Food Standards Australia New Zealand

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Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) (Māori: Te Mana Kounga Kai - Ahitereiria me Aotearoa), formerly Australia New Zealand Food Authority (ANZFA), is the governmental body responsible for developing food standards for Australia and New Zealand.[1]

FSANZ develops food standards after consulting with other government agencies and stakeholders. The recommendations made by the body are open and accountable, and based upon a rigorous scientific assessment of risk to public health and safety.

All decisions made by FSANZ must be approved by the Australia and New Zealand Food Regulation Ministerial Council, which is composed of the Health Minister from each of the Australian states and territories, and the Health Minister from New Zealand, as well as other participating Ministers nominated by each jurisdiction.[2] This may lead to political interference in the decision, for example the decision made over hemp seed, when the Food Standards scientists recommended that hemp seed be allowed for sale, but the ministers vetoed this because they did not want to appear soft on drugs.

Publications from FSANZ include the Australian Total Diet Survey and Shoppers' Guide to Food Additives and labels.

This authority is sometimes cited variously as Australia and New Zealand Food Standards/Safety Authority (ANZFSA),[3][4][5] possibly incorrect nomenclature arising due to confusion with the non-acronymic older version of the short-name ANZFA, and with the acronym of the New Zealand authority, NZFSA (pronounced enzfissar, similar to anzfessar of ANZFSA) which previously managed such questions in New Zealand.

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Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ "Food Standards Australia New Zealand". Food Standards Australia New Zealand. 
  2. ^ "Board Meeting Outcomes". Food Standards Australia New Zealand. 
  3. ^ "20 Jun 2007". ROXON, the Hon. Nicola Louise, MP. Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) (Commonwealth of Australia: House of Representatives). 
  4. ^ "Australia New Zealand Food Authority Amendment Bill 2001". Commonwealth of Australia. 
  5. ^ Urbana, J.D.; Carakostasb, M.C.; Brusickc, D.J. (January 2013). "Steviol glycoside safety: Is the genotoxicity database sufficient?". Food and Chemical Toxicology 51: 386–390. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2012.10.016. 

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