Francis Shackelford

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Francis Shackelford (c1909-1973) was the United States General Counsel of the Army from 1950 to 1952 and Assistant Secretary of the Army (General Management) from 1952 to 1953.

Biography[edit]

Francis Shackelford was educated at Princeton University and Harvard Law School.[1] During World War II, he served as an officer in the United States Navy.[1]

In 1950, President of the United States Harry Truman named Shackelford General Counsel of the Army, with Shackelford holding this office from July 24, 1950 until August 25, 1952.[2] On August 26, 1952, he became Assistant Secretary of the Army (General Management), holding this office until January 20, 1953.[2]

Leaving government service in 1953, Shackelford became general counsel of Magic Chef, a position he would hold until his death twenty years later.[1]

Shackelford was married to the former Renee Marie Fletcher, and was living in Cleveland, Tennessee at the time of his death.[1] After Shackelford underwent open heart surgery in Birmingham, Alabama, doctors were unable to revive him, and he died on November 30, 1973.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Francis Shackelford", New York Times, Dec. 7, 1973.
  2. ^ a b James E. Hewes, Jr., From Root to McNamara: Army Organization and Administration (1975), pp. 381-382.
  3. ^ "Francis Shackelford, Truman Army Official", Washington Post, Dec. 2, 1973.
Government offices
Preceded by
Karl Bendetsen
General Counsel of the Army
July 24, 1950 – August 25, 1952
Succeeded by
Bernard A. Monaghan
Preceded by
Karl Bendetsen
Assistant Secretary of the Army (General Management)
August 26, 1952 – January 20, 1953
Succeeded by
Office Abolished