Francisco Ramón Vicuña

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Francisco Ramón Vicuña
Fcoramonvicuna.jpg
President of Chile
In office
2 November 1829 – 7 December 1829
Preceded by Francisco Antonio Pinto
Succeeded by Francisco Ruiz-Tagle
In office
16 July 1829 – 19 October 1829
Preceded by Francisco Antonio Pinto
Succeeded by Francisco Antonio Pinto
Personal details
Born 9 September 1775
Santiago, Chile
Died 13 January 1849
Santiago, Chile
Political party Liberal Party
Spouse(s) Mariana de Aguirre

Francisco Ramón de Vicuña Larraín (September 9, 1775 - January 13, 1849) was a Chilean political figure. He served twice as acting President of Chile in 1829. Francisco Vicuña was of Basque descent.[1]

Early life[edit]

He was born in Santiago on 1775, the son of Francisco de Vicuña Hidalgo y Zavala and of María del Carmen Larraín Salas y Vicuña. He married Mariana de Aguirre, and had 11 children with her.

In 1810, Vicuña participated in Chile's war for independence and organized the first firearms production in the country. In 1811, he represented Osorno in the congress, which was to give Chile a constitution, in 1814, he moved to the Senate of Chile. Then, he was arrested for conspiracy against the Spanish crown and banished into exile. Only after Chile's victory at the battle of Chacabuco in 1817, was he able to return to his home land. Bernardo O'Higgins appointed him as a government representative to the northern provinces.

Political life[edit]

In 1823 he became the head of the administration of Santiago and then as a delegate to the constitutional convention that year. He was one of the main defenders of the Federalist position championed by José Miguel Infante. In 1825 the Supreme Director of Chile Ramón Freire appointed him to be his deputy as well as foreign and interior minister and at times acting war, naval, and finance minister.

In 1829, when Francisco Antonio Pinto was elected President of Chile, the runner-ups where Francisco Ruiz-Tagle, a liberal federalist, and José Joaquín Prieto, a conservative centralist, who both received the same amount of votes. Nonetheless, congress, the majority of which was liberal, declared Joaquín Vicuña, a distant third and brother of Francisco Ramón (who was president of the senate) Vice-President. The centralists outraged decided for armed resistance and the Chilean Civil War of 1829 broke out.

In the ensuing civil war between the conservative centralists and the liberal federalists, Pinto was forced twice to leave the post of president to Vicuña. First, from July 14 to October 19, when Vicuña assumed as President Delegate, and then finally when he resigned on November 2 and Vicuña assumed power. On December 7, 1829 the conservative troops under José Joaquín Prieto approached Santiago from the South. The government under Vicuña fled northward to Coquimbo, where they were, however, imprisoned by the victorious conservative troops. Then, Chile was without a leader for a few weeks (from December 7 to 24, 1829) until a Government Junta was organized and took control under José Tomás Ovalle.

Under the centralist governments of José Joaquín Prieto and Manuel Bulnes, the liberal Vicuña could not hold any governmental positions. He died in Santiago on January 13, 1849.

Cabinet[edit]

The Vicuña Cabinet
Office Name Term
President Francisco Ramón Vicuña 16 July 1829–7 December 1829
Minister of Government & Foreign Affairs Melchor José Ramos 16 July 1829–9 November 1829
José Nicolás de la Cerda 9 November 1829–7 December 1829
Secretary of War José Santiago Muñoz 16 July 1829–9 November 1829
José Antonio Pérez de Cotapos 9 November 1829–7 December 1829
Secretary of Navy José Manuel Calderón 16 July 1829–7 December 1829
Minister of Finance Manuel José Huici 16 July 1829–9 November 1829
Pedro José Prado 9 November 1829–7 December 1829

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

This article incorporates information from the German Wikipedia.
Political offices
Preceded by
José María Vásquez de Novoa
President of the Senate of Chile
1829
Succeeded by
Fernando Errázuriz
Preceded by
Francisco Antonio Pinto
President Delegate of Chile
1829
Succeeded by
Francisco Antonio Pinto
Preceded by
Francisco Antonio Pinto
President of Chile
1829
Succeeded by
José Tomás Ovalle
Government offices
Preceded by
Francisco Antonio Pinto
Minister of War and Navy
1825
Succeeded by
José María Vásquez de Novoa
Preceded by
Francisco Antonio Pinto
Minister of Government
and Foreign Affairs

1825-1826
Succeeded by
Juan de Dios Vial