For Love of Ivy

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For Love of Ivy
LoveofIvyposter.jpg
Theatrical poster
Directed by Daniel Mann
Produced by Edgar J. Scherick
Jay Weston
Screenplay by Robert Alan Arthur
Story by Sidney Poitier
Starring Sidney Poitier
Abbey Lincoln
Beau Bridges
Nan Martin
Lauri Peters
Carroll O'Connor
Music by Quincy Jones
Production
company
Distributed by Cinerama Releasing Corporation
Release dates
  • July 17, 1968 (1968-07-17)
Running time 101 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $2,590,000[1]
Box office $7,270,000[1]

For Love of Ivy is a 1968 romantic comedy film directed by Daniel Mann. The film stars Sidney Poitier, Abbey Lincoln, Beau Bridges, Nan Martin, Lauri Peters and Carroll O'Connor. The story was written by Sidney Poitier with screenwriter Robert Alan Arthur. The musical score was composed by Quincy Jones. The theme song "For Love of Ivy", written by Quincy Jones and Bob Russell, was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song. The film received Golden Globe supporting acting nominations for Beau Bridges and Abbey Lincoln.

Plot[edit]

Seeking to improve herself, Ivy Moore, an African-American maid, announces her decision to leave her job working for the Austin family and go to secretarial school. The Austins are desperate to keep her and the teenagers, Gena and Tim, hatch a scheme to do so. Tim Austin sets up Ivy with Jack Parks, a trucking company executive, to wine and dine Ivy Moore. He hopes that the introduction of excitement in her life will dissuade her from leaving the family. Tim Austin persuades a reluctant Jack Parks to date her by threatening to reveal his illegal gambling casino. Their initial meetings are awkward for the cosmopolitan Parks and the less sophisticated Moore. Eventually, however, romance blossoms, but when Moore learns that Parks was coerced into initially dating her, she breaks up with him. Parks overcomes his attachment to swinging bachelorhood and asks Moore to leave with him for the city. She accepts.

Cast[edit]

Response[edit]

The film opened to positive reviews and was liked by both black and white audiences. Many applauded the performances of both Sidney Poitier and Abbey Lincoln, and they were the year's cinematic dream couple. Even Ebony Magazine gave the two a cover story. Also applauded were Beau Bridges and Carroll O'Connor: later, both actors appeared in films and TV shows, some dealing with racial issues. Bridges did the urban comedy-drama The Landlord and other films, and O'Connor landed other roles as he made his way to TV glory as Archie Bunker on All in the Family.

Box Office[edit]

The movie earned box office rentals of $5,570,000 in North America[2] with $1.7 million coming from the rest of the world. After distribution fees, prints and advertising and the negative cost were taken away, the film recorded a profit of $390,000.[1]

Themes[edit]

While it isn't a race movie, or primarily about race, Jack Parks (Sidney Poitier) enjoys playing on the Austin children's racial stereotypes.

The film was released on Region 1 DVD by MGM Home Video January 20, 2004.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "ABC's 5 Years of Film Production Profits & Losses", Variety, 31 May 1973 p 3
  2. ^ "Big Rental Films of 1968", Variety, 8 January 1969 p 15. Please note this figure is a rental accruing to distributors.

External links[edit]