Fran Bailey

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The Honourable
Fran Bailey
Fran Bailey.jpg
Member of the Australian Parliament
for McEwen
In office
24 March 1990 – 13 March 1993
Preceded by Peter Cleeland
Succeeded by Peter Cleeland
In office
2 March 1996 – 19 July 2010
Preceded by Peter Cleeland
Succeeded by Rob Mitchell
Minister for Employment Participation
In office
18 July, 2004 – 26 October, 2004
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by Mal Brough
Succeeded by Peter Dutton
Minister for Small Business
In office
9 October, 2004 – 24 November, 2007
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by Joe Hockey
Succeeded by Craig Emerson
Minister for Tourism
In office
9 October, 2004 – 24 November, 2007
Prime Minister John Howard
Preceded by Joe Hockey
Succeeded by Martin Ferguson
Personal details
Born (1946-05-21) 21 May 1946 (age 68)
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Nationality Australian
Political party Liberal Party
Alma mater University of Queensland

Frances Esther "Fran" Bailey (born 21 May 1946) is an Australian former politician. She was a Liberal member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1990 to 1993 and again from 1996 to 2010, representing the electorate of McEwen in Victoria. She was also a Cabinet Minister in the Howard Government. She retired from politics at the Australian federal election, 2010.

Personal life[edit]

Fran Bailey was born in Brisbane and attended All Hallows' School there,[1] where she was regarded as a champion swimmer.[2] She graduated from the University of Queensland[3] and Kelvin Grove Teachers' College,[2] later studying sociology at La Trobe University.[3]

Career[edit]

Bailey worked as a secondary school teacher, retailer and cashmere goat breeder before entering politics.[2] She was secretary of the Yarra Glen branch of the Liberal Party from 1984 to 1988 and President of the branch from 1988 to 1989. She also worked as the campaign director for the Victorian state seat of Evelyn at the 1988 election.

Bailey was first elected to the House of Representatives at the 1990 election, defeating Labor incumbent Peter Cleeland. She became the first female Liberal candidate elected to a Victorian seat, and the first woman elected to represent a rural electorate.[4]

She was promoted to Shadow Minister for Consumer Affairs, and was heavily involved with the Liberals' 'Fightback!' campaign to regain power. Cleeland defeated her in the 1993 election, a rematch of 1990. However, she won the seat back in 1996, defeating Cleeland in another rematch. She served on the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade from 1998 to 2002.

In 2001, Bailey was promoted to Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Defence. In July 2004 she was promoted to Minister for Employment Services and Assistant Minister for Defence. She became Minister for Small Business and Tourism in October 2004. In 2006, she flew to London with Lara Bingle to lobby the Broadcast Advertising Clearance Centre for the right to use the word "bloody" in advertisements promoting Australia (see So where the bloody hell are you?).

Her period as minister ended with the defeat of the Howard government at the 2007 election. Her hold on McEwen was always somewhat tenuous, in large part because of the urban-rural mix of the seat. It includes several outer northern suburbs of Melbourne that tilt heavily to Labor, as well as some rural territory that votes Liberal. However, the 2007 election resulted in McEwen becoming the most marginal seat in the country. Fran Bailey was initially found to have lost to former Labor state MP Rob Mitchell by six votes. Bailey requested and was granted a full recount, which resulted in a change in the lead and a twelve-vote victory for her. The result was challenged in the High Court of Australia in its capacity as the Court of Disputed Returns, and was referred to the Federal Court of Australia. Over seven months after the election and a review of 643 individual votes, the court altered the formal status of several dozen, eventually declaring Bailey the winner by 27 votes. Following the resolution of the long-running dispute, Bailey called for a total overhaul of the voting system.[5][6][7]

Bailey announced in October 2009 that she would retire at the next Australian federal election.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Perkin, Corrie. (28 February 2009). "Member at the seat of the fire". The Australian. Retrieved 16 January 2013.
  2. ^ a b c Gleeson, Peter. (27 November 2004). "Minister to rekindle Coast affair". The Gold Coast Bulletin, Southport, Queensland. p20.
  3. ^ a b "Life so far for an All Hallows girl" (26 October 2004). The Gold Coast Bulletin, Southport, Queensland. p5.
  4. ^ "Liberal Party – profile of Fran Bailey", Liberal Party of Australia. Archived from the original on 11 November 2007. Retrieved 16 January 2013.
  5. ^ Doherty, Ben (3 July 2008). "Court confirms Bailey win: The Age 3/7/2008". Melbourne: Theage.com.au. Retrieved 2010-06-04. 
  6. ^ "Labor loses bid to win back McEwen: ABC 2/7/2008". Abc.net.au. 2 July 2008. Retrieved 2010-06-04. 
  7. ^ "Mitchell v Bailey (No 2) 2008 FCA 692: Federal Court of Australia Decisions 2/7/2008". Austlii.edu.au. Retrieved 2010-06-04. 
  8. ^ "Fran Bailey announces retirement: ABC News 7/10/2009". Abc.net.au. 7 October 2009. Retrieved 2010-06-04. 

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Malcolm Brough
Minister for Employment Services
2004
Succeeded by
Peter Dutton
as Minister for Workforce Participation
Preceded by
Joe Hockey
Minister for Small Business and Tourism
2004–2007
Succeeded by
Craig Emerson
as Minister for Small Business,
Independent Contractors and the Service Economy
Succeeded by
Martin Ferguson
as Minister for Tourism
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Peter Cleeland
Member for McEwen
1990–1993
Succeeded by
Peter Cleeland
Preceded by
Peter Cleeland
Member for McEwen
1996–2010
Succeeded by
Rob Mitchell