Food Allergy Initiative

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Food Allergy Initiative
Agency overview
Formed 1998
Headquarters New York, NY
Website www.faiusa.org

The Food Allergy Initiative (FAI) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in 1998 with the mission to fund food allergy research that seeks a cure, to improve diagnosis and treatment, and to keep patients safe through advocacy and education. FAI is the largest private source of funding for food allergy research in the United States. As of 2011, the organization has raised more than $72 million[1] towards these goals. FAI consistently receives a four-star rating—the highest available—from Charity Navigator, the largest independent charity evaluator in the United States.

Research[edit]

While working within the guidelines set forth by the National Institutes of Health in the Report of the NIH Expert Panel on Food Allergy Research,[2] FAI works to increase:

  • The number of researchers and research projects that focus on food allergy
  • The number of institutions with food allergy clinical programs
  • The number of fellows and physicians trained to treat food-allergic patients
  • The amount of government funding allocated to food allergy research

FAI sponsors food allergy research across the United States at institutions such as Harvard Medical School, the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and Mount Sinai School of Medicine of New York University.

Advocacy[edit]

FAI played a key role in passing the Food Allergen Labeling & Consumer Protection Act of 2004[3]

Education and patient services[edit]

By working with the media, health care workers, camps, restaurants, food manufacturers, and education and childcare professionals, FAI tries to increase awareness of food allergies and anaphylaxis. Some of the prominent restaurateurs (and restaurants) that have worked with FAI include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About FAI". Food Allergy Initiative. 2009. Retrieved 2009-12-12. 
  2. ^ "Report of the NIH Expert Panel on Food Allergy Research". National Institute of Alergy and Infectious Diseases. 2006. Retrieved 12-10-2008.  [dead link]
  3. ^ "Q&A Regarding Food Allergens, including the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004". Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition - Food and Drug Administration. 2006. Retrieved 2008-12-10. [dead link]