Francis Moreau

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Francis Moreau
Francis MOREAU.jpg
Personal information
Full name Francis Moreau
Born (1965-07-21) July 21, 1965 (age 48)
Saint-Quentin, France
Height 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in)
Weight 77 kg (170 lb; 12.1 st)
Team information
Discipline Road & Track
Role Rider
Amateur team(s)
Veloclub Saint-Quentin
Professional team(s)
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993–1996
1997–2000
Fagor-MBK
Histor - Sigma
Tonton Tapis - GB
GB - MG Maglificio
GAN
Cofidis[1]
Infobox last updated on
16 August 2008

Francis Moreau (born 21 July 1965)[2] is a French former professional racing cyclist from Saint-Quentin. He turned professional in 1989 and retired 12 years later at the end of 2000.[3] A pursuit specialist, Moreau was a frequent medalist and the UCI Track Cycling World Championships, winning the pursuit in 1991. He was also part of the gold medal winning team at the 1996 Summer Olympics, who set a new Olympic record with a time of 4:05:930.

On the road, Moreau finished 132nd at the 1991 Tour de France and 113th in 1994 - despite the death of his father on 9 July; his father had said that he would not want his son to drop out in mourning.[4] In 1995 he finished 5th in the Grand Prix de Plumelec-Morbihan and came 9th in the 1996 Paris–Roubaix.

Palmarès[edit]

1987
1st Stage 1, Circuit de la Sarthe
1988
2nd Segré
3rd Amiens - Beaurains, Amateurs, Beaurains
2nd Prix Frequence Nord, Amateurs
1990
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
2nd Chrono des Herbiers
2nd Duo Normand
3rd Stage 3 Tour Méditerranéen, Marignane
1st Stage 1, Paris–Nice, Paris
1991
1st Arc en ciel.svg UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Points Race
1st Barentin
3rd Le Havre
3rd Amiens
1992
2nd Arpajon-sur-Cère (FRA)
1st Stage 3, Critérium International, Avignon
2nd Stage 3b, Tour of Luxembourg, Bettembourg
3rd Stage 4, Tour of Luxembourg, Diekirch
1993
3rd Pursuit, French National Track Championships
2nd Postgirot Open
1st Stage 5, Postgirot Open, Burseryd
3rd General Classification Tour du Poitou-Charentes et de la Vienne
3rd Stage 1 Paris–Nice, Fonteney Sous Bois
2nd Amiens
1st Paris - Brussel
1994
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
2nd Pursuit, French National Track Championships
1st Bordeaux - Cauderan
3rd Stage 4a, Circuit Cycliste de la Sarthe
3rd Stage 2, Étoile de Bessèges, Aigues Mortes
1st Amiens
2nd GP des Nations
1995
1st A Travers le Morbihan
2nd Pursuit, French National Track Championships
1996
1st Gold medal olympic.svg Team pursuit, 1996 Summer Olympics
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Team Pursuit
3rd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
5th Points race, 1996 Summer Olympics
9th 1996 Paris–Roubaix
2nd Lèves
2nd La Côte Picarde (FRA)
2nd Stage 3b, Tour of Luxembourg, Bettembourg
3rd Stage 6, Volta Ciclista a Catalunya, Port Aventura
1997
2nd Stage 4b, Tour du Poitou-Charentes et de la Vienne, Poitiers
1998
1st France Pursuit, French National Track Championships
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Individual Pursuit
2nd Calais
3rd Duo Normand
2nd Six-Days of Grenoble
1999
2nd UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Men's Team Pursuit
2nd Team pursuit, French National Track Championships
1st Mexico City, Team Pursuit; (with Cyril Bos, Philippe Ermenault & Damien Pommereau)
1st Mexico City, Pursuit
2nd Frisco, Team Pursuit, Frisco
2000
1st France Team pursuit, French National Track Championships
4th Team pursuit, 2000 Summer Olympics
1st GP de Lillers

References[edit]

  1. ^ Francis Moreau profile at Cycling Archives
  2. ^ "Olympics at Sports-Reference.com > Athletes > Francis Moreau". 
  3. ^ "Moreau retires". cyclingnews.com. 11 November 2000. 
  4. ^ Samuel Abt (24 July 1994). "CYCLING; Also-Ran Also a Hero By Staying In the Tour". New York Times.