Forges du Saint-Maurice

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Forges du Saint-Maurice ("St. Maurice Ironworks"), just outside of Trois-Rivières, Quebec, is a National Historic Site of Canada, and birthplace of the country's iron industry.

Forges du Saint-Maurice was created on 25 March 1730, the second company (after the failure of the first) granted a monopoly to employ the iron ore deposits at Trois-Rivières.[1]

The forge started working in 1738[1] and remained in virtually continuous operation until closing. It employed about 100 craftsmen (most originally from Burgundy)[1] and 300-400 labourers[1] in production of forged and molded iron products, including pots, pans, and stoves. Director F. E. Cugnet went bankrupt in 1742,[1] leading to a state takeover[1] and handover to Britain after the Treaty of Paris.[1]

In 1747, the company experimented unsuccessfully with cannon making and steel production.[1]

From 1738 into the mid-1830s, the Forges were "the most technologically advanced ironworks in America",[1] but had become the oldest operating blast furnace in North America, and far out of date,[1] by the time it shut down for good in March 1883.

In 1973, Forges du Saint-Maurice became a national historic park. Archaeological research there continues.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Miquelon, Dale. "Les Forges Saint-Maurice", in The Canadian Encyclopedia (Edmonton: Hurtig Publishers, 1988), Volume 2, p.817.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 46°23′54″N 72°39′28″W / 46.39833°N 72.65778°W / 46.39833; -72.65778