Four Dharmadhātu

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The Four Dharmadhatu (Chinese: 四法界), is a philosophical concept propagated by Master Tu-shun (Chinese: 杜順; 557-640 CE),[1] the founder of Hua-yan (Chinese: 華嚴) school. It builds upon and is a variant of the Dharmadhatu doctrine.

The Four Dharmadhatu[edit]

The Four Dharmadhatu were outlined in Tu-shun's treatise which has been rendered into English as 'On the Meditation of Dharmadhātu'. The Four Dharmadhatu are:

  • The Dharmadhātu of 'Shih' (Chinese: 事法界; "shi fajie"). 'Shih' is a rendering of the character 事 which holds the semantic field: "matter", "phenomenon", "event". It may be understood as the 'realm' (Sanskrit: dhātu) of all matters and phenomena.
  • The Dharmadhātu of 'Li'(Chinese: 理法界; "li fajie"). 'Li' is a rendering of the character 理 which holds the semantic field: "principle", "law", "noumenon". This 'realm' (Sanskrit: dhātu) may be understood as that of principles. It has been referred to as "the realm of the one principle". The "one principle" being qualified as śūnyatā (Sanskrit).[2]
  • The Dharmadhātu of Non-obstruction of 'Li' against 'Shih' (Chinese: 理事無礙法界; "lishi wuai fajie"). This 'realm' (Sanskrit: dhātu) has been rendered into English as "the realm of non-obstruction between principle and phenomena".[3]
  • The Dharmadhātu of the Non-obstruction of 'Shih' and 'Shih' (Chinese: 事事無礙法界; "shishi wuai fajie"). This 'realm' (Sanskrit: dhātu) has been rendered into English as "the realm of non-obstruction between phenomena".[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Samanta Buddhist Glossary (2006). "Four Dharmadhātu". Source: [1] (accessed: January 28, 2008)
  2. ^ Samanta Buddhist Glossary (2006). "Four Dharmadhātu". Source: [2] (accessed: January 28, 2008)
  3. ^ Samanta Buddhist Glossary (2006). "Four Dharmadhātu". Source: [3] (accessed: January 28, 2008)
  4. ^ Samanta Buddhist Glossary (2006). "Four Dharmadhātu". Source: [4] (accessed: January 28, 2008)

Further reading[edit]

  • Oh, Kang-nam (2000). The Taoist Influence on Hua-yen Buddhism: A Case of the Sinicization of Buddhism in China. Chung-Hwa Buddhist Journal, No. 13, (2000). Source: [5] (accessed: January 28, 2008)

External links[edit]