FrameGang

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FrameGang
Framegang icon.gif
FrameGang screenshot.gif
FrameGang in Windows 95
Developer(s) Sausage Software
Initial release April 6, 1996 (1996-04-06)
Discontinued 1.051 / April 1996; 18 years ago (1996-04)
Development status Abandonware
Written in Microsoft Visual Basic 4.0[a 1]
Operating system Windows 3.1 / 3.11 / 95
Platform Windows
Size
  • 2.17MB FrameGang 32[1]

*1.68MB FrameGang 16[1]
Available in English
Type HTML editor
License Proprietary
Website http://wwww.sausage.com/framgang.htm (Archive.org)

FrameGang was an applet for developing HTML frames for Netscape released by Sausage Software in April 1996. The program featured a drag-and-drop interface that allowed users to define the number, size and position of the HTML frames without knowledge of HTML.[2][3][4] It was one of the four "snaglets" along with Crosseye, Flash, and Clickette that were released by Sausage Software that month.[5]

FrameGang used non-standard HTML tags which were meant to be used with Netscape, and thus not all browsers were able to use the frames created.[1]

FrameGang is no longer for sale by Sausage Software.

Features[edit]

FrameGang could handle multiple frames, allowed previewing and saving of the frames, and generated html code for the frames which could then be used in HotDog. FrameGang allowed for the development of frames without knowledge of html.[6][a 2] The program was also accompanied with help features and tutorials on building frames.[1][2][7][8]

FrameGang was considered an "addon" to Sausage Software's popular HotDog Professional 2.0 which didn't have frame support.[9][10][11]

FrameGang did not have any known bugs.[12]

Reception[edit]

FrameGang was well received and was recommended in PC/Computing magazine's list of "1,001 Top Free Internet Downloads" for 1997.[13][14]

"FrameGang is an excellent way to create Netscape frames for HTML documents."

— ZD Net Software Library, 13 May 1996.[5]

"Some of us want to get down and dirty with HTML tags and some of us don't, and the lowest and dirtiest tags currently about would probably be those dealing with frames. To avoid the agony (or ecstasy if you enjoy this sort of thing), use FrameGang."

—Australian Net Guide[15]

It was also praised for its ease of use and in-depth tutorials on html frames.[2]

FrameGang was recommended for those using Netscape Navigator Gold 3 which didn't yet support frame development even though the Netscape Navigator browser did support frames.[16]

Frame Gang[edit]

Frame gang (left to right):
X, Gus, Vin, Joe, Stan

The frame gang is used in the FrameGang Help file to represent different section graphically. The frame gang consists of 5 members: X, Gus, Vin, Joe, Stan. Several members also had a slogan. [a 3]

  • Gus-Represents "advanced information". Slogan: I'm Gus...look at me when I'm talkin!
  • Vin- Shown in the splash screen, and used in the icon.
  • Joe - Represents the "basic information" about FrameGang. Slogan: I'm Joe...whadda you lookin at!
  • Stan- Represents "more answers". Slogan: Hello I'm Stan!

When creating new frames, a member of the frame gang would initially fill up that frame.

Editions[edit]

FrameGang splashscreen showing Vin.

FrameGang was a 32-bit application written for Windows 95 released in April 1996.[17] Fourthnet, the European distributor for HotDog, began marketing all of Sausage Software's snaglets including FrameGang in June 1996.[18] A 16-bit version for Windows 3.1 was released on December 17, 1996 along with 16-bit versions of Dummy, Gatling, and Bandwidth Buster.[19] The 32-bit edition originally sold for US$50/A$70, but the price was later reduced to US$25/£25 on May 22, 1996.[9][20][21][a 4][1][22][23]

FrameGang was also available at tucows.

The editions came with a 14-day evaluation period.[1]

The following dll's are required to run FrameGang:[17]

  • RPCRT4.DLL
  • MSVCRT20.DLL
  • MSVCRT40.DLL
  • OLEPRO32.DLL (dated September 29, 1995 or newer)
  • OLEAUT32.DLL (dated October 6, 1995 or newer)
  • OLE32.DLL
  • VB40032.DLL
  • MFC40.DLL (dated October 6, 1995 or newer)

System requirements[edit]

FrameGang had the following system requirements:[1][a 5]

See also[edit]

Annotations[edit]

  1. ^ FrameGang requires "VB40032.DLL" to run. Vb40032.dll is the run-time engine used by applications developed in Microsoft Visual Basic version 4.0 32-bit. See Vb4Run.exe Run-Time .dlls for Visual Basic 4.0 Apps at Microsoft for more information.
  2. ^ In the FrameGang "fghelp" file in version 1a, it states "FrameGang shields you from having to know about frame HTML syntax." under the 'Jargon Buster' section.
  3. ^ In the FrameGang "fghelp" file in version 1a, it uses the various FrameGang members throughout the help file.
  4. ^ In the FrameGang "fghelp" file in version 1a, it lists the price for FrameGang as US$50 and A$70 under the 'I want to order...pronto!' section.
  5. ^ In the FrameGang "fghelp" file "FrameGang Help V1.41" , it list system requirements under 'Frequently Asked Questions' under question "What’s the minimum system configuration I can use?"

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "All About FrameGang". Sausage Software. 1997. Archived from the original on 10 February 1997. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c "Compuflash Bulletin". Compunews. Computrain. 1 January 1999. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 
  3. ^ "FOURTHNET: FourthNet introduce full range of Web tools into Europe". M2 Presswire. 25 June 1996. 
  4. ^ "Sausage Software". Fourthnet. 1997. Archived from the original on 6 May 1997. Retrieved 18 April 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Press Releases". Sausage Software. 1997. Archived from the original on 10 February 1997. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 
  6. ^ Preston, Gralla (1 March 1997). "Web Tools". Windows Sources (Factiva) 05 (03). 
  7. ^ Brent D. Heslop; David A. Holzgang (1998). HTML publishing on the Internet: everything you need to create professional-looking Web pages. Coriolis Ventana. p. 580. ISBN 978-1-56604-625-1. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 
  8. ^ Gralla, Preston (1 February 1997). "Programs That Make it Easy to Publish a Polished Web Site". Computer Shopper (Factiva) 17 (2). 
  9. ^ a b Elaine X., Elliott (1 December 1996). "The Dynamics Of Web Design". Computer Shopper (Factavia) 16. (12). ISSN 0886-0556. 
  10. ^ Bowtell, Jed (April 9, 1996). "Scaling Everest on the Net". News (Age, The (Melbourne, Australia)). 
  11. ^ "PRODUCT BITS:FOURTHNET INTRODUCES NEW HOTDOG ADDONS". M2 Communications (Telecomworldwire). 25 June 1996. 
  12. ^ "Snaglet Known Bugs". Fourthnet. Archived from the original on 6 May 1997. Retrieved 18 April 2010. 
  13. ^ "1,001 Top Free Internet Downloads". PC/Computing (Factiva) 10 (6). 1 June 1997. 
  14. ^ Mark Bishop (February 1998). How to build a successful international web site. Coriolis. p. 46. ISBN 978-1-57610-158-2. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 
  15. ^ "All About FrameGang". Sausage Software. 1997. Archived from the original on 29 January 1998. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  16. ^ Brent D. Heslop; Gus Venditto (1997). Webheads guide to Netscape: using, authoring, and programming. Random House. pp. 204–205. ISBN 978-0-679-76892-0. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 
  17. ^ a b "All About FrameGang". Sausage Software. 1995. Archived from the original on 20 October 1996. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  18. ^ "FourthNet introduce full range of Web tools into Europe". Snaglets. June 1996. Archived from the original on 6 May 1997. Retrieved 18 April 2010. 
  19. ^ "What's new at Sausage Software". Sausage Software. 1997. Archived from the original on 10 February 1997. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  20. ^ "The FrameGang Is Here - and they're coming to get you!". All About FrameGang. Fourthnet. 1995. Archived from the original on 6 May 1997. Retrieved 18 April 2010. 
  21. ^ "Older News at Sausage Software". Sausage Software. 1997. Archived from the original on 10 February 1997. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  22. ^ Tony McDonald, David Surtees, Janet Wheeler (October 1995 – May 1996). "Software Tools for the World-Wide Web". A Survey. Computing Service, University of Newcastle. p. 8. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 
  23. ^ "How To Purchase Sausage Software Products". Sausage Software. 1997. Archived from the original on 10 February 1997. Retrieved 14 April 2010. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]