Football records in Italy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This page details football records in Italy.

Team records[edit]

Most championships won[edit]

Overall[edit]

Consecutives[edit]

Most seasons in Serie A[edit]

Most seasons in Serie B[edit]

Most points in a season[edit]

2 Teams in Final Round (2 points per win) 1928–29
6 Teams in Final Round (2 points per win) 1926–27
8 Teams in Final Round (2 points per win) 1927–28 - 1945–46
16 Teams (2 points per win) 1934–35 to 1942–43 - 1967–68 to 1987–88
18 Teams (2 points per win) 1929–30 to 1933–34 - 1952–53 to 1966–67 - 1988–89 to 1993–94
18 Teams (3 points per win) 1994–95 to 2003–04
20 Teams (2 points per win) 1946–47 - 1948–49 to 1951–52
20 Teams (3 points per win) 2004–05 to present
21 Teams (2 points per win) 1947–48

Most consecutive wins[edit]

Most consecutive home wins[edit]

Longest win streaks from the start of a Serie A season[edit]

Longest win streaks without conceding from the start of a Serie A season[edit]

Most wins in season[edit]

Most home wins in season[edit]

Most matches won[edit]

Most goals scored[edit]

Longest unbeaten streaks[edit]

Longest unbeaten streaks in a single Serie A season[edit]

16 Teams
18 Teams
20 Teams

Individual records[edit]

Most championships won[edit]

Players in bold are still active

8 Championships[edit]

7 Championships[edit]

6 Championships[edit]

5 Championships[edit]

Goalscoring[edit]

Top thirty goal scorers, all-time (only Serie A regular-seasons)

Updated 15 December 2014

Players in bold are still active

Rank Nat Name Years Goals Apps Goal per App
1 Italy Silvio Piola 1929–1954 274 537 0.51
2 Italy Francesco Totti 1992– 237 571 0.42
3 Sweden Gunnar Nordahl 1948–1958 225 291 0.77
4 Italy Giuseppe Meazza 1929–1947 216 367 0.59
BrazilItaly José Altafini 1958–1976 216 459 0.47
6 Italy Roberto Baggio 1985–2004 205 452 0.45
7 Italy Antonio Di Natale 2002– 201 403 0.5
8 Sweden Kurt Hamrin 1956–1971 190 400 0.48
9 Italy Giuseppe Signori 1991–2004 188 344 0.55
Italy Alessandro Del Piero 1993–2012 188 478 0.39
11 Argentina Gabriel Batistuta 1991–2003 184 318 0.58
12 Italy Giampiero Boniperti 1946–1961 178 443 0.4
13 Italy Amedeo Amadei 1936–1956 174 423 0.41
Italy Alberto Gilardino 1999–2014 174 450 0.39
15 Italy Giuseppe Savoldi 1965–1982 168 405 0.41
16 Italy Guglielmo Gabetto 1934–1949 167 322 0.52
17 Italy Roberto Boninsegna 1965–1979 163 366 0.45
18 Italy Luigi Riva 1964–1976 156 289 0.54
Italy Filippo Inzaghi 1995–2012 156 370 0.42
Italy Roberto Mancini 1981–2000 156 541 0.29
21 Brazil Luís Vinício 1955–1968 155 348 0.45
Italy Carlo Reguzzoni 1929–1948 155 401 0.39
23 Hungary István Nyers 1948–1956 153 236 0.65
Argentina Hernán Crespo 1996–2012 153 340 0.45
25 Italy Adriano Bassetto 1946–1958 149 329 0.45
26 ArgentinaItaly Omar Sívori 1957–1969 147 278 0.64
27 Italy Christian Vieri 1991–2009 142 264 0.54
Italy Benito Lorenzi 1947–1959 142 330 0.43
Italy Marco Di Vaio 1994–2012 142 342 0.42
Italy Paolo Pulici 1967–1985 142 401 0.35

Top ten goal scorers, still active (only Serie A regular-seasons)

Updated 15 December 2014

Rank All-time
Rank
Nat Name Debut
Year
Current
Club
Goals Apps Goal per App
1 2 Italy Francesco Totti 1992 Roma 237 571 0.42
2 7 Italy Antonio Di Natale 2002 Udinese 201 403 0.5
3 35 Italy Luca Toni 2000 Verona 134 298 0.45
4 58 Italy Antonio Cassano 1999 Parma 111 371 0.3
5 80 Italy Giampaolo Pazzini 2004 Milan 97 300 0.32
6 94 Italy Sergio Pellissier 2002 Chievo 88 353 0.25
7 103 Italy Amauri 2000 Torino 84 325 0.26
8 n/a Italy Fabio Quagliarella 1999 Torino 79 279 0.28
9 n/a Italy Alessandro Matri 2002 Genoa 74 238 0.31
10 n/a Italy Marco Borriello 2002 Roma 71 257 0.28

Appearances[edit]

Top thirty most appearances, all-time (only Serie A regular-seasons)

Updated 15 December 2014

Players in bold are still active

Rank Nat Name Years Apps Goals
1 Italy Paolo Maldini 1984–2009 647 29
2 Argentina Javier Zanetti 1995–2014 615 12
3 Italy Gianluca Pagliuca 1987–2007 592 -
4 Italy Francesco Totti 1992– 571 237
5 Italy Dino Zoff 1961–1983 570 -
6 Italy Pietro Vierchowod 1980–2000 562 38
7 Italy Roberto Mancini 1981–2000 541 156
8 Italy Silvio Piola 1929–1954 537 274
9 Italy Gianluigi Buffon 1995– 535 -
10 Italy Enrico Albertosi 1958–1980 532 -
11 Italy Gianni Rivera 1958–1979 527 128
12 Italy Giuseppe Bergomi 1980–1999 519 23
13 Italy Ciro Ferrara 1984–2005 500 27
14 Italy Giovanni Galli 1977–1995 496 -
15 Italy Tarcisio Burgnich 1958–1976 494 6
16 Italy Giuseppe Favalli 1989–2010 486 7
17 Italy Andrea Pirlo 1994– 480 56
18 Italy Alessandro Del Piero 1993–2012 478 188
Italy Giancarlo De Sisti 1960–1979 478 50
Italy Angelo Peruzzi 1987–2007 478 -
21 Italy Giacinto Facchetti 1960–1978 475 59
22 Italy Franco Baresi 1977–1997 470 12
23 Italy Pietro Ferraris 1929–1950 469 123
24 Italy Sergio Cervato 1948–1964 466 45
25 Italy Franco Causio 1967–1986 460 66
26 BrazilItaly José Altafini 1958–1976 459 216
27 Italy Alessandro Costacurta 1987–2007 458 3
28 Italy Roberto Baggio 1985–2004 452 205
29 Italy Alberto Gilardino 1999–2014 450 174
30 France Sébastien Frey 1998–2013 446 -

Top ten most appearances, still active (only Serie A regular-seasons)

Updated 15 December 2014

Rank All-time
Rank
Nat Name Debut
Year
Current
Club
Apps Goals
1 4 Italy Francesco Totti 1992 Roma 571 237
2 9 Italy Gianluigi Buffon 1995 Juventus 535 -
3 17 Italy Andrea Pirlo 1994 Juventus 480 56
4 48 Italy Antonio Di Natale 2002 Udinese 403 201
5 66 Italy Morgan De Sanctis 1998 Roma 393 -
6 98 Italy Antonio Cassano 1999 Parma 371 111
Italy Alessandro Lucarelli 1998 Parma 371 20
8 108 Chile David Pizarro 1999 Fiorentina 367 28
9 116 Italy Dario Dainelli 2000 Chievo 362 10
10 120 Italy Giampiero Pinzi 2000 Udinese 359 20

Oldest players[edit]

  1. Italy Marco Ballotta 44 years, 38 days (Last game: 11 May 2008, Lazio)
  2. Italy Francesco Antonioli 42 years, 235 days (Last game: 6 May 2012, Cesena)
  3. Italy Alberto Fontana 41 years, 297 days (Last game: 15 November 2008, Palermo)
  4. Italy Dino Zoff 41 years, 76 days (Last game: 15 May 1983, Juventus)
  5. Italy Alessandro Costacurta 41 years, 25 days (Last game: 19 May 2007, Milan)
  6. Italy Pietro Vierchowod 41 years, 10 days (Last game: 16 April 2000, Piacenza)
  7. Italy Paolo Maldini 40 years, 339 days (Last game: 31 May 2009, Milan)
  8. Argentina Javier Zanetti 40 years, 281 days (Last game: 18 May 2014, Inter)
  9. Italy Silvio Piola 40 years, 159 days (Last game: 7 March 1954, Novara)
  10. Italy Enrico Albertosi 40 years, 100 days (Last game: 10 February 1980, Milan)
  11. Italy Gianluca Pagliuca 40 years, 92 days (Last game: 18 February 2007, Ascoli)
  12. Italy Luca Bucci 40 years, 37 days (Last game: 19 April 2009, Napoli)
  13. Italy Gianluca Berti 39 years, 333 days (Last game: 18 April 2007, Sampdoria)
  14. Italy Antonio Chimenti 39 years, 268 days (Last game: 25 March 2010, Juventus)
  15. Argentina Roberto Néstor Sensini 39 years, 102 days (Last game: 22 January 2006, Udinese)
  16. Italy David Balleri 39 years, 37 days (Last game: 4 May 2008, Livorno)

Youngest Italian players[edit]

  1. Italy Amedeo Amadei; (Roma), 15 years, 280 days (2 May 1937)
  2. Italy Gianni Rivera; (Alessandria), 15 years, 288 days (2 June 1959)
  3. Italy Aristide Rossi; (Cremonese), 15 years, 294 days (29 June 1930[5])
  4. Italy Giuseppe Campione; (Bologna), 15 years, 298 days (25 June 1989[6])
  5. Italy Andrea Pirlo; (Brescia) 16 years, 2 days (21 May 1995)
  6. Italy Stephan El Shaarawy; (Genoa) 16 years, 55 days (21 December 2008)
  7. Italy Lorenzo Tassi; (Brescia) 16 years, 99 days (22 May 2011 [7])
  8. Italy Stefano Okaka; (Roma) 16 years, 131 days (18 December 2005)
  9. Italy Paolo Pupita; (Cesena) 16 years, 134 days (28 January 1990[8])
  10. ItalyNicola Ventola; (Bari) 16 years, 166 days (6 November 1994[9])

Youngest foreign player[edit]

[citation needed]

  1. Bulgaria Valeri Bojinov; (Lecce), 15 years, 341 days (22 January 2002[10])
  2. Greece Lampros Choutos; (Roma), 16 years, 139 days (21 April 1996)
  3. Ghana Nana Welbeck; (Brescia), 16 years, 179 days (22 May 2011)
  4. Brazil Claiton dos Santos; (Bologna), 16 years, 283 days (17 June 2001)
  5. Nigeria Mohammed Aliyu Datti; (Milan), 16 years, 316 days (24 January 1999[11])
  6. Cameroon Frank Ongfiang; (Venezia), 16 years, 345 days (17 June 2001)
  7. Senegal Khouma Babacar; (Fiorentina), 16 years, 347 days (27 February 2010)
  8. Republic of Macedonia Goran Slavkovski; (Internazionale), 17 years, 29 days (7 May 2006)
  9. Ghana Stephen Appiah; (Udinese), 17 years, 49 days (11 February 1998)
  10. Ghana Richmond Boakye; (Genoa), 17 years, 65 days (3 April 2010)

Since FIFA prevented player inter-association movement for under-18 players (U16 within EU), the only possibility to break the record will be a foreign player who has immigrated to Italy using reasons other than football.

Goalkeeping[edit]

The following table shows the goalkeepers that have longest consecutive run without conceding a goal in Serie A. Length column is in minutes.

Players in bold are still active

Rank Nat Name Club Season Length
1 Italy Sebastiano Rossi Milan 1993–94 929
2 Italy Dino Zoff Juventus 1972–73 903
3 Italy Mario Da Pozzo Genoa 1963–64 791
4 Italy Ivan Pelizzoli Roma 2003–04 774
5 Italy Davide Pinato Atalanta 1997–98 757
6 Italy Gianluigi Buffon Juventus 2013–14 744
Italy Luca Marchegiani Lazio 1997–98 744
Italy Morgan De Sanctis Roma 2013–14 744
9 Italy Adriano Reginato Cagliari 1966–67 712
10 Italy Sebastiano Rossi Milan 1993–94 690

Top scorers (capocannonieri) by season[edit]

Main article: Capocannoniere

All time highest bolded.

Year Tally Player
1923–24 22 goals Austria Heinrich Schönfeld (Torino)
1924–25 19 goals Italy Mario Magnozzi (Livorno)
1925–26 35 goals Hungary Ferenc Hirzer (Juventus)
1926–27 22 goals Austria Anton Powolny (Inter)
1927–28 35 goals Argentina Julio Libonatti (Torino)
1928–29 36 goals Italy Gino Rossetti (Torino)
1929–30 31 goals Italy Giuseppe Meazza (Inter)
1930–31 29 goals Italy Rodolfo Volk (Roma)
1931–32 25 goals Uruguay Pedro Petrone (Fiorentina)
Italy Angelo Schiavio (Bologna)
1932–33 29 goals Italy Felice Borel (Juventus)
1933–34 31 goals Italy Felice Borel (Juventus)
1934–35 28 goals Argentina Enrico Guaita (Roma)
1935–36 25 goals Italy Giuseppe Meazza (Inter)
1936–37 21 goals Italy Silvio Piola (Lazio)
1937–38 20 goals Italy Giuseppe Meazza (Inter)
1938–39 19 goals Italy Aldo Boffi (Milan)
Uruguay Ettore Puricelli (Bologna)
1939–40 24 goals Italy Aldo Boffi (Milan)
1940–41 22 goals Uruguay Ettore Puricelli (Bologna)
1941–42 22 goals Italy Aldo Boffi (Milan)
1942–43 21 goals Italy Silvio Piola (Lazio)
1945–46 13 goals Italy Eusebio Castigliano (Torino)
1946–47 29 goals Italy Valentino Mazzola (Torino)
1947–48 27 goals Italy Giampiero Boniperti (Juventus)
1948–49 26 goals Hungary Stefano Nyers (Inter)
1949–50 35 goals Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan)
1950–51 34 goals Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan)
1951–52 30 goals Denmark John Hansen (Juventus)
1952–53 26 goals Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan)
1953–54 23 goals Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan)
1954–55 26 goals Sweden Gunnar Nordahl (Milan)
1955–56 29 goals Italy Gino Pivatelli (Bologna)
1956–57 22 goals Brazil Dino Da Costa (Roma)
1957–58 28 goals Wales John Charles (Juventus)
1958–59 33 goals Argentina Antonio Angelillo (Inter)
1959–60 28 goals Argentina Omar Sívori (Juventus)
1960–61 27 goals Italy Sergio Brighenti (Sampdoria)
1961–62 22 goals BrazilItaly José Altafini (Milan)
Italy Aurelio Milani (Fiorentina)
1962–63 19 goals Denmark Harald Nielsen (Bologna)
Argentina Pedro Manfredini (Roma)
1963–64 21 goals Denmark Harald Nielsen (Bologna)
1964–65 17 goals Italy Alberto Orlando (Fiorentina)
Italy Sandro Mazzola (Inter)
1965–66 25 goals Brazil Luís Vinício (Vicenza)
1966–67 18 goals Italy Luigi Riva (Cagliari)
1967–68 15 goals Italy Pierino Prati (Milan)
1968–69 21 goals Italy Luigi Riva (Cagliari)
Year Tally Player
1969–70 21 goals Italy Luigi Riva (Cagliari)
1970–71 24 goals Italy Roberto Boninsegna (Inter)
1971–72 22 goals Italy Roberto Boninsegna (Inter)
1972–73 17 goals Italy Paolo Pulici (Torino)
Italy Gianni Rivera (Milan)
Italy Giuseppe Savoldi (Bologna)
1973–74 24 goals Italy Giorgio Chinaglia (Lazio)
1974–75 18 goals Italy Paolo Pulici (Torino)
1975–76 21 goals Italy Paolo Pulici (Torino)
1976–77 21 goals Italy Francesco Graziani (Torino)
1977–78 24 goals Italy Paolo Rossi (Vicenza)
1978–79 19 goals Italy Bruno Giordano (Lazio)
1979–80 16 goals Italy Roberto Bettega (Juventus)
1980–81 18 goals Italy Roberto Pruzzo (Roma)
1981–82 15 goals Italy Roberto Pruzzo (Roma)
1982–83 16 goals France Michel Platini (Juventus)
1983–84 20 goals France Michel Platini (Juventus)
1984–85 18 goals France Michel Platini (Juventus)
1985–86 19 goals Italy Roberto Pruzzo (Roma)
1986–87 17 goals Italy Pietro Paolo Virdis (Milan)
1987–88 15 goals Argentina Diego Maradona (Napoli)
1988–89 22 goals Italy Aldo Serena (Inter)
1989–90 19 goals Netherlands Marco van Basten (Milan)
1990–91 19 goals Italy Gianluca Vialli (Sampdoria)
1991–92 25 goals Netherlands Marco van Basten (Milan)
1992–93 26 goals Italy Giuseppe Signori (Lazio)
1993–94 23 goals Italy Giuseppe Signori (Lazio)
1994–95 26 goals Argentina Gabriel Batistuta (Fiorentina)
1995–96 24 goals Italy Giuseppe Signori (Lazio)
Italy Igor Protti (Bari)
1996–97 24 goals Italy Filippo Inzaghi (Atalanta)
1997–98 27 goals Germany Oliver Bierhoff (Udinese)
1998–99 22 goals Brazil Márcio Amoroso (Udinese)
1999–00 24 goals Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko (Milan)
2000–01 26 goals Argentina Hernán Crespo (Lazio)
2001–02 24 goals France David Trezeguet (Juventus)
Italy Dario Hübner (Piacenza)
2002–03 24 goals Italy Christian Vieri (Inter)
2003–04 24 goals Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko (Milan)
2004–05 24 goals Italy Cristiano Lucarelli (Livorno)
2005–06 31 goals Italy Luca Toni (Fiorentina)
2006–07 26 goals Italy Francesco Totti (Roma)
2007–08 21 goals Italy Alessandro Del Piero (Juventus)
2008–09 25 goals Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović (Inter)
2009–10 29 goals Italy Antonio Di Natale (Udinese)
2010–11 28 goals Italy Antonio Di Natale (Udinese)
2011–12 28 goals Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović (Milan)
2012–13 29 goals Uruguay Edinson Cavani (Napoli)
2013–14 22 goals Italy Ciro Immobile (Torino)

Most successful clubs overall (1898–present)[edit]

The following table includes only Italian, European and worldwide competitions organised respectively by FIGC, UEFA and FIFA since 1898.[12] The figures in bold represent the most times this competition has been won by an Italian team. Teams which have one at least one official title are included, ranked by number of overall titles at national and/or international level and listed in chronological order in case of a tie.

Key[edit]

Domestic competitions organized by FIGC
IFC Serie A, former Italian Football Championship
CI Coppa Italia
SI Supercoppa Italiana
European competitions organized by UEFA
UCL UEFA Champions League, former European Champion Clubs' Cup
UCWC UEFA Cup Winners' Cup (Defunct)
UEL UEFA Europa League, former UEFA Cup
ICFC Inter-Cities Fairs Cup (Defunct) (Not organized by UEFA, but recognized as the unofficial predecessor to the UEL and acknowledged by FIFA as a major trophy)
USC UEFA Super Cup
UIC UEFA Intertoto Cup (Defunct)
IC UEFA/CONMEBOL Intercontinental Cup (Defunct) (Predecessor to FCWC)
Intercontinental competition organized by FIFA
FCWC FIFA Club World Cup

By club[edit]

Team FIGC UEFA FIFA Total
IFC CI SI Total UCL[13] UCWC[14] UEL[15] ICFC# USC[16] UIC[17] Total IC*[18][19] FCWC[18][20]
Juventus 30 9 6 45 2 1 3 - 2 1 9 2 - 56
Milan 18 5 6 29 7 2 - - 5 - 14 3 1 47
Internazionale 18[3] 7 5 30 3 - 3 - - - 6 2 1 39
Roma 3 9 2 14 - - - 1 - - 1 - - 15
Lazio 2 6 3 11 - 1 - - 1 - 2 - - 13
Torino 7[21] 5 - 12 - - - - - - - - - 12
Genoa 9[22] 1 - 10 - - - - - - - - - 10
Bologna 7 2 - 9 - - - - - 1 1 - - 10
Fiorentina 2 6 1 9 - 1[23] - - - - 1 - - 10
Napoli 2 5 1 8 - - 1 - - - 1 - - 9
Parma - 3 1 4 - 1 2 - 1 - 4 - - 8
Pro Vercelli 7[24] - - 7 - - - - - - - - - 7
Sampdoria 1 4 1 6 - 1 - - - - 1 - - 7
Casale 1 - - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Novese 1 - - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Cagliari 1 - - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Verona 1 - - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Vado - 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Venezia - 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Atalanta - 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Vicenza - 1 - 1 - - - - - - - - - 1
Perugia - - - - - - - - - 1 1 - - 1
Udinese - - - - - - - - - 1 1 - - 1

Additionally, the Alta Italia Championship—also knowns as Campionato di guerra (War Championship)—, won by the Vigili del Fuoco della Spezia in 1944 (the only edition ever held), was recognised by FIGC in 2000 as the equivalent to the Serie A championship of that year.[25][26]
# Although not organized by UEFA, the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup is included here under UEFA as it is the official predecessor to the UEL.
* Although organized by UEFA (and CONMEBOL), the Intercontinental Cup is included here under FIFA for being the predecessor to the FCWC.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ although Juventus won 32 scudetti, 2 of them have been revoked for the calciopoli scandal, 30 are those been recognized by the FIGC
  2. ^ The 1943–44 and 1944–45 Serie A seasons weren't held due to World War II.
  3. ^ a b Internazionale were awarded the 2005–06 Serie A championship as they were the highest placed side in the season's final league table after points were stripped from Juventus and Milan — both sides being involved in the Italian football scandal that year.
  4. ^ a b http://www.rsssf.com/tablesi/italalltime.html
  5. ^ http://www.uscremonese.it/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2098&Itemid=206
  6. ^ http://ricerca.repubblica.it/repubblica/archivio/repubblica/2002/01/29/un-angelov-custode-il-segreto-di-bojinov.html
  7. ^ http://www.soccerway.com/players/lorenzo-tassi/180573/
  8. ^ http://www.tuttocesenaweb.it/rassegna-stampa/corriere-romagna-cesena-maglia-nera-di-serie-a-e-b-5208
  9. ^ http://www.fantagazzetta.com/Blog/nicola-ventola-erick-thohir-e-quegli-idoli-un-po-cosi-177791
  10. ^ http://ricerca.repubblica.it/repubblica/archivio/repubblica/2002/01/29/un-angelov-custode-il-segreto-di-bojinov.html
  11. ^ http://www.magliarossonera.it/protagonisti/Gioc-Aliyu.html
  12. ^ For all other competitions not organized respectively by the above-mentioned bodies, please refer to the "Honours" section in each club's own article.
  13. ^ Prior to 1992, the tournament was officially called the European Champion Clubs' Cup but was usually referred to as simply the European Cup.
  14. ^ The tournament was founded in 1960–61 independently to the UEFA administration. The governing body of the European football organised the Cup Winners' Cup for the first time in 1961–62 season. The competition was discontinued in 1999 when it was absorbed by the UEFA Cup, cf. "50 years ago: UEFA Cup Winners' Cup makes its debut" (PDF). uefadirect (Union des Associations Européennes de Football) 100: 15. August 2010. 
  15. ^ Created by the Union of European Football Associations as UEFA Cup in the 1971–72 season. "UEFA Cup gets new name in revamp". BBC Sport. 26 September 2008. Retrieved 26 September 2008. 
    "UEFA Cup: All-time finals". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 13 July 2009. 
  16. ^ Competition established by UEFA in 1973. Despite the Scottish Rangers' 100º anniversary match is regarded the predecessor of the UEFA Super Cup, it is not counted as an official trophy for official record purposes due the 1972 Rangers riots, cf. "UEFA Super Cup: History". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  17. ^ The tournament was founded in 1961–62 independently to the UEFA administration. The governing body of the European football organised the Intertoto Cup for the first time in 1995. The competition was discontinued in 2008 when it was absorbed by the UEFA Cup, cf. "UEFA Intertoto Cup winners 1995-2008". The European Lotteries. Retrieved 14 September 2011. 
  18. ^ a b The Intercontinental Cup, organized by UEFA and CONMEBOL from 1960 to 2004 is considered by FIFA a worldwide competition and the unique predecessor of the FIFA Club World Cup, cf. "FIFA Club World Championship to replace Toyota Cup from 2005". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 17 May 2004. Retrieved 2010-12-24. 
  19. ^ "FIFA Club World Cup UAE 2010 Statistical Kit" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de Football Association. pp. 4; 20–22. Retrieved 25 December 2010. 
    "Goodbye Toyota Cup, hello FIFA Club World Championship". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 10 December 2004. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
    "Ten tips on the planet's top club tournament". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 July 2005. Retrieved 28 October 2009. 
    "We are the champions". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 1 December 2005. Retrieved 28 October 2009. 
  20. ^ Competition established by FIFA in 2000.
  21. ^ Including the Divisione Nazionale 1945–46 championship—also knowns as Campionato Alta Italia 1945–46—, competition in which participated teams from Serie A and Serie B and recognised by FIGC as the equivalent to the national championship, cf. Vittorio Pozzo (19 September 1946). "Calcio d'inizio del massimo campionato" (in Italian). La Stampa. p. 3. Retrieved 16 September 2011. 
    On 5 May 1949, after the Superga air disaster, the Italian Football Federation proclaimed Torino 1948–49 Serie A winner due its first place in the general classification before the event. The last four matchdays of that championship were contested by reserve teams, cf. "Il Torino 1948/1949". archiviotoro.it (in Italian). Retrieved 19 September 2011. 
  22. ^ The 1914–15 football championship was suspended on 23 May 1915, after having played the sixth round of the final stage, due to the participation of the Italian Army in the World War I. On 23 September 1919, the Italian Football Association proclaimed Genoa—first in the general classification—as the 1914–15 Prima Categoria winner, cf. "Storia del Genoa: La grande guerra". enciclopediadelcalcio.it (in Italian). Retrieved 19 September 2011. 
    Aldo Padovano (by). "1919-1925: Il Genoa d'oro (seconda parte)". genoacfc.it (in Italian). Retrieved 19 September 2011. 
  23. ^ The first competition was organised by the Mitropa Cup committee and held in the 1960–61 season—but not recognised by the governing body of European football until two years later, cf. "50 years ago: UEFA Cup Winners' Cup makes its debut" (PDF). uefadirect (Union des Associations Européennes de Football) 100: 15. August 2010. 
  24. ^ Including the 1921–22 Prima Divisione, tournament organised by the Confederazione Calcistica Italiana (CCI) in 1921–22 season and recognised by FIGC as the equivalent to the Italian Championship of that season, cf. Vittorio Pozzo (5 June 1942). "I cinquant'anni della Pro Vercelli" (in Italian). La Stampa. p. 4. Retrieved 16 September 2011. 
  25. ^ Gian Paolo Ormezzano (17 April 2000). "Voglia di scudetto" (in Italian). La Stampa. p. 40. Retrieved 3 September 2011. 
  26. ^ "Communicato Stampa FIGC" (pdf) (in Italian). Federazione Italiana Giuoco Calcio. 25 June 2009. Retrieved 23 December 2011. 

External links[edit]