Follow Me Quietly

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Follow Me Quietly
FollowmequietlyPoster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by
Produced by Herman Schlom
Screenplay by Lillie Hayward
Story by
Starring
Music by
  • Leonid Raab
  • Paul Sawtell
Cinematography Robert De Grasse
Edited by Elmo Williams
Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures
Release dates
  • July 7, 1949 (1949-07-07) (Premiere-New York City)[1]
  • July 14, 1949 (1949-07-14) (US)[1]
Running time
60 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Follow Me Quietly is a 1949 semidocumentary film noir directed by Richard Fleischer, with support from Anthony Mann in an uncredited position. The drama features William Lundigan, Dorothy Patrick, Jeff Corey, and others.

Plot[edit]

A mysterious killer, known only as "The Judge," kills anyone he considers worthless. Detective Harry Grant is assigned to track him down. With just a handful of clues, Grant constructs a faceless dummy to help his men conduct their investigation.

Police finally break the case after receiving an important clue. Finally, after cornering the killer during a chase on the catwalks of a refinery, the killer is revealed to be a middle-aged man whose cruel disposition and unattractive appearance lead him to become "The Judge."

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

The New York Times was dismissive of the film and wrote, "There is no intelligent reason why anyone should heed the proposal of Follow Me Quietly...[f]or this utterly senseless little thriller is patently nothing more than a convenient one-hour time-killer between performances of the eight-act vaudeville bill."[2] Reviewing it on DVD, Gene Triplett of The Oklahoman wrote, "[T]his obscure gem packs a remarkable amount of thrills and dramatic weight into a mere 59 minutes".[3] Paul Mavis of DVD Talk rated it 4.5/5 stars and called it a "strange, unsettling film noir mystery, with a disturbing subtext".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Follow Me Quietly: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved May 13, 2014. 
  2. ^ The New York Times. Film review, July 8, 1949. Last accessed: February 7, 2008.
  3. ^ Triplett, Gene (August 19, 2011). "DVD review: 'Follow Me Quietly'". The Oklahoman. Retrieved February 20, 2015. 
  4. ^ Mavis, Paul (August 15, 2011). "Follow Me Quietly (Warner Archive)". DVD Talk. Retrieved February 20, 2015. 

External links[edit]