Forrest Adair

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Forrest Adair (1865 – 1936) was a real estate dealer. He was the son of real-estate and streetcar developer Col. George Washington Adair and lived in Atlanta, Georgia He served as Fulton County (Georgia) Commissioner from 1895 until 1903. A member of the Yaarab Temple, he served as Potentate and was instrumental in the founding of the Scottish Rite Children's Hospital and the Shriners Hospitals for Children. Along with his brother, George Adair, Jr., he developed neighborhoods throughout what is the Atlanta, Georgia, area, including Adair Park, West End Park (now known as Westview), and, in conjunction with Asa Candler, Druid Hills.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Chronological List of Members of the Fulton County Board of Commissioner [1]
  • "Scottish Rite Hospital", from masonicinfo.com [2]
  • "Emory Village", from emoryvillage.org [3]
  • Past Imperial Potentate William B. Melish, The History of the Imperial Council, Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine For North America, 2nd ed., 1872-1921 (Cincinnati: The Abingdon Press, 1921), 237-238.
  • Fred van Deventer, Parade to Glory: The Story of the Shriners and Their Hospitals for Crippled Children (New York: William Morrow and Company, 1959), 97-100, 109, 180-182, 186, 190.
  • J. Ed. Hart, “...Unto the Least of These”: A Story of the Shriners’ Hospitals for Crippled Children (Greenville, South Carolina: The Board of Governors and the Staff of the Greenville, South Carolina Unit, Shiners’ Hospitals for Crippled Children, 1948), 20-27.
  • W. O. Saunders, “Let’s Stop Blowing Bubbles,” Collier's Weekly, 13 Sept. 1924; reprinted in The Builder, vol. X, No. 10.
  • Orient of Georgia, Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, “The Georgia Scottish Rite Charities” [4]
  • Noble Forrest Adair (Yaarab Shriners, Atlanta, Georgia), “The Bubbles Speech” (argument presented at the annual meeting of the Imperial Council of the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in Portland, Oregon on 22 June 1920), reprinted in Hart, supra, 20-24.
  • John D. McGilvray, The Shriners Finest Hour (San Francisco, California: Board of Governors, Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children, 1955)
  • W. Freeland Kendrick, “Echoes of the Past,” Shrine News, [publishing information unknown, presumably in the early 1940s], see Hart, supra, 25-27.