Frank Steglich

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Frank Steglich (born 1941) is a German physicist.

He received the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in 1986 and a number of other recognitions. He is the founding director of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Germany and is currently also Vice President of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation).

Frank Steglich discovered the first heavy fermion superconductor, CeCu2Si2, while working as a postdoctoral student in Cologne, Germany in 1978.[1] CeCu2Si2 is the first metallic system to be discovered in which the superconductivity is driven by electron-electron interactions, rather than the electron-phonon interaction that is responsible for conventional BCS superconductivity. The discovery of this material revolutionized research into superconductivity, establishing the reality of electronically mediated superconductivity and foreshadowing the discovery of a wide range of heavy electron superconductors, and the subsequent discovery of electronically mediated pairing in cuprate high temperature superconductors. The first published report of the phenomenon occurred in 1979,[2] by which time Steglich had taken up a junior faculty position at the University of Darmstadt, and confirmed the existence of bulk superconductivity through the measurement of the specific heat anomaly at the transition temperature of Tc=0.5K.

He won the Gay-Lussac-Humboldt-Prize in 1989.

References[edit]

  1. ^ F. Steglich (2005). "Twenty-five years of heavy-fermion superconductivity". Physica B: Condensed Matter. 359-361: 326–332. Bibcode:2005PhyB..359..326S. doi:10.1016/j.physb.2005.01.054. 
  2. ^ F. Steglich, J. Aarts, C. D. Bredl, W. Lieke, D. Meschede, W. Franz, and H. Schäfer (1979). "Superconductivity in the Presence of Strong Pauli Paramagnetism: CeCu2Si2". Physical Review Letters 43 (25): 1892. Bibcode:1979PhRvL..43.1892S. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.43.1892. 

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