Fort Recovery, Ohio

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Fort Recovery, Ohio
Village
Victory monument in Fort Recovery
Victory monument in Fort Recovery
Location of Fort Recovery, Ohio
Location of Fort Recovery, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°24′44″N 84°46′40″W / 40.41222°N 84.77778°W / 40.41222; -84.77778Coordinates: 40°24′44″N 84°46′40″W / 40.41222°N 84.77778°W / 40.41222; -84.77778
Country United States
State Ohio
County Mercer
Townships Gibson and Recovery
Government
 • Mayor Roger Broerman[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.07 sq mi (2.77 km2)
 • Land 1.05 sq mi (2.72 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation[3] 942 ft (287 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 1,430
 • Estimate (2012[5]) 1,423
 • Density 1,361.9/sq mi (525.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45846
Area code(s) 419
FIPS code 39-27902[6]
GNIS feature ID 1040590[3]
Website http://www.fortrecovery.org/

Fort Recovery is a village in Mercer County, Ohio, United States. The population was 1,430 at the 2010 census. The village is near the location of Fort Recovery, first established in 1793 under orders from General Anthony Wayne.[7]

Fort Recovery was a stop along the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad that connected Pittsburgh to Chicago and St. Louis.

Geography[edit]

The former location of the Wabash River running by the former location of the original Fort Recovery.

Fort Recovery is located at 40°24′44″N 84°46′40″W / 40.412156°N 84.777641°W / 40.412156; -84.777641.[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.07 square miles (2.77 km2), of which, 1.05 square miles (2.72 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 102
1890 456 347.1%
1900 698 53.1%
1910 708 1.4%
1920 754 6.5%
1930 796 5.6%
1940 822 3.3%
1950 827 0.6%
1960 833 0.7%
1970 847 1.7%
1980 859 1.4%
1990 901 4.9%
2000 1,006 11.7%
2010 1,430 42.1%
Religion in Fort Recovery
religion percent
Roman Catholic
  
78.4%
Protestant
  
16.3%
No Religion
  
5.1%
"Unspecified"
  
0.2%

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 1,430 people, 555 households, and 391 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,361.9 inhabitants per square mile (525.8 /km2). There were 589 housing units at an average density of 561.0 per square mile (216.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.7% White, 0.1% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 0.7% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 555 households of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 29.5% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.16.

The median age in the village was 34.8 years. 28.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.7% were from 25 to 44; 24% were from 45 to 64; and 14.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 51.0% male and 49.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 1,273 people, 508 households, and 353 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,324.9 people per square mile (512.0/km2). There were 536 housing units at an average density of 557.8 per square mile (215.6/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 98.74% White, 0.08% African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.55% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 0.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.94% of the population.

There were 508 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.5% were married couples living together, 9.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 28.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the village the population was spread out with 26.0% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.8 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $41,471, and the median income for a family was $48,676. Males had a median income of $34,219 versus $22,361 for females. The per capita income for the village was $17,600. About 2.8% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.2% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.

Cannonballs left over from Fort Recovery, now seen at the replica.

History[edit]

Two well known battles of the American Indian Wars happened here. St. Clair's Defeat happened here in 1791 and the Attack on Fort Recovery happened here in 1794.

In 1818 a Virginia soldier who fought at the battle of St. Clair's Defeat returned to the area in search of silver he left by a standing Oak tree. The soldier remained in the area for an unknown amount of time and was later found dead in the woods. In 1852 a local resident struck metal with a grubbing hoe. The metal was iron bands encasing a small wooden box. 900 pieces of Spanish doubloons were found, valued at $14,000, in 1852.[9]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Village Officials
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  3. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  6. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 129. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ History of Van Wert and Mercer Counties Ohio. Wapakoneta, OH: R. Sutton & Co. 1882. p. 446. 

External links[edit]