Frank Lovece

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Frank Lovece
10.11.14FrankLoveceByLuigiNovi.jpg
Lovece at the 2014 New York Comic Con
Born Buenos Aires, Argentina
Nationality American
Area(s) Writer
Notable works
Hailing Taxi: The Official Book of the Show
Lost and Found
Atomic Age
Hokum & Hex
Nightstalkers

Frank Lovece is an American journalist and author, and a comic book writer primarily for Marvel Comics, where he and artist Mike Okamoto created the mini-series Atomic Age. He was additionally one of the first professional Web journalists, becoming an editor of a Silicon Alley start-up in 1996. His longest affiliation has been with the New York metropolitan area newspaper Newsday, where he serves as a feature writer and film critic.

For an Entertainment Weekly article on direct-to-video movies representing themselves as theatrical releases, he produced the first — and, after the article's publication, only — home video to obtain an MPAA rating.

Early life and career[edit]

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the son of Italian immigrants, Frank Lovece moved to the U.S. as a toddler and was raised in Keyser and Morgantown, West Virginia.[1] There his family ran Italian restaurants.[2] He attended St. Francis High School and West Virginia University in Morgantown,[1] graduating with a bachelor of arts degree in communication. He was the arts/entertainment editor of the college newspaper, the Daily Athenaeum; held posts in student government; and interned with both the WWVU statewide radio news service, and, in Washington, D.C., the USDA Cooperative Extension Service.[3]

He became a stringer for the New York City / Long Island newspaper Newsday in the late 1980s, producing feature articles and movie reviews, and becoming a weekly TV columnist there in 2003.[3] Lovece's book Hailing Taxi: The Official Book of the Show, was published in 1988, the first of several books he would write on topics including the TV series The Brady Bunch and The X-Files, and on the Godzilla movie series.

By the 1990s, Lovece was a weekly syndicated columnist for United Media / NEA, and a writer for periodicals including the Los Angeles Times, the New York Post, Penthouse, Billboard, and Entertainment Weekly, where he wrote features and reviewed home video releases and comic books.[4] For an Entertainment Weekly article on direct-to-video movies representing themselves as theatrical releases, he produced the first – and, after the article's publication, only – home video to obtain an MPAA rating.[5]

Comic books[edit]

Lovece (right) with Stan Lee, signing autographs together at the 1993 Comic-Con International San Diego.

Lovece and artist Mike Okamoto created the four-issue miniseries Atomic Age (Nov. 1990 – Feb. 1991) for Marvel Comics' creator-owned Epic Comics imprint. The series was among the items featured in the Bowling Green State University exhibition "The Atomic Age Opens: Selections from the Popular Culture Library".[6] Collaborator Al Williamson won the 1991 Eisner Award for Best Inker for his work on that and other series that awards-year, with Okamoto winning The Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award.

Lovece went on to write stories for Epic's anthology series Clive Barker's Hellraiser, and wrote the nine-issue run of Hokum & Hex for Marvel's Razorline imprint, created by novelist Barker.[7] Other work includes such children's comics as the licensed series Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (including one story penciled by Spider-Man co-creator Steve Ditko), VR Troopers and Masked Rider.[8] The Hellraiser story "For My Son", by Lovece and artist Bill Koeb, originally published in Clive Barker's Hellraiser Summer Special No. 1 (Summer 1992),[8] appears in Checker Publishing's Clive Barker's Hellraiser: Collected Best, Volume 1 (ISBN 0-9710249-2-8), though with the last page inexplicably missing; the complete story appears in an authorized online version from web publisher Wowio.[9]

Also for Marvel, Lovece wrote for the series Nightstalkers and for The Incredible Hulk and Ghost Rider annuals,[8] as well as an inventory story for Alpha Flight; he additionally wrote a Vampirella inventory story for Harris Comics.[3] His three-part child-abuse drama "Egg" ran in Dark Horse Comics' Dark Horse Presents #110–112, where editor Bob Schreck opined, "Frank is probably the most under-exploited, most sensitive writer this field has to offer".[10] Lovece also wrote an educational comic book about the American banking system for the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.[3]

Later career[edit]

Lost and Found (2006), by Lovece and photographer Matthew Jordan Smith

Beginning in 1996, he served as a Web editor and streaming video producer at the Silicon Alley startup Gist TV (Gist.com). He later became a Web editor at Hachette Filipacchi, creating sites for Sound & Vision and Popular Photography magazines, and, from 2001 to 2004, at the Sci-Fi Channel television network, creating sites for Battlestar Galactica, Stargate SG-1, Stargate Atlantis, The X-Files, The Incredible Hulk, Legend of Earthsea and other television shows, movies and miniseries. In 2002, he began a longtime association with Habitat magazine, writing about New York City real estate.[11]

In 2005, Lovece and photographer Matthew Jordan Smith collaborated on the book Lost and Found, a photojournalistic record of families of abducted children and the work of The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.[12][13]

Lovece in addition to his Newsday column, features and film reviews,[14] has been a movie critic for Film Journal International,[15] the TV Guide website[14] and the northern New Jersey newspaper The Record.[16]

Humor[edit]

From 2001–2003, Lovece was a member of the New York City improv comedy troupe Wingnuts. His humor writing has appeared in Entertainment Weekly, Newsday, Yahoo!/MSN, and elsewhere.[3]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Abrams, Nancy (September 10, 1989). "Frank Lovece Makes a Living Writing About TV". The Dominion Post (Morgantown, West Virginia). Archived from the original on July 5, 2013. Retrieved July 5, 2013. 
  2. ^ Seitz, Matt Zoller (October 4, 1996). "Declassified Information, By the Book". The Star-Ledger (Newark, New Jersey). Archived from the original on July 5, 2013. Retrieved July 5, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "FrankLovece.com". (Official site). Archived from the original on July 17, 2012.  Additional WebCitation archive, November 23, 2010.
  4. ^ "Frank Lovece". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on July 22, 2010. 
  5. ^ The Washington Post, August 9, 1991: Style section, p. D6
  6. ^ "The Atomic Age Opens: Selections from the Browne Library". Browne Popular Culture Library News. May 31, 1995. Archived from the original on June 10, 2010. 
  7. ^ "Comics". CliveBarker.com. Archived from the original on December 31, 2010. 
  8. ^ a b c Frank Lovece at the Grand Comics Database
  9. ^ "Hellraiser Collection 06". Wowio.com. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. 
  10. ^ Schreck, Bob. Dark Horse Presents No. 110 (June 1996), p. 9
  11. ^ Frank Lovece at Habitat
  12. ^ Lovece, Frank (2006, n.d.). "Behind the Scenes of Lost and Found". TakeGreatPictures.com. Archived from the original on November 23, 2010.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  13. ^ "Lost and Found". National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. 2006, n.d. Archived from the original on November 23, 2010.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  14. ^ a b Frank Lovece at Rotten Tomatoes
  15. ^ Frank Lovece at Film Journal International
  16. ^ Lovece, Frank (June 1, 1990). "'Recall': In Space, No One Can Hear You Grunt". (Total Recall film review) The Record.  "'Rainman' Takes a Snooze". (Awakenings film review) The Record. December 22, 1990. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]