Fordham University Press

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Fordham University Press
Fordham University Press
Parent company Fordham University
Founded 1907
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Bronx, New York
Nonfiction topics anthropology, philosophy, theology, history, classics, communications, economics, sociology, business, political science, and law, as well as literature and the fine arts. Additionally, the press publishes books focusing on the metropolitan New York region and books of interest to the general public.
Imprints Empire State Editions
Official website www.fordhampress.com

The Fordham University Press is a publishing house, a division of Fordham University, that publishes primarily in the humanities and the social sciences. Fordham University Press was established in 1907 and is headquartered in the Canisius Hall building in the Rose Hill Campus of Fordham University in the Bronx, New York.

It has been a member of the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) since 1938 and was a founding charter member of the Association of Jesuit University Presses (AJUP).[1] The press was established "not only to represent and uphold the values and traditions of the University itself, but also to further those values and traditions through the dissemination of scholarly research and ideas".[1]

Bestselling List[edit]

Greek: An Intensive Course by Hardy Hansen and Gerald Quinn [2]
Autobiography of St. Ignatius Loyola by John C. Olin [3]
Deconstruction in a Nutshell by John D. Caputo [4]
Giving an Account of Oneself by Judith Butler [5]
Love of Learning and Desire for God by Jean Leclercq, O.S.B. [6]
Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free by Alexander Jefferson [7]
Under the Sidewalks of New York by Brian Cudahy [8]
Byzantine Theology by John Meyendorff [9]
Irish Brigade and Its Campaign by David P. Conyngham [10]
An Aquinas Reader Edited by Mary T. Clark [11]
The Street Book by Henry Moscow [12]
The Search for Major Plagge by Michael Good [13]

Series[edit]

American Philosophy[edit]

Edited by Douglas R Anderson, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, and Jude Jones, Fordham University

Forms of Living[edit]

Edited by Stefanos Geroulanos, New York University, and Todd E. Meyers, Wayne State University

The Forms of Living series seeks to provide an outlet for theoretically and methodologically rigorous writing theorized and articulated through various disciplines, frames, and attempts. Thus the series promotes translations of important work in languages other than English, organizes edited volumes serving as introductions to scholars not well known to Anglo-American audiences, and delivers original and provocative writing from renown scholars as well as first-time authors. By connecting works that may not otherwise be read alongside one another, Forms of Living eavesdrops on conversations already occurring between scholars, and begins new conversations on what is at stake between knowledge and life.

The Future of the Religious Past[edit]

Edited by Hent de Vries, The Johns Hopkins University and University of Amsterdam

International Humanitarian Affairs[edit]

Edited by Kevin M. Cahill, M.D., Fordham University

Just Ideas[edit]

Edited by Roger Berkowitz, Bard College, Drucilla Cornell, Rutgers University, and Kenneth Panfilio, Illinois State University

The Just Ideas series offers both scholarly monographs and more widely accessible books that engage the reader with contemporary philosophical, social, and judicial topics. This series explores the multi-faceted relation between law and justice, illuminates the importance of continental philosophy in that exploration, and enriches our understanding of literary texts dealing with justice. To practically apply theory to the struggle for global justice, texts from this series engage the work of transformative constitutionalism in third-world and developed constitutional democracies, evaluate the role of international law and human rights, and critique social-scientific legal scholarship that restricts law to solely social facts.

The McGannon Center Everett C. Parker Book Series[edit]

Edited by Philip Napoli, Fordham University

Medieval Philosophy: Texts and Studies[edit]

Edited by Gyula Klima, Fordham University

The primary interest of this series is in methodological diversity and innovation. Its fields of inquiry include material, textual, and manuscript culture. The series offers original studies, translations, and multiauthor volumes, as well as source materials on late antique and medieval culture, with an openness to interdisciplinary methods and cross-cultural studies. Topical concentrations include religious studies, theology, race and gender studies, literary studies, and less-studied fields.

Moral Philosophy and Moral Theology[edit]

Edited by Romanus Cessario, O.P, St. John's Seminary, and Joseph Koterski, S.J., Fordham University

The North's Civil War[edit]

Edited by Paul A. Cimbala, Fordham University

Orthodox Christianity and Contemporary Thought[edit]

Edited by George Demacopoulos and Aristotle Papanikolaou, (both Fordham University)

This series consists of books that seek to bring Orthodox Christianity into an engagement with contemporary forms of thought. Its goal is to promote (1) historical studies in Orthodox Christianity that are interdisciplinary, employ a variety of methods, and speak to contemporary issues; and (2) constructive theological arguments in conversation with patristic sources and that focus on contemporary questions ranging from the traditional theological and philosophical themes of God and human identity to cultural, political, economic, and ethical concerns. The books in the series will explore both the relevancy of Orthodox Christianity to contemporary challenges and the impact of contemporary modes of thought on Orthodox self-understandings.

People and the Environment[edit]

Edited by Paolo Galizzi, Fordham University Law School
Associate Editor, Alena Herklotz, Fordham University Law School

Perspectives in Continental Philosophy[edit]

Edited by John D. Caputo, Villanova University and Syracuse University

Poets Out Loud[edit]

Edited by Elisabeth Frost, Fordham University [14]

Reconstructing America[edit]

Edited by Paul A. Cimbala, Fordham University

World War II: The Global, Human, and Ethical Dimension[edit]

Edited by G. Kurt Piehler, University of Tennessee

This series will feature new and exciting scholarship on the history of the Second World War. It is equally interested in monographs that explore the political, military, diplomatic, and economic dimensions of this war as well those that examine its social, cultural, intellectual, and gender history. A central focus of this series will to be on monographs analyzing the human dimension of this epic conflict. It seeks works that analyze the multitude of experiences faced not only by combatants, but also by civilians who lived in all the nations engaged in this war. A global war, this epic struggle left no society untouched. Thus, the series seeks works that explore the impact of this conflict not only on the United States, Europe, and Japan, but also on Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Initiatives[edit]

The American Literatures Initiative[edit]

The American Literatures Initiative is a new collaborative book publishing program, supported by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to create new opportunities for publication in under-served and emerging areas of the humanities. This new five-press publishing collaboration—New York University Press, Fordham University Press, Rutgers University Press, Temple University Press, and the University of Virginia Press—will confront the publishing crisis in literature and literary studies, where the annual number of univer¬sity press books has declined steeply in recent years, placing younger scholars at a disadvantage when writing their first books. The American Literatures Initiative, which will launch in January, 2008, will be an innovative, entrepreneurial, cooperative effort to expand the number of books published in literary studies and increase audience reach by using common resources available to the five Presses through a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Each press will continue to acquire and develop titles according to its own needs and editorial criteria looking for high-quality first books by promising scholars, seeking out the best scholarly work about English-language literatures of Cen¬tral and North America and the Caribbean. [15]

The Modern Language Initiative[edit]

The Modern Language Initiative publishes scholarship by first authors writing in English about linguistic cultural productions in languages other than English. This includes all types of literature, as well as other verbal productions such as rhetoric and film, in addition to performance, popular culture, and any other form that employs language. The initiative has created a collaborative model that will offer scholars in a wide range of languages and literatures a shared and welcoming space for publishing excellent scholarship and at the same time addresses a transformative moment in the structure, purpose, and content of foreign language teaching and research. We have crafted this initiative to respond to a negative—some would say a disastrous—trend: the dramatic reduction in publishing opportunities in foreign languages and literatures at a time when enrollments in foreign languages and interest in foreign cultures are greater than they have been in many years. Modern language departments, in which scholarship on linguistic cultural productions in languages other than English is primarily based, develop, preserve, and transmit the cultural knowledge and linguistic competence necessary for understanding other cultures. Moreover, since culture is inherently international, these departments have been the point at which many of the most important intellectual developments in recent decades, whatever their home discipline, have first entered the American academy. They house the scholars who can read these developments in their original languages and who can interpret the culture of their origin.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A.J.U.P.". Saint Joseph's University Press. Retrieved 2010-08-17. 

External links[edit]