Françoise Meltzer

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Françoise Meltzer (born 1947) is a professor of Philosophy of Religion at the University of Chicago Divinity School.[1] She is also the Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor of the Humanities and Chair of Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago.

Work[edit]

Meltzer's scholarship includes work on contemporary critical theory and nineteenth-century French literature. She marshals postmodern critical theories in order to explore literary representations of the subject.

In her book Hot Property: The Stakes and Claims of Literary Originality, she examines the ideas of originality and authorship in a series of case studies from Descartes to Walter Benjamin. In her book on Joan of Arc, she undertakes a study of that figure in relation to subjectivity as it is treated in philosophical and literary theoretical courses.

Meltzer co-edited a Symposium on [God] for the journal Critical Inquiry. With Jas' Elsner, Meltzer co-edited a special issue of Critical Inquiry on theories of saints and sainthood in three monotheistic religions. She is co-editing a book on religion and postmodernist texts, and also working on two monographs; one about 1848 in France, and the concept of rupture from a philosophical, political, and literary point of view; the other about the gendering of subjectivity.

Education[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • (1987) Salome and the Dance of Writing: Portraits of Diegesis in Literature
  • (1988) The Trial(s) of Psychoanalysis, sed.
  • (1994) Hot Property: The Stakes and Claims of Literary Originality
  • (2001) For Fear, Fire: Joan of Arc and the Limits of Subjectivity
  • (2011) Double Vision: Baudelaire's Modernity

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maler, Sandra (October 28, 2004). "‘French’ becomes a dirty word in US campaign". Daily Times. Retrieved 23 March 2012.