Ford Falcon (Argentina)

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This article is about the Argentinean car model. For models produced for other countries, see Ford Falcon.
Ford Falcon
Falcon 1970.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company of Argentina
Production 1962-1991
Assembly General Pacheco
Body and chassis
Class Full-size
Body style 4-door sedan
5-door station wagon
2-door coupé utility
Powertrain
Engine 2,299 cc OHC Pinto I4 (from 1983)
2,786 cc "170" I6
3,081 cc "187" I6
3,620 cc "221" I6
2,393 L VM HR492 diesel I4
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,781 mm (109 in)
Length 4,597–4,732 mm (181.0–186.3 in)
Width 1,781–1,793 mm (70.1–70.6 in)
Height 1,402 mm (55.2 in)
Curb weight 1,230–1,406 kg (2,712–3,100 lb)

The Argentine Ford Falcon is a car that was built by Ford Argentina from 1962 to 1991. Mechanically, it was based on Ford USA's 1960 Falcon. The Falcon retained the same elegant body style throughout its production, with several substantial face lifts taking place during its lifespan, giving it a more European flavour and bringing it into line with other more contemporary Fords. However, several decades later it was apparent that it was a 1960s design wearing a 1980s grille.

The robust Ford Falcons became popular as black and yellow taxi cabs and black and blue police vehicles. They also had a less tasteful connotation, with the dark green painted Falcons used by paramilitary government forces like the Argentine Anticommunist Alliance death squads of the 1970s and the secret police of the military junta.[1][2]

Falcons are still raced in the Turismo Carretera stock car racing series.

History[edit]

1961-1965 period Ford Falcon

The story of the Falcon in Argentina began in 1961 when Ford Motor Argentina imported two Falcons from the US to test.

1962[edit]

In 1962, local production began with complete knock down kits imported from the US assembled at the Ford factory in La Boca. Only a sedan was offered, with Standard and Deluxe trim levels, and a 170 cubic inch Ford inline-six engine.[3] The official unveiling of the Falcon to the country took place in the theater "Gran Rex" in February 1962.[4]

1963[edit]

The first restyle of the Falcon came in 1963 and was produced until 1965. The Falcon now had a horizontal aluminum grill. New models included the Taxi model in 1964, and the more powerful Futura in 1965, with a vinyl roof and bucket seats. The very first Futura left the production line on 4 December 1964.[5] A larger and more powerful 187 c.i. (3,081 cc) engine was added with the Futura, offering 116 hp (87 kW). More parts were manufactured locally.[6] In 1965, the Falcon became the best seller in the Argentinian market for the first time, reaching an 11.6% share of the market.[5]

1966[edit]

The second restyling of 1966 brought a more ornate grill, hood and side panel ornamentation. Most parts were now locally produced. In late 1967, the new Falcon Rural station wagon model began production, with its own Futura and Deluxe variants. Unlike the North American Falcon wagon, the Argentinian Falcon Rural sat on the same wheelbase as the sedans.[7] High compression engines producing more power were available from 1968, and in 1969 Ford introduced a higher performance 3.6 litre 132 hp engine that became available as an option (model 221XP), it employed a freer-breathing cylinder head and less restrictive exhaust system to boost power. A floor mounted 4-speed transmission became available for the first time.[8]

1970[edit]

1971 Ford Falcon

The third restyling of 1970 began drifting away from the original design as quad headlights were introduced on Deluxe and Futura models, new front and rear bumpers with vertical nudge bars and disc brakes with 14 inch wheels and low aspect red stripe radial tyres are now available as options. The 188 and 221 c.i. engines were now standard. The Futura Rural station wagon was discontinued, instead replaced by the similarly equipped Falcon Rural Deluxe.[9]

1973[edit]

By 1973, its fourth restyling, it drifts even more away from the original design as it gets a new redesigned dashboard with round instruments and tachometer on deluxe models, a new grill with several thick horizontal bars and quad headlights become squarer in design. A sporting Falcon Sprint was introduced with new refreshing color schemes, painted stripes, 14 inch sports wheels and E70x14 red-striped Firestone Wide-Tread tires were standard and a higher performance 166 bhp (124.5 kW) specially tuned 3.6 litre (221 c.i.) engine, on the interior it included additional gauges and leather-covered sports steering wheel and leatherette bucket seats of exclusive design. The Deluxe trim of the Rural station wagon was dropped. A pickup, called the Ranchero, was introduced with Standard and Deluxe external trim and a heavy-duty brake option.[10]

1978[edit]

1978 Ford Falcon Sprint

The fifth restyling of 1978 brought further cosmetic changes, with another new grill this time in plastic, Ford's new oval logo emblems, new updated door handles, improved cabin ventilation with exhaust vents on the c pillar, single large rectangular headlights and 175/70 R14 radial tyres on sporting or deluxe models amongst several other changes.[11]

1982[edit]

1982 Ford Falcon Ghía

On its sixth and last restyling it tries to bring its design in line as it is sold along its more modern "siblings", the Ford Taunus, Sierra and later the Escort. Changes include new bumpers with rubber strips and rubber end caps, new large rectangular taillights with amber turn signals, bronze tinted glass replaces green and a larger trunk by reconfiguring the trunk floor and repositioning the spare tyre and other minor cosmetic changes. The Rural continued to use the original taillights. The Taxi and Sprint versions were dropped, and the Futura was changed into the Ghia. A 2.3 litre four-cylinder petrol engine was now available, and from 1988 a rare 2.4 litre diesel. The diesel, a 70 hp (52 kW) Italian-made VM HR492, was installed by Borward Puntana but as they were unable to provide engines at the pace needed by Ford the project soon came to a halt. Most of the diesels built were Ranchero pickups.[12]The pickup truck, capable of a 715 kg (1,576 lb) max load, continued to be available with the 3.3 and 3.6 litre sixes as well as the new four.[13]

The 2.3 offered 90 PS (66 kW), while the smaller six has only 84 PS (62 kW), albeit with a higher torque and at a more leisurely engine speed.[14] The unpopular (due to fuel economy worse than that of the 3-litre six) four-cylinder was available only with a four-speed manual, rather than the three-speed manual of the sixes.[15] The four-cylinder was shared with the Argentinian-built Taunus and Sierras. The larger 3.6, the only engine available to the Ghia, has 109 PS (80 kW) except in the high performance Ghia SP, where 140 PS (103 kW) were on tap thanks to twin carburettors.[14] Introduced in 1982, there was also a low-compression version of the 3.6 with 103 PS (76 kW).[16] In 1989, the new Max Econo version of the 188 c.i./3-litre engine became available, with better fuel economy at the cost of performance. Chrome was removed in 1990, and the Falcon was finally discontinued after 1991.[12]

Production[edit]

1962-1991 Ford Falcon Production (Sedan and Pickup*)[17][18]
Year Production Year Production Year Production
1962
4,684
1972
25,312
1982
17,296
1963
4,619
1973
35,595
1983
22,060
1964
11,966
1974
25,870
1984
15,075
1965
15,442
1975
11,525
1985
9,405
1966
16,478
1976
8,669
1986
7,691
1967
15,109
1977
16,579
1987
7,839
1968
17,560
1978
20,355
1988
5,272
1969
14,607
1979
28,522
1989
3,232
1970
21,193
1980
34,154
1990
2,177
1971
26,135
1981
19,913
1991
2,462
Total:
466,796

* Note: Not included in above chart are 33,493 Station Wagons (Falcon Rural) for a total of 494,209 Ford Falcons sold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schweimler, David (2006-03-24). "Argentina: Coming to terms with the past". BBC News. 
  2. ^ Ortiz, Fiona (2007-05-04). "Argentine death squad cars try for new image". Reuters. 
  3. ^ Falcon 1962
  4. ^ "Historia del Ford Falcon" [History of the Ford Falcon] (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 
  5. ^ a b 1961—1991: Falcon, p. 9
  6. ^ "Ford Falcon 1963" (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 
  7. ^ 1961—1991: Falcon, p. 13
  8. ^ "Ford Falcon 1966" (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. 
  9. ^ "Ford Falcon 1970" (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 
  10. ^ "Ford Falcon 1973" (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. 
  11. ^ "Ford Falcon 1978" (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. 
  12. ^ a b "Ford Falcon 1982" (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. 
  13. ^ Heitz, Rudolf, ed. (1985-08-01). Auto Katalog 1986 (in German) 29. Stuttgart: Vereinigte Motor-Verlage GmbH & Co. KG. p. 24. 81530/85001. 
  14. ^ a b Auto Katalog 1986, p. 116
  15. ^ Mastrostefano, Raffaele, ed. (1990). Quattroruote: Tutte le Auto del Mondo 1990 (in Italian). Milano: Editoriale Domus S.p.A. pp. 305–306. 
  16. ^ Heitz, Rudolf, ed. (1982). Auto Katalog 1983 (in German) 26. Stuttgart: Vereinigte Motor-Verlage GmbH & Co. KG. p. 54. 
  17. ^ "Ventas del Falcon por año" [Falcon annual sales] (in Spanish). Todo Falcon. Retrieved 2008-11-23. 
  18. ^ "2.3 - Producción nacional de automotores - Por modelo" [National automotive production, per model] (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: ADEFA: Asociación de Fábricas de Automotores. 2005. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 

External links[edit]