François Croteau

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François Croteau
Borough mayor for Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie and Montreal City Councillor
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 1, 2010
Preceded by André Lavallée
Personal details
Born (1972-01-29) January 29, 1972 (age 42)
Political party Vision Montréal (2009-2011)
Projet Montréal (2011-)
Residence Montreal, Quebec
Occupation Professor

François Croteau (born January 29, 1972) is a city councillor from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. He has served as the borough mayor of Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie since 2009. Elected as a member of the Vision Montreal municipal political party he crossed the floor to Projet Montréal in November 2011.[1]

Croteau was born and raised in the north shore suburb of Terrebonne.[2]

He received a bachelor's degree in history, art history and sociology from the Université de Montréal.[2][3] He also holds a Master of Business Administration from the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM).[1][2] He was a sessional lecturer at UQAM, teaching courses on city management,[3] and is writing his doctoral thesis in urban studies.[1][2] He has also served as a political staff member of Nicolas Girard the Parti Québécois MNA for Gouin prior to being elected to city council.[3]

On June 19, 2013, he declared himself a candidate for the job of interim mayor of Montreal after the resignation of Michael Applebaum.[4] However, in the council session on June 25 to select the new interim mayor, Croteau withdrew his candidacy before the vote, supporting eventual winner Laurent Blanchard.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c RAVENSBERGEN, JAN (2011-11-04). "Borough mayor François Croteau to join Projet Montréal". The Gazette (Montreal). Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Détail d'un élu: Monsieur François W. Croteau". Arrondissement Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie. Ville de Montréal. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c jeunes, Les; Harel, Louise (2009-10-09). "Un maire rockeur ! - Portrait de François Croteau". Vision Montreal. Retrieved 12 February 2012. 
  4. ^ "Coalition crumbles as candidates emerge for Montreal mayor". The Gazette, June 20, 2013.
  5. ^ "Laurent Blanchard new interim mayor of Montreal". The Gazette, June 25, 2013.

External links[edit]