Fokker D.IV

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D.IV
Fokker D.IV.jpg
Role Fighter
Manufacturer Fokker
Designer Martin Kreutzer
Introduction 1916[1]
Primary users German Army
Swedish Air Force
Number built 44

The Fokker D.IV was a German fighter biplane of World War I, a development of the D.I. It had a more powerful Mercedes D.III engine, and the first Fokker front-line design to use ailerons in place of wing warping from the start for roll control.[2] The aircraft was purchased in small numbers (40) by the German Army and the Swedish Air Force bought 4.[1]

Operators[edit]

 German Empire
 Sweden

Specifications[edit]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one pilot
  • Length: 6.30 m (21 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.70 m (31 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 2.45 m (8 ft 0 in)
  • Wing area: 21.0 m2 (226 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 600 kg (1,320 lb)
  • Gross weight: 840 kg (1,848 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III straight-6, 120 kW (160 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 160 km/h (99[3] mph)
  • Range: 220 km (137 miles)
  • Rate of climb: 5.6 m/s (1,100; 20 minutes to 13,100 Ft. ft/min)

Armament

  • 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 399. 
  • World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 894 Sheet 40–41. 
  • Green, William; Gordon Swanborough (1994). The Complete Book of Fighters. London: Greenwich Editions. p. 221. 
  • Lamberton, W. M. (1960). Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War. Letchworth,Herts: Harleyford Publications Limited. p. 218. 
  1. ^ a b "Germany - 1916 Fokker D.IV". Blogspot. Retrieved 15 March 2012. 
  2. ^ Wagner, Ray; Nowarra, Heinz (1971). German Combat Planes: A Comprehensive Survey and History of the Development of German Military Aircraft from 1914 to 1945. New York City: Doubleday. p. 63. 
  3. ^ Wagner, Ray; Nowarra, Heinz (1971). German Combat Planes: A Comprehensive Survey and History of the Development of German Military Aircraft from 1914 to 1945. New York City: Doubleday. p. 63.