Francis Bathurst Suttor

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Sir Francis Bathurst Suttor (30 April 1839 – 4 April 1915) was an Australian pastoralist, politician, and sheep and horse breeder. [1]

Early life[edit]

Suttor was born in Bathurst, New South Wales, the son of pastoralist William Henry Suttor and his wife, Charlotte Augusta Anne née Francis. Francis Bathurst Suttor was a grandson of George Suttor. F. B. Suttor was educated at The King's School, Parramatta, and from age 19 managed his father's properties near Bathurst. He took up the properties Redbank and Katella near Wellington, New South Wales in 1863, and later Bradwardine at Bathurst.[1] In July 1863 Suttor married Emily Jane (1841–1911), daughter of Thomas Jarman Hawkins (1909-1885) of Walmer, Bathurst.[1] Suttor made a study of sheep-breeding; in 1868 hebought 100 merino ewes from C. C. Cox of Brombee and the use of the sire Brombee Pet for two months; Suttor maintained the high standards of Mudgee sheep.[1] With ewes bought from James Alexander Gibson Suttor founded a stud of Tasmanian merinos at Bradwardine that were successful in shows.[1] From a Cleveland Bay sire, Suttor also bred a superior type of horse for coaches which were extensively used in Australia at the time.[1] [2]

Political career[edit]

On 2 January 1875[3] Suttor was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly as a Free trader for Bathurst in bitter campaign against Edmund Webb.[1] Suttor held the seat until 1900. Suttor was minister for justice and public instruction in the second Henry Parkes ministry from 22 March 1877 to 16 August 1877, and held the same position in the third Parkes ministry from December 1878 to April 1880; he was minister of justice from May to August 1880, then became Postmaster-General until November 1881, when he became minister of public instruction until January 1883. From February 1886 to January 1887 Suttor was Postmaster-General in the Patrick Jennings ministry. Suttor was minister of public instruction in the second George Dibbs ministry from January to March 1889, and held the same post in Dibbs' third ministry from October 1891 to August 1894.[2] In 1894 Suttor represented New South Wales at the Ottawa Colonial Conference. Suttor lost his seat in the February 1889 general elections after intervention by Parkes and Webb;, but was then nominated to the New South Wales Legislative Council by Dibbs[1] from 27 February 1889[3] where he represented the William Lyne and John See ministries. Suttor was vice-president of the executive council from 12 June 1900 until 23 May 1903 when he was appointed president of the Legislative Council, and held this position until his death.[3] On 29 April 1914 the members of the Legislative Council gave a banquet in honour of Suttor's 75th birthday. In replying to the toast of his health Suttor mentioned that his father, uncle, brother and himself had, between them, given over 80 years of service in parliament. Suttor also said that there were then 138 living descendants of his father and mother.[2]

Other Interests[edit]

Suttor was also a trustee of Australian Museum and the Art Gallery of New South Wales and was a member of the senate of the University of Sydney. Suttor was always interested in the primary producer and was president of the New South Wales Sheepbreeders' Association 1903-15,[1] and president of the Royal Agricultural Society of New South Wales. He was an excellent chairman and president of the Legislative Council.[2] Suttor also served as the president of the Australian Club. Suttor died on 4 April 1915 at his Darling Point residence, survived by three sons and five daughters. After a state funeral, Suttor was buried in the Anglican section of South Head cemetery. Suttor was knighted in 1903. A bust of Suttor by Nelson Illingworth is owned by the Legislative Council, Sydney.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Ruth Teale, 'Suttor, Sir Francis Bathurst (1839 - 1915)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 6, MUP, 1976, pp 227-228. Retrieved 9 April 2010
  2. ^ a b c d Serle, Percival (1949). "Suttor, Francis Bathurst". Dictionary of Australian Biography. Sydney: Angus and Robertson. Retrieved 2010-04-09. 
  3. ^ a b c "Sir Francis Bathurst SUTTOR (1839 - 1915)". Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 9 April 2010. 
Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Edward Combes
Member for Bathurst
1875 – 1887
Succeeded by
William Cortis
Preceded by
William Paul
Member for Bathurst
1891 – 1894
Succeeded by
Sydney Smith
Preceded by
Sydney Smith
Member for Bathurst
1898 – 1900
Succeeded by
William Young