Fornax Cluster

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Fornax Cluster
Wide-field view of the Fornax Galaxy Cluster.jpg
Wide-field view of the Fornax galaxy cluster.
Observation data (Epoch J2000)
Constellation(s) Fornax
Right ascension 3h 38m[1]
Declination -35° 27′[1]
Other designations
NGC 1399 Group, Abell S0373,[1] LGG 96
See also: Galaxy groups, Galaxy clusters, List of galaxy clusters

The Fornax Cluster is a cluster of galaxies lying at a distance of 62 million light-years (19 megaparsecs).[2] It is the second richest galaxy cluster within 100 million light-years, after the considerably larger Virgo Cluster. It lies primarily in the constellation Fornax, and may be associated with the nearby Eridanus Group. The Fornax Cluster is a valuable source of information about the evolution of such clusters, showing the effects of a merger of a subgroup with the main group,[3] which in turn lends clues about the associated galactic superstructure.[4] At the centre of the cluster lies NGC 1399.[2] Other cluster members include: NGC 1316 -its brightest galaxy-, NGC 1365, NGC 1427A, NGC 1404.[2]

Structure[edit]

Fornax can be divided into two subclusters: the main one, centered on NGC 1399, and a subgroup 3 degrees to the southwest centered on the lenticular galaxy NGC 1316 that is in the process of infalling with the largest subcluster to finally merge with it, and whose galaxies are experiencing strong star formation activity.[5]

Intracluster medium[edit]

As with many other galaxy clusters, Fornax intracluster medium is filled with a hot, rarefied gas that emits X-rays[6] and contains a number of intergalactic stars, some of which have produced novae.[7]

List of cluster members[edit]

NGC 1399 galaxy by the HST; 2.76′ view.
Cluster Members
Designation Coordinates (Epoch 2000) Apparent magnitude (blue) Type Angular diameter
(arcminutes)
Diameter
(x1000 Light-years)
Recessional velocity
(km/s)
Right Ascension Declination
ESO 357-07 03 10.4 -33 09 14.7 SBm 2.2′ 40 981
ESO 357-12 03 16.9 -35 32 14.8 SBcd 2.2′ 40 1445
IC 1913 03 19.6 -32 28 14.5 SBb 2.1′ 40 1318
NGC 1310 03 21.1 -37 06 13 SBc 1.9′ 35 1640
PGC 12625 03 22.1 -37 35  ? Irr 2.9′ 55 1507
NGC 1316 03 22.7 -37 12 9.8 S0 11.5′ 215 1664
NGC 1317 03 22.7 -37 06 11.9 SBa 3.0′ 55 1815
NGC 1326 03 23.9 -36 28 11.5 S0 4.3′ 80 1247
NGC 1326A 03 25.1 -36 22 14.7 SBm 1.7′ 30 1719
NGC 1326B 03 25.3 -36 23 13.7 SBm 3.5′ 65 888
IC 1919 03 26.0 -32 54 13.9 E 1.6′ 30 1158
NGC 1336 03 26.5 -35 43 13.4 E 1.9′ 35 1360
NGC 1341 03 28.0 -37 09 13.3 SBab 1.6′ 30 1760
NGC 1339 03 28.1 -32 17 12.8 E 1.9′ 35 1240
NGC 1344 03 28.3 -31 04 11.2 E 5.6′ 105 1052
NGC 1351A 03 28.8 -35 11 14.2 SBbc 2.3′ 45 1241
ESO 358-10 03 29.7 -33 33 14.8 E 1.5′ 30 1620
NGC 1351 03 30.6 -34 51 12.4 E 3.2′ 60 1420
NGC 1350 03 31.1 -33 38 11.2 SBab 5.8′ 110 1785
NGC 1365 03 33.6 -36 08 10.3 SBb 11.0′ 205 1547
NGC 1366 03 33.9 -31 12 13.1 S0 1.9′ 35 1137
NGC 1374 03 35.3 -35 14 12.0 E 2.7′ 50 1240
NGC 1375 03 35.3 -35 16 13.4 S0 2.1′ 40 643
IC 335 03 35.5 -34 27 13.4 S0 2.3′ 45 1530
NGC 1379 03 36.1 -35 26 11.9 E 2.6′ 50 1264
NGC 1380 03 36.5 -34 59 11.1 S0 4.8′ 90 1737
NGC 1381 03 36.5 -35 18 12.7 S0 2.6′ 50 1673
NGC 1369 03 36.8 -36 15 13.6 Sa 1.7′ 30 1340
NGC 1386 03 36.8 -36 00 12.2 S0 3.4′ 65 755
NGC 1380A 03 36.8 -34 44 13.4 S0 2.5′ 45 1419
NGC 1387 03 37.0 -35 30 11.8 E 3.2′ 60 1219
NGC 1382 03 37.1 -35 12 13.8 E 1.5′ 30 1697
NGC 1389 03 37.2 -35 45 12.6 E 2.6′ 50 883
NGC 1399 03 38.5 -35 27 10.3 E 6.8′ 130 1335
NGC 1404 03 38.9 -35 36 10.9 E 4.1′ 75 1826
NGC 1406 03 39.4 -31 19 12.9 SBbc 3.9′ 75 963
NGC 1427A 03 40.1 -35 38 14.2 Irr 2.1′ 40 1927
ESO 358-50 03 41.1 -33 47 13.9 S0 1.6′ 30 1151
ESO 358-51 03 41.5 -34 53 14.1 Sa 1.5′ 30 1626
NGC 1425 03 42.2 -29 54 11.4 Sb 6.0′ 115 1402
NGC 1427 03 42.3 -35 24 11.8 E 3.6′ 70 1327
NGC 1428 03 42.4 -35 09 14.0 E 1.5′ 30 1602
ESO 358-54 03 43.0 -36 16 14.2 SBd 1.7′ 30 798
NGC 1437 03 43.6 -35 51 12.9 SBab 2.8′ 50 1296
ESO 358-60 03 45.2 -35 34 15.6 Irr 1.7′ 30 710
ESO 358-61 03 45.9 -36 22 14.0 Sc 2.5′ 45 1415
NGC 1460 03 46.2 -36 42 13.5 S0 1.7′ 30 1277
ESO 358-63 03 46.3 -34 57 12.6 Sc 4.8′ 90 1838
IC 1993 03 47.1 -33 42 12.5 SBb 2.5′ 45 1004
ESO 302-09 03 47.6 -38 35 14.6 SBd 2.2′ 40 908
ESO 302-14 03 51.7 -38 27 15.5 Irr 1.5′ 30 798
ESO 359-03 03 52.0 -33 28 14.1 Sab 1.8′ 35 1495
NGC 1484 03 54.3 -36 58 13.9 Sb 2.5′ 45 952
IC 2006 03 54.3 -35 58 12.5 E 1.9′ 35 1285
NGC 1531 04 11.2 -32 51 12.9 S0 1.3′ 1169
NGC 1532 04 12.1 -32 52 10.7 SBb 12.6′ 1040

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for Fornax Cluster. Retrieved 2006-10-08. 
  2. ^ a b c Jordán, A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Infante, L.; Mei, S.; Merritt, D.; Peng, E. W. et al. (June 2006). "The ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. I. Introduction to the Survey and Data Reduction Procedures". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 452 (1): 141–153. arXiv:astro-ph/0702320. Bibcode:2007ApJS..169..213J. doi:10.1086/512778. 
  3. ^ "Hubble Heritage Project". Dwarf Irregulars and Galaxy Clusters. Retrieved 2006-12-07. 
  4. ^ "Chandra X-Ray Observatory". Fornax Cluster: Motions of Nearby Galaxy Cluster Reveal Presence of Hidden Superstructure. Retrieved 2006-12-07. 
  5. ^ Drinkwater, Michael J.; Gregg, Michael D.; Colless, Matthew (February 2001). "Substructure and Dynamics of the Fornax Cluster". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 548 (2): L139. arXiv:astro-ph/0012415. Bibcode:2001ApJ...548L.139D. doi:10.1086/319113. 
  6. ^ "Fornax Cluster: Motions of Nearby Galaxy Cluster Reveal Presence of Hidden Superstructure". NASA. 30 April 2005. Retrieved 10 December 2012. 
  7. ^ Neill, James D.; Shara, Michael M.; Oegerle, William R. (January 2005). "Tramp Novae between Galaxies in the Fornax Cluster: Tracers of Intracluster Light". The Astrophysical Journal 618 (2): 692–704. arXiv:astro-ph/0409265. Bibcode:2005ApJ...618..692N. doi:10.1086/426049. 

Coordinates: Sky map 03h 38m 00s, −35° 27′ 00″

External links[edit]