Frank Foyston

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Frank Foyston
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1958
Frank Foyston.jpg
Born (1891-02-02)February 2, 1891
Minesing, ON, CAN
Died January 19, 1966(1966-01-19) (aged 74)
Seattle, WA, USA
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 158 lb (72 kg; 11 st 4 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Left
Played for Detroit Olympics
Detroit Cougars
Victoria Cougars
Seattle Metropolitans
Toronto Blueshirts
Playing career 1912–1930

Frank Corbett "The Flash" Foyston (February 2, 1891 – January 19, 1966) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player and coach. Foyston was a member of Stanley Cup championship teams with the Toronto Blueshirts in 1914, the Seattle Metropolitans in 1917, and the Victoria Cougars in 1925. While with the Metropolitans, he twice led the Pacific Coast Hockey Association in goals. After his retirement from playing, Foyston became a minor league head coach. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1958.

Early career[edit]

Foyston was born in Minesing, Ontario, in 1891.[1] From 1908 to 1910, he played for the Barrie Athletic Club in the OHA Jr. league. In 1908–09, he scored 17 goals in 6 games. In 1910–11, Foyston played for the Barrie Athletic Club in the OHA Sr. league and scored 14 goals in 6 games. The following season, he played for the Toronto Eaton's, scoring 15 goals in 6 games in the regular season and 5 goals in 4 games in the playoffs.[2]

Toronto Blueshirts[edit]

Foyston began his professional hockey career with the National Hockey Association's Toronto Blueshirts in 1912–13. In his first season with Toronto, he scored 8 goals in 16 games. The following year, he scored 16 goals in 19 regular season games and 1 goal in 2 playoff games to help the Blueshirts win the NHA championship. In the 1914 Stanley Cup Finals against the PCHA's Victoria Cougars, Foyston scored two goals, including the series-clincher for Toronto. The following season, he had 13 goals and 9 assists in 20 games.[2][3]

Seattle Metropolitans[edit]

At the beginning of the 1915–16 season, Foyston signed with the PCHA's Seattle Metropolitans, where he would play for nine seasons, leading the league in goals twice. In his first season with Seattle, he had 13 points in 18 games. The following season, he had 36 goals and 12 assists in 24 games. Seattle played in the 1917 Stanley Cup Finals against the Montreal Canadiens, and Foyston had 7 goals and 3 assists to help the Metropolitans win the Stanley Cup in four games. It was the first time an American team had won the Cup.[2][3] At the end of the season, Foyston was voted the "Champion All-Around Hockey Player" in the PCHA.[4]

In 1918–19, Foyston scored 15 goals in 18 regular season games and 3 goals in 2 playoff games, as Seattle advanced to the 1919 Stanley Cup Finals against the Canadiens. Foyston scored 9 goals in 5 games before the series was abandoned due to the influenza epidemic. The Stanley Cup was not awarded that year. The following season, in 1919–20, Foyston scored 26 goals in 22 regular season games and 3 goals in 2 playoff games, as Seattle advanced to the 1920 Stanley Cup Finals. In the Finals, he had 6 goals in 5 games.[2][3]

Victoria and Detroit[edit]

Foyston played with Seattle until 1924. After the franchise folded, he signed with Victoria Cougars of the Western Canada Hockey League. In 1924–25, he had 11 points in 27 regular season games and 2 points in 4 playoff games. In the 1925 Stanley Cup Finals against the Canadiens, he scored 1 goal in 4 games to help the Cougars become the last non-NHL team to win the Cup. He played in the 1926 Stanley Cup Finals the following year but had no points. The Victoria franchise was purchased by the National Hockey League's Detroit Cougars, and Foyston played for the team during the next two seasons.[2][3]

Coaching career[edit]

In 1928–29, Foyston was a player-coach for the Detroit Olympics of the Canadian Professional Hockey League. He had 24 points in 42 regular season games and led the team to a 27-10-5 record. His playing career ended after the season. In 1930–31, he coached the Syracuse Stars, and in 1931–32, he coached the Bronx Tigers. Foyston then coached the Seattle Seahawks of the North West Hockey League for the next few years. In 1934–35, he led the Seahawks to a 20-9-3 record and a first place finish, but the team lost in the playoffs.[2][3][5][6]

Legacy[edit]

Foyston is one of nine players who have won Stanley Cups with three different franchises.[7] He was capable of playing well at center, left wing, and right wing, and rover, and in 1958, he was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame.[3]

Foyston died in Seattle, Washington, in 1966.[1]

Statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1908–09 Barrie Athletic Club OHA-Jr. 6 17 0 17 9
1909–10 Barrie Athletic Club OHA-Jr.
1910–11 Barrie Athletic Club OHA-Jr. 6 14 0 14
1911–12 Toronto Eaton's TMHL 6 15 0 15 4 5 0 5 9
1912–13 Toronto Blueshirts NHA 16 8 0 8 8
1913–14 Toronto Blueshirts NHA 19 16 2 18 8 2 1 0 1 0
1913–14 Toronto Blueshirts St-Cup 3 2 0 2 3
1914–15 Toronto Blueshirts NHA 20 13 9 22 11
1915–16 Toronto Blueshirts NHA 1 0 0 0 0
1915–16 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 18 9 4 13 6
1916–17 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 24 36 12 48 51
1916–17 Seattle Metropolitans St-Cup 4 7 3 10 3
1917–18 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 13 9 5 14 9 2 0 0 0 3
1918–19 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 18 15 4 19 0 2 3 0 3 0
1918–19 Seattle Metropolitans St-Cup 5 9 1 10 0
1919–20 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 22 26 3 29 3 2 3 1 4 0
1919–20 Seattle Metropolitans St-Cup 5 6 1 7 7
1920–21 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 23 26 4 30 10 2 1 0 1 0
1921–22 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 24 16 7 23 25 2 0 0 0 3
1922–23 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 30 20 8 28 21
1923–24 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 30 17 6 23 8 2 1 0 1 3
1924–25 Victoria Cougars WCHL 27 6 5 11 6 4 1 1 2 2
1924–25 Victoria Cougars St-Cup 4 1 0 1 0
1925–26 Victoria Cougars WHL 12 6 3 9 8 3 2 0 2 4
1925–26 Victoria Cougars St-Cup 4 0 0 0 2
1926–27 Detroit Cougars NHL 41 10 5 15 16
1927–28 Detroit Olympics Can-Pro 19 3 2 5 14
1927–28 Detroit Cougars NHL 23 7 2 9 16
1928–29 Detroit Olympics Can-Pro 42 18 6 24 20 7 0 0 0 9
1929–30 Detroit Olympics IHL 31 2 1 3 6 3 0 0 0 0
NHA totals 56 37 11 48 27 2 1 0 1 0
PCHA totals 202 174 53 227 133 12 8 1 9 6
St-Cup totals 25 25 5 30 15

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Blevins, Dave (2011). The Sports Hall of Fame Encyclopedia. Scarecrow Press. p. 319.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Frank Foyston Statistics". legendsofhockey.net. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Frank Foyston Biography". legendsofhockey.net. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  4. ^ Bowlsby, Craig H. "Hockey: Seattle's forgotten pro superstar, Frank Foyston". seattletimes.com. May 2, 2013. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  5. ^ "Frank Foyston". hockeydb.com. Retrieved February 25, 2014.
  6. ^ "Foyston Again Back in Seattle Saddle". The Spokesman-Review. December 17, 1935.
  7. ^ "Stanley Cup Playoffs". nhl.com. Retrieved February 25, 2014.

External links[edit]