France women's national football team

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France
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Les Bleues (The Blues)
Association French Football Federation
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Philippe Bergeroo
Captain Wendie Renard
Most caps Sandrine Soubeyrand (198)
Top scorer Marinette Pichon (81)
FIFA code FRA
FIFA ranking 3Increase [1]
Highest FIFA ranking 3 (December 2014)
Lowest FIFA ranking 10 (September 2009)
First colours
Second colours
First international
 France 2–0 England 
(Manchester, England; October 1920)
Biggest win

 France 14–0 Algeria 
(Cesson-Sévigné, France; 14 May 1998)

 France 14–0 Bulgaria 
(Le Mans, France; 28 November 2013)
Biggest defeat
 United States 8–0 France 
(Indianapolis, United States; 29 April 1996)
World Cup
Appearances 3 (First in 2003)
Best result Fourth Place, 2011
European Championship
Appearances 5 (First in 1997)
Best result Quarter-finalists, 2009

The French women's national football team (French: Fédération Française de Football > Féminin A) represents France in international women's football. The team is directed by the French Football Federation (FFF) and competes as a member of UEFA in various international football tournaments such as the FIFA Women's World Cup, UEFA Women's Euro, the Summer Olympics, and the Algarve Cup.

The France women's national team initially struggled on the international stage failing to qualify for three of the first FIFA Women's World Cups and the six straight UEFA European Championships before reaching the quarter-finals in the 1997 edition of the competition. However, since the beginning of the new millennium, France have become a mid-tier national team and one of the most consistent in Europe having qualified for their first-ever FIFA Women's World Cup in 2003 and reaching the quarter-finals in two of the three European Championships held since 2000. In 2011, France recorded a fourth-place finish at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup; its best finish overall at the competition. In the following year, the club captured the 2012 Cyprus Cup.

The current manager of the national team is Philippe Bergeroo. He replaced Bruno Bini on September 11, 2013.[2] The current captain of the national team is 23-year-old centre back Wendie Renard.[3]

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

In 1919, a women's football championship was established in France by the Fédération des Sociétés Féminines Sportives de France (FSFSF). On 29 April 1920, a team led by French women's football pioneer Alice Milliat traveled to England and played its first international match against English team Dick, Kerr's Ladies. The match, held in Preston, attracted more than 25,000 spectators. France won the match 2–0 and ended its tour with two wins, one draw, and one defeat. The following year, a return match in France at the Stade Pershing in Vincennes, a suburb of Paris, took place in front of over 12,000 spectators. The match ended in a 1–1 draw. In May 1921, France returned to England for friendlies. The team won its first match 5–1, then suffered three consecutive defeats. In October 1921, the English team returned to France contesting matches in Paris and Le Havre with both matches ending in stalemates. Despite women's football in England being prohibited by The Football Association in December 1921, France continued to go there on tour for matches. A victory for the French in Plymouth was followed by 0–0 draws in Exeter and Falmouth. By 1932, the female game had been called to an end and the women's league formed in 1919 by the FSFSF was discontinued. The last match by the FSFSF international team was another scoreless draw against Belgium on 3 April 1932.

Throughout the late 1960s in France, particularly in Reims, local players worked hard to promote awareness and the acceptance of women's football. A year before getting officially sanctioned, France took part in a makeshift European Cup against England, Denmark, and Italy. The tournament was won by the Italians. The Federal Council of the French Football Federation officially reinstated women's football in 1970 and France played its first official international match on 17 April 1971 against the Netherlands in Hazebrouck. That same year, France took part in the unofficial 1971 Women's World Cup, held in Mexico. The ladies continued the pirate games, which just made it into the margins of FIFA's records, until FIFA began overseeing the competition in 1991. Since 1982, UEFA has governed the European games.

Reinstatement[edit]

In 1975, the women's football league was officially reinstated, this time with backing from the French Football Federation, the governing body of football in France. Stade Reims was the best team in the country throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, thus constituted much of the French national squad. For the non-official World Cup in 1978 in Taiwan, the team included the entire Reims squad. The team shared the title with Finland, who never actually played the final. Due to receiving minimal support from the French Football Federation, who ultimately looked at women's football as not being highly regarded, France struggled in international competition failing to advance past the first round of qualification in both the 1984 and 1987 UEFA Women's Championship. Francis Coché, who managed the team during these failures, was later replaced by Aimé Mignot. Mignot helped the team finally get past the first round, however, in the quarterfinals, they lost to Italy, which meant they wouldn't appear at the 1989 UEFA Women's Championship. Despite the initial positives, Mignot failed to continue his success with France failing to qualify for both the 1991 and 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup and losing in the first round of qualification in three straight UEFA Women's Championships. After almost a decade in charge, Mignot was replaced by former women's international Élisabeth Loisel.

With Loisel in charge, the FFF, along with then France national football team manager Aimé Jacquet, moved the women's national team to Clairefontaine, which had quickly become a high-level training facility for male football players. As a result of the move, younger women were afforded the same benefits from the facilities offered by Clairefontaine as the men. The success of female training led to the formation of the Centre National de Formation et d'Entraînement de Clairefontaine, which is now referred to as the female section of the Clairefontaine academy. Under the tutelage of Loisel, the first results appeared encouraging. They reached their first-ever Women's World Cup qualifying for the 2003 edition after defeating England over two legs in a play-off game in London and again at the Stade Geoffroy-Guichard. The match in Saint-Étienne attracted more than 23,000 spectators and was broadcast by the popular French broadcasting company Canal Plus. Loisel's squad later qualified for the 2005 European Championship, where they were knocked out in the group stage. She was eventually sacked after failing to qualify for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Team under Bruno Bini[edit]

Loisel was replaced by former football player and now coach Bruno Bini. Bini had been in charge of several France female international youth sides before accepting the role and was tasked with the job of qualifying for UEFA Women's Euro 2009. Due to the success of the Clairefontaine project and the surprising emergence of the French women's first division, Division 1 Féminine, Bini inherited a team full of emerging, young, and influential talent, which included the likes of Camille Abily, Sonia Bompastor, Louisa Necib, Élise Bussaglia, Laura Georges, and Corine Franco. Bini was also provided with leadership from captain Sandrine Soubeyrand. Early results under Bini were extremely positive with France finishing first in their Euro qualifying group only conceded two goals. France also performed well in friendly tournaments, such as the Nordic Cup and Cyprus Cup. At UEFA Women's Euro 2009, France were inserted into the group of death, which consisted of themselves, world powerhouse Germany, no. 7 ranked Norway, and an underrated Iceland. France finished the group with 4 points, alongside Norway, with Germany leading the group. As a result of the competition's rules, all three nations qualified for the quarterfinals. In the knockout rounds, France suffered defeat to the Netherlands losing 5–4 on penalties after no goals were scored in regular time and extra time.[4]

2011 Women's World Cup[edit]

The French team at the 2011 Women's World Cup prior to the 2–4 first round loss to Germany on 5 July 2011.

Bini's next task was to qualify for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup after the disappointment of four years earlier. In the team's qualifying group, France finished the campaign scoring 50 goals and conceded none over the course of ten matches (all wins). On 16 September 2010, France qualified for the World Cup following the team's 3–2 aggregate victory over Italy.

At the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany, France qualified to the knockout stage by finishing in second place in its group after wins over Nigeria and Canada, and a loss to the host team. The team went on to beat England on penalty kicks in the quarterfinals, but lost to the United States in the semi-finals. France finished the competition in fourth place and earned qualification to the Olympic football tournament at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London; it was the nation's first appearance in the competition. Striker Marie-Laure Delie was the only multiple goal scorer for France in the tournament, while defenders Sonia Bompastor and Laura Georges as well as midfielder Louisa Necib were selected to the All-Star Team.

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

Caps and goals as of 26 November 2014, after the team's match against Brazil.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Céline Deville (1982-01-24) January 24, 1982 (age 32) 64 0 France Juvisy
16 1GK Sarah Bouhaddi (1986-10-17) October 17, 1986 (age 28) 88 0 France Lyon
22 1GK Amandine Guerin (1993-02-18) 18 February 1993 (age 21) 0 0 France Soyaux
2 2DF Wendie Renard (1990-07-20) July 20, 1990 (age 24) 59 16 France Lyon
3 2DF Laure Boulleau (1986-10-22) October 22, 1986 (age 28) 52 0 France Paris Saint-Germain
4 2DF Laura Georges (1984-08-20) August 20, 1984 (age 30) 156 6 France Paris Saint-Germain
5 2DF Sabrina Delannoy (1986-05-18) May 18, 1986 (age 28) 21 2 France Paris Saint-Germain
7 2DF Griedge Mbock Bathy Nka (1995-02-26) February 26, 1995 (age 19) 7 0 France Guingamp
8 2DF Jessica Houara (1987-09-29) September 29, 1987 (age 27) 27 0 France Paris Saint-Germain
20 2DF Anaïg Butel (1992-02-15) February 15, 1992 (age 22) 3 0 France Juvisy
22 2DF Amel Majri (1993-01-25) January 25, 1993 (age 21) 5 1 France Lyon
6 3MF Amandine Henry (1989-09-28) September 28, 1989 (age 25) 32 3 France Lyon
10 3MF Aurélie Kaci (1989-12-19) December 19, 1989 (age 25) 2 0 France Paris Saint-Germain
12 3MF Élodie Thomis (1986-08-13) August 13, 1986 (age 28) 112 30 France Lyon
13 3MF Kenza Dali (1991-07-31) July 31, 1991 (age 23) 5 1 France Paris Saint-Germain
14 3MF Louisa Nécib (1987-01-23) January 23, 1987 (age 27) 123 32 France Lyon
15 3MF Élise Bussaglia (1985-09-24) September 24, 1985 (age 29) 138 26 France Lyon
19 3MF Marina Makanza (1991-07-01) 1 July 1991 (age 23) 14 0 France Montpellier
23 3MF Kheira Hamraoui (1990-01-13) January 13, 1990 (age 24) 11 0 France Paris Saint-Germain
9 4FW Eugénie Le Sommer (1989-05-18) May 18, 1989 (age 25) 97 39 France Lyon
11 4FW Claire Lavogez (1994-06-18) June 18, 1994 (age 20) 3 0 France Montpellier
17 4FW Gaëtane Thiney (1985-10-28) October 28, 1985 (age 29) 115 51 France Juvisy
18 4FW Marie-Laure Delie (1988-01-29) January 29, 1988 (age 26) 80 57 France Paris Saint-Germain
24 4FW Kadidiatou Diani (1995-04-01) April 1, 1995 (age 19) 1 1 France Juvisy

Recent call-ups[edit]

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Méline Gérard (1990-05-30) 30 May 1990 (age 24) 0 0 France Lyon v.  Finland, 17 September 2014
GK Laëtitia Philippe (1991-04-30) 30 April 1991 (age 23) 3 0 France Montpellier v.  Hungary, 20 August 2014
GK Karima Benameur (1989-04-13) April 13, 1989 (age 25) 2 0 France Paris Saint-Germain v.  Sweden, 8 February 2014
DF Julie Soyer (1985-06-30) June 30, 1985 (age 29) 8 0 France Juvisy v.  Hungary, 20 August 2014
DF Marion Makuch (1992-03-29) March 29, 1992 (age 22) 0 0 France Arras v.  Hungary, 7 May 2014
DF Marine Dafeur (1994-10-20) October 20, 1994 (age 20) 1 0 France Hénin-Beaumont v.  Kazakhstan, 5 Avril 2014
DF Corine Franco-Petit (1983-10-05) October 5, 1983 (age 31) 89 11 France Lyon 2014 Cyprus Cup
MF Camille Abily (1984-12-05) December 5, 1984 (age 30) 138 28 France Lyon v.  Germany, 25 October 2014
MF Sandie Toletti (1995-07-13) July 13, 1995 (age 19) 2 0 France Montpellier v.  Germany, 25 October 2014
MF Viviane Asseyi (1993-11-20) November 20, 1993 (age 21) 7 0 France Montpellier v.  Finland, 17 September 2014
MF Inès Jaurena (1991-05-14) May 14, 1991 (age 23) 0 0 France Juvisy v.  United States, 20 June 2014
MF Camille Catala (1991-05-06) May 6, 1991 (age 23) 23 2 France Juvisy 2014 Cyprus Cup
MF Rose Lavaud (1992-04-06) April 6, 1992 (age 22) 1 0 France St-Étienne v.  Bulgaria, 28 November 2013
FW Pauline Crammer (1991-02-14) February 14, 1991 (age 23) 1 0 Belgium Anderlecht v.  Finland, 17 September 2014
FW Laëtitia Tonazzi (1981-01-31) January 31, 1981 (age 33) 66 15 France Montpellier v.  United States, 14 June 2014

Previous squads[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Most capped French players[edit]

  • Still active national team players in bold.
# Name Career Caps[5] Goals
1 Sandrine Soubeyrand 1997–2013 198 18
2 Sonia Bompastor 2000–2012 156 18
Laura Georges 2001–present 156 6
4 Camille Abily 2001–present 138 28
Élise Bussaglia 2003–present 138 26
6 Louisa Nécib 2005–present 123 32
7 Corinne Diacre 1993–2005 121 14
8 Stéphanie Mugneret-Béghé 1992–2005 115 15
Gaëtane Thiney 2007–present 115 51
10 Marinette Pichon 1994–2008 112 81
Élodie Thomis 2005–present 112 30

Last updated: 8 December 2014

Top France goalscorers[edit]

  • Still active national team players in bold.
# Player Career Goals Caps Average
1 Marinette Pichon 1994–2008 81 112 0.72
2 Marie-Laure Delie 2009–present 57 80 0.71
3 Gaëtane Thiney 2007–present 51 115 0.44
4 Eugénie Le Sommer 2009–present 39 97 0.40
5 Louisa Nécib 2005–present 32 123 0.26
6 Hoda Lattaf 1997–2007 30 109 0.28
Élodie Thomis 2005–present 30 112 0.27
8 Camille Abily 2001–present 28 138 0.20
9 Élise Bussaglia 2003–present 26 138 0.19
10 Sonia Bompastor 2000–2012 18 156 0.12
Sandrine Soubeyrand 1997–2013 18 198 0.10

Last updated: 8 December 2014

Results & Fixtures[edit]

Last updated: 6 December 2014
Source: French Football Federation Women's Results
Source: French Football Federation Women's Schedule

Competitive record[edit]

For single-match results of the women's national team, see French football single-season articles.
*Draws include knockout matches decided by penalty shootout.
**Gold background colour indicates that the tournament was won. Red border colour indicates tournament was held on home soil.

Overall competition record[edit]

Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Top scorer
1984 European Championship qualification
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
1–0 0–3
0–0 2–0
1–1 0–0
Italy Italy
Portugal Portugal
Switzerland Switzerland
2 / 4 Musset
Musset, Wolf
Musset
1987 European Championship qualification
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0–1 3–5
1–3 3–1
0–4 0–1
Netherlands Netherlands
Belgium Belgium
Sweden Sweden
2 / 4 Constantin, Musset, Romagnoli
?
0
Italy 1988 Mundialito
0
1st Stage
0
1–1
1–1
England England
Italy Italy B
2 / 3 Musset
Bernard
Semifinals 0–3 Italy Italy
Third place 0–1 United States United States
1989 European Championship qualification
0
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0
2–0 0–0
5–0 2–0
3–1 0–0
2–2 0–0
Belgium Belgium
Bulgaria Bulgaria
Spain Spain
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
1 / 5 Musset, Puentes
Baracat, Breton, Mismacq, Musset, Puentes
Musset 2, Loisel
Loisel, Romagnoli
Quarterfinals 1–2 0–2 Italy Italy Musset
1991 European Championship qualification
0
1st Stage
0
3–1 2–0
0–2 1–4
Poland Poland
Sweden Sweden
2 / 3 Mismacq 2, Le Boulch, Jézéquel, Musset
Jézéquel
1993 European Championship qualification
0
1st Stage
0
1–4 0–4
1–1 5–1
Denmark Denmark
Finland Finland
2 / 3 Jézéquel
Fusier 2, Bernauer, Cassauba, Locatelli, Petit
1995 European Championship qualification
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0–2 1–1
1–0 3–0
1–0 3–0
Italy Italy
Portugal Portugal
Scotland Scotland
2 / 4 Sykora
Sykora 2, Gout, Richoux
Béghé, Guitti, Hillion, Pichon
1997 European Championship qualification
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
3–3 3–0
0–0 0–1
1–1 2–1
Iceland Iceland
Russia Russia
Netherlands Netherlands
2 / 4 Pichon 4, Sykora + 1 o.g.
0
Gout, Olive, Pichon
Repechage 2–0 3–0 Finland Finland Pichon 2, Diacre, Roujas, Woock
Norway 1997 European Championship
Sweden
0
1st Stage
0
0
1–1
3–1
0–3
Spain Spain
Russia Russia
Sweden Sweden
3 / 4 Roujas
Roujas 3
0
1999 World Cup qualification
0
0
1st Stage (Class A)
0
0
2–1 3–0
2–2 0–1
0–0 2–3
Switzerland Switzerland
Finland Finland
Italy Italy
3 / 4 Lattaf 2, Lagrevol, Roujas + 1 o.g.
Lagrevol, Pichon
Pichon, Soubeyrand
2001 European Championship qualification
0
0
1st Stage (Class A)
0
0
2–2 2–0
1–1 2–1
1–0 2–1
Sweden Sweden
Netherlands Netherlands
Spain Spain
1 / 4 Jézéquel 2, Herbert, Zenoni
Diacre 2, Lattaf
Béghé 2, Diacre
Germany 2001 European Championship
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0–3
3–4
2–0
Norway Norway
Denmark Denmark
Italy Italy
4 / 4 0
Béghé, Blouet, Pichon
Jézéquel, Pichon
2003 World Cup qualification
0
0
1st Stage (Class A)
0
0
0–3 1–3
2–0 2–1
2–1 4–1
Norway Norway
Ukraine Ukraine
Czech Republic Czech Republic
2 / 4 Pichon
Pichon 3, Soubeyrand
Pichon 3, Béghé, Blouin, Soubeyrand
Repechage 1–0 1–0 England England Diacre, Pichon
United States 2003 World Cup
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0–2
1–0
1–1
Norway Norway
South Korea South Korea
Brazil Brazil
3 / 4 0
Pichon
Pichon
2005 European Championship qualification
0
0
0
1st Stage (Class A)
0
0
0
4–0 6–0
2–0 3–0
7–1 5–1
3–0 2–5
Hungary Hungary
Iceland Iceland
Poland Poland
Russia Russia
1 / 5 Pichon 5, Lattaf 2, Béghé, Bompastor, Tonazzi
Lattaf 2, Tonazzi 2, Béghé
Pichon 6, Diacre, Diguelman, Herbert, Lattaf, Tonazzi, Woock
Lattaf 2, Pichon 2, Tonazzi
England 2005 European Championship
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
3–1
1–1
0–3
Italy Italy
Norway Norway
Germany Germany
3 / 4 Pichon 2, Lattaf
Béghé
0
2007 World Cup qualification
0
0
0
1st Stage (Class A)
0
0
0
0–1 2–0
3–1 2–1
2–0 5–0
0–0 1–1
Netherlands Netherlands
Austria Austria
Hungary Hungary
England England
2 / 5 Soubeyrand 2
Bussaglia 2, Soubeyrand 2, Pichon
Pichon 2, Soubeyrand 2, Bompastor, Lattaf, Tonazzi
Diguelman
2009 European Championship qualification
0
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0
6–0 5–0
6–0 2–0
0–1 2–1
8–0 2–0
Greece Greece
Slovenia Slovenia
Iceland Iceland
Serbia Serbia
1 / 5 Abily 3, Soubeyrand 2, Lattaf, Nécib, Franco, Herbert, Thomis
Bussaglia 2, Lattaf 2, Abily, Thiney, Thomis + 1 o.g.
Herbert, Soubeyrand
Brétigny 3, Thomis 2, Abily, Bussaglia, Nécib, Thiney, Traïkia
Finland 2009 European Championship
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
3–1
1–5
1–1
Iceland Iceland
Germany Germany
Norway Norway
3 / 4 Abily, Bompastor, Nécib
Thiney
Abily
Quarterfinals 0–0 (PSO: 4–5) Netherlands Netherlands Penalty scored: 1 Soubeyrand, 2 Abily, 3 Henry, 4 Le Sommer Penalty missed: 5 Franco, 6 Meilleroux, 7 Herbert
2011 World Cup qualification
0
0
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0
0
7–0 3–0
2–0 1–0
12–0 6–0
2–0 7–0
6–0 4–0
Croatia Croatia
Iceland Iceland
Estonia Estonia
Serbia Serbia
Northern Ireland Northern Ireland
1 / 6 Delie 2, Franco 2, Le Sommer 2, Abily, Soubeyrand, Thiney, Thomis
Thiney 2, Thomis
Delie 4, Thiney 4, Herbert 2, Thomis 2, Abily, Bussaglia, Franco, Nécib, Le Sommer + 1 o.g.
Thiney 4, Abily 2, Bussaglia, Delie, Thomis
Bompastor 2, Delie 2, Le Sommer 2, Abily, Franco, Nécib + 1 o.g.
Germany 2011 World Cup
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
1–0
4–0
2–4
Nigeria Nigeria
Canada Canada
Germany Germany
2 / 4 Delie
Thiney 2, Abily, Thomis
Delie, Georges
Quarterfinals 1–1 (PSO: 4–3) England England BussagliaPenalty scored: 2 Bussaglia, 3 Thiney, 4. Bompastor, 5 Le Sommer Penalty missed: 1 Abily
Semifinals 1–3 United States United States Bompastor
Third place 1–2 Sweden Sweden Thomis
United Kingdom 2012 Summer Olympics
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
2–4
5–0
1–0
United States United States
North Korea North Korea
Colombia Colombia
2 / 4 Delie, Thiney
Catala, Delie, Georges, Renard, Thomis
Thomis
Quarterfinals 2–1 Sweden Sweden Georges, Renard
Semifinals 1–2 Japan Japan Le Sommer
Bronze match 0–1 Canada Canada
2013 European Championship qualification
0
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0
5–0 5–0
3–1 4–0
4–1 4–0
2–0 5–0
Israel Israel
Republic of Ireland Ireland
Wales Wales
Scotland Scotland
1 / 5 Thiney 3, Abily, Bompastor, Delie, Franco, Rubio, Le Sommer + 1 o.g.
Le Sommer 3, Delie, Morel, Nécib, Thomis
Thomis 3, Thiney 2, Abily, Delie, Le Sommer
Delie 2, Le Sommer 2, Nécib, Renard + 1 o.g.
Sweden 2013 European Championship
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
3–1
1–0
3–0
Russia Russia
Spain Spain
England England
1 / 4 Delie 2, Le Sommer
Renard
Le Sommer, Necib, Renard
Quarterfinals 1–1 (PSO: 2-4) Denmark Denmark NecibPenalty scored: 2 Thiney, 3 Le Sommer Penalty missed: 1 Necib, 4 Delannoy
2015 World Cup qualification
0
0
0
0
1st Stage
0
0
0
0
4–0 7–0
3–1 3–1
10–0 14–0
4–0 4–0
2–0 3–1
Kazakhstan Kazakhstan
Austria Austria
Bulgaria Bulgaria
Hungary Hungary
Finland Finland
1 / 6 Thiney 4, Delie 3, Abily 2, Delannoy, Thomis
Bussaglia, Delie, Henry, Necib, Renard, Thomis
Thiney 8, Le Sommer 5, Renard 4, Delie 3, Abily, Bussaglia, Georges, Necib
Le Sommer 2, Abily, Delie, Majri, Thiney, Thomis + 1 o.g.
Necib 2, Bussaglia, Delie, Thiney

Coaching staff[edit]

As of 24 October 2014.[6]
Position Name Nationality
Manager Philippe Bergerôo  French
Assistant manager Thierry Asseloos  French
Préparateur physique Frédéric Aubert  French
Goalkeeper coach Sandrine Roux  French
Médecin Fabrice Bryand  French
Kinésithérapeute-ostéopathe Joël Barthe  French
Kinésithérapeute-ostéopathe Marianne Boussely  French
Press Secretary Stéphane Lanoue  French
Coordinateur Administratif et Logistique Filipe Pires  French
Delegation Chief Brigitte Henriques  French
Delegation Chief Albert Gemmrich  French

Media coverage[edit]

France's qualifying matches and friendlies are currently televised by Direct 8.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]