Foundation for a Drug-Free World

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Foundation for a Drug Free World
Foundation for a Drug-Free World.png
Founded October 2006 (2006-10)
Type Non-profit (religious)
Tax ID no. 20-5812172
Focus Drug abuse prevention
Location
Origins Church of Scientology
Area served Worldwide
Method Anti-drug booklets, public service announcements, drug awareness events
Members Unknown
Key people Gail Carroll
Aris Gregorian
Revenue Unknown
Expenses Unknown
Endowment Unknown
Employees Unknown
Volunteers Unknown
Website www.drugfreeworld.org

Foundation for a Drug-Free World (FDFW) is an anti-drug organization established in 2006 by the Church of Scientology.[1] There has been controversy about the claims made by the foundation and about its support by public organizations who were not aware of its link to Scientology.

History[edit]

The Foundation for a Drug-Free World was founded in October 2006. In 2008, it partnered with the United Nations for International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking.[2]

Relation to Scientology and Narconon[edit]

In 2012, the police department of Santa Ana distributed anti-drug pamphlets provided by the Foundation for a Drug-Free World. A reporter called the contact number on the pamphlets and asked where to get help for drug abuse. He was directed to Narconon Arrowhead, the flagship rehab centre of Narcon International, which is classified as a Scientology related entity by the IRS. The SAPD withdrew the pamphlets after the reported link.[3]

On September 9, 2009, a resident discovered pamphlets produced by the Foundation outside a police town hall meeting in Northern Liberties, Philadelphia. The pamphlets read, "The first step is to understand why a person becomes trapped by drugs. In May 1969, when the international drug crisis was reaching its peak, author and humanitarian L. Ron Hubbard wrote: 'When a person is depressed or in pain and where he finds no physical relief from treatment, he will eventually discover for himself that drugs remove his symptoms. . ." Another paragraph in the pamphlets read, "And for the person with a drug problem, there are also real solutions to addiction. Narconon, a drug rehabilitation program that utilizes the methods of L. Ron Hubbard, has a success rate of more than 75% . . ." L. Ron Hubbard is the founder of Scientology and the inventor of Narconon drug rehabilitation program.[4]

The "Drug-Free Marshal" program started in November, 2008, at Las Cruces, New Mexico. The Foundation for a Drug-Free World supplied the pamphlets, at the bottom of which contained a notice of copyright by Foundation for a Drug-Free World, Narconon and Association for Better Living and Education, all programs sponsored by the Church of Scientology. After the city mayor found out that the anti-drug program was created and bankrolled by the Church of Scientology, he apologized and ended the program.[5]

After an investigation by the State of California into the Narconon anti-drug education program, State Superintendent Jack O'Connell urged all California schools to drop the program for its inaccurate and unscientific information[6] in 2005, the year before the Foundation for a Drug-Free World was founded.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "What is the Foundation for a Drug Free World?". Retrieved 2013-08-09. 
  2. ^ "Family Participates in Drug-Awareness Event". Bellevue Reporter. 2008-07-17. Retrieved 2013-08-16. 
  3. ^ Dulaney, Josh (2012-05-16). "Anti-drug Pamphlets Linked to Scientology Gone From Santa Ana Police Department". Orange County Weekly. Retrieved 2013-07-24. 
  4. ^ Thompson, Isaiah (2009-09-25). "Did Scientologists infiltrate NoLibs Town Hall Meeting?". Philadelphia City Paper. Retrieved 2013-07-25. 
  5. ^ Meeks, Ashley (2008-12-07). "Mayor abandons anti-drug program affiliated with Church of Scientology". Las Cruces Sun-News. Retrieved 2013-07-25. 
  6. ^ Asimov, Nanette (2005-02-23). "Schools Urged to Drop Antidrug Program / Scientology-linked Teachings Inaccurate, Superintendent Says". SFGate. Retrieved 2013-07-23. 

External links[edit]