Frank Maloy Anderson

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Frank Maloy Anderson (Feb. 3, 1871 - Apr. 26, 1961) was an author, historian and professor of history. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska and spent most of his adult life teaching and writing about American and Western European history. He was a prolific writer for the The American Historical Review and is noted among American Civil War historians for his book The Diary of a Public Man.

Life[edit]

He taught history at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis from 1895-1896. The following year he attended Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts from 1896-1897. He married his first wife Mary G. Steele in 1898, who died in 1938. Their marriage produced one son, Troyer Steele Anderson, (1900 - 1948).[1]

Maloy taught history at Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H. from 1914-1941. He became a member and was Executive Council of the American Association of University Professors from 1917-1920. He was a member and eventual Executive Council of the American Historical Association from 1926-1928. In 1944 he married his second wife, Mary Maud Case.[2]

In 1948 Anderson published Mystery of a "Public Man," a historical detective story regarding quotes made in a diary, known as The Diary of a Public Man, first published in a popular magazine in 1879, quoting people closely associated with Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas and William H. Seward just before the Civil War broke out. The diary's publisher for reasons that are still disputed concealed the identity of its author and has been the center of much debate and controversy regarding the conclusions and surrounding history.[3]

Frank Maloy Anderson died in Saint Paul, Minnesota, on April 26, 1961, at the age of 90, and is buried at Lakewood Cemetery in Minnesota.[1]

Works[edit]

Sources[edit]

  • Anderson, Frank Maloy (1948). The Mystery of "a Public Man,": A Historical Detective Story. University of Minnesota Press, 1256 pages. 
  • The Diary of a Public Man. Unpublished Passages of the Secret History of the American Civil War. The North American Review, page range 125-140. 1879. , E'book

Further reading[edit]

  • Crofts, Daniel W. (2010). A Secession Crisis Enigma: William Henry Hurlbert and the Diary of a Public Man. LSU Press, 305 pages. , Book

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Find a Grave
  2. ^ Google Analytic, Frank Maloy Anderson
  3. ^ Andrson, 1948 -- see also Kathryn Allamong Jacob, King of the Lobby: The Life and Times of Sam Ward, Man-About-Washington in the Gilded Age (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2009).