short, he developed a costume that enabled him to fly. He started his criminal career as a mercenary assassin when he was hired to kill the original Spider-Woman.[1]

Flying Tiger was among the superhuman individuals that were abducted by Locksmith and Tick-Tock where they were placed in Locksmith's prison. When in his cell, Flying Tiger felt claustrophobic. He was later freed by Spider-Woman and Gypsy Moth where Flying Tiger escaped.[2]

General Nguyen Ngoc Coy later recommended Flying Tiger to his South American rebel allies. He was later hired to abduct businessmen Regis Fussky and deposit him at a base in South America. As part of an agreement with Kingpin, Flying Tiger is not to abduct Regis Fussky until he was out of the United States. Regis Fussky hired Iron Man (James Rhodes) into being his bodyguard while Flying Tiger replaced the co-pilot of Regis Fussky's airplane. Once the airplane is over South America, Flying Tiger emerged from the cockpit and grabbed Regis Fussky while grabbing the suitcase that contained the Iron Man armor. James Rhodes escaped in a parachute as Flying Tiger delivered Regis Fussky to his employers. Flying Tiger then flirted with a woman who couldn't open the suitcase and threw it into the jungle. James Rhodes was able to recover the suitcase and transformed into Iron Man. During Flying Tiger's fight with Iron Man, the US government began dropping bombs on Colonel Perez's camp. Flying Tiger was caught in one of the explosions. Iron Man rescued Regis Fussky and took down the fleeing Flying Tiger.[3]

During the Acts of Vengeance, Doctor Doom used an Aggression Enhancer on Flying Tiger and other villains to attack the Fantastic Four when they stood before congress. They were defeated by the Fantastic Four.[4]

Flying Tiger was next seen being admitted into the Vault following a massive prison escape attempt.[5]

Later, Flying Tiger joined the Crimson Cowl's Masters of Evil. The group's plot to blackmail the governments of the world using a weather-controlling machine was stopped by the Thunderbolts.[6]

Later in San Francisco, Flying Tiger was defeated by Armory.[7]

During the Fear Itself storyline, Flying Tiger was seen trying to escape from the demolished Raft until he ran into the Avengers Academy staff.[8]

Equipment[edit]

Flying Tiger wears body armor under a tiger costume, and is capable of powered flight. He has enhanced strength, durability, endurance and a set of claws.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Spider-Woman #40
  2. ^ Spider-Woman #50
  3. ^ Iron Man #177
  4. ^ Fantastic Four #335
  5. ^ Avengers Spotlight #29
  6. ^ Thunderbolts #18-25
  7. ^ Avengers: The Initiative Annual #1/2
  8. ^ Avengers Academy #15

External links[edit]