Fougère

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Fougère, pronounced: [fu.ʒɛʁ], meaning "fern-like", is one of the main families into which modern perfumes are classified, with the name derived from the perfume Fougère Royale (Houbigant) by Paul Parquet, now preserved in the archives of the Osmothèque. This class of fragrances have the basic accord with a top-note of lavender and base-notes of oakmoss and coumarin (Tonka bean). Aromatic fougère, a derivative of this class, contains additional notes of herbs, spice and/or wood.

Members of the family are especially popular as fragrances for men. Many modern fougère perfumes have various citrus, herbaceous, green, floral and animalic notes included. The most common modifiers to this basic accord include vetiver and geranium. Bergamot is often present to add sharpness to the lavender top-note.

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Further reading[edit]

  • New Perfume Handbook Editor N. Groom, Springer Science & Business Media, 1997, ISBN 0751404039, 9780751404036