Frank T. Caprio

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Frank T. Caprio
Frank Caprio.JPG
General Treasurer of Rhode Island
In office
2007–2011
Succeeded by Gina Raimondo
Member of the Rhode Island Senate
from the 8th district
In office
1994–2006
Member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives
from the 14th district
In office
1990–1994
Personal details
Born (1966-05-10) May 10, 1966 (age 48)
Providence, Rhode Island
Nationality American
Political party Democrat
Spouse(s) Gabriella Caprio
Children Frank II
Ashley
Residence Providence, Rhode Island
Alma mater Harvard University (S.B.)
Suffolk University Law School (J.D.)
Profession Private Equity
Investments
Religion Roman Catholic

Frank T. Caprio (born May 10, 1966) is a candidate for Rhode Island General Treasurer in 2014,[1] he also is a Managing Director at Chatham Capital a mezzanine finance firm with offices in Atlanta, Dallas and Providence. He had a twenty-year political career which included being elected as the General Treasurer of Rhode Island. He was the first political candidate in the United States to use on-demand television to reach voters and one of the first candidates to launch an Internet TV channel for use in a political campaign in 2006.

Caprio was the Democratic Party nominee in the 2010 Rhode Island gubernatorial election. The race was won by now Governor, Lincoln Chafee who won with 36 percent of the vote.

Education and early career[edit]

Frank T. Caprio is the eldest child of Joyce and Judge Frank Caprio, and he is the brother of Rhode Island State Representative David Caprio. He attended public schools in Narragansett, Rhode Island, and graduated from Bishop Hendricken High School in 1984. He earned a degree in economics from Harvard University in 1988. While at Harvard, Caprio was captain of the Harvard baseball team. He was an All-Eastern League outfielder in 1988,[2] and an All-Ivy League defensive back on the championship Harvard football team in 1987.[3] He played against Roger Clemens in a 1987 exhibition game[4] and was scouted by Boston Red Sox legend Ted Williams. Caprio earned a J.D. at Suffolk University Law School in 1991 and passed the bar exams in Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

As a lawyer, Caprio focused on corporate, tax, and finance issues. He worked as an in-house counsel at Cookson Group plc, a publicly traded company on the London Stock Exchange.

Early career[edit]

Caprio began his political career while a senior at Harvard, when he was 21 years old. He was elected a delegate from Rhode Island’s Congressional District 2 and attended the 1988 Democratic National Convention in Atlanta. In 1990, while still attending law school, Caprio was elected to the Rhode Island House of Representatives for District 14 (Providence). He served two terms as a state representative, traveling by train between classes in Boston each morning and legislative sessions in Providence each afternoon.

Following those two terms, Caprio spent the next 12 years serving in the Rhode Island Senate, where he chaired the Senate Finance Committee in 2001–2002. In this position, Caprio saved an annual $5 million affordable housing program from being cut by the governor in 2001.[citation needed] He then proposed and implemented a plan to expand the $5 million to $10 million through an affordable housing bond. In 2006, he co-sponsored a bill to increase the annual $10 million bond to a $50 million affordable housing fund. The housing fund was approved by voters in 2006.

Caprio also led the debate on phasing out Rhode Island's capital gains tax, which would allow Rhode Islanders to have the nation’s lowest tax rate on their stock and real estate profits. This tax change became law in 2007. He was removed from his chairmanship by Senate leadership in 2002 as a result of his outspoken advocacy of the Separation of Powers amendment. After some of the Senate leaders were removed from office in 2003, the amendment passed the legislature and became law after a statewide vote. In 2004, Caprio was named chair of the Senate Commerce, Housing, and Municipal Government Committee.

Political career[edit]

General Treasurer of Rhode Island[edit]

Campaign[edit]

On November 7, 2006, Caprio, the endorsed candidate of the Democratic Party, was elected General Treasurer of Rhode Island, receiving 73% of the vote. He won by a larger margin than any candidate for a contested statewide office on the Rhode Island ballot in 2006.[5]

Caprio made Rhode Island history as the first candidate in the state to officially announce his candidacy via a multimedia broadcast that included television, Web, on-demand cable television, and radio. This was done, he explained, because he wants his "vision for the treasurer’s office" to be accessible to "as many Rhode Islanders as possible in as comfortable a format as possible." [6]

Caprio was the first political candidate in the United States to use On-Demand Television in a campaign.[7] His television documentary, Caprio, the Biography, was available for free viewing throughout Rhode Island via Cox Communications's On-Demand program. He also launched one of the nation's first campaign internet TV channels.[8] Both the website and his television ads garnered awards.[9][10]

Investments and the 2008 market crisis[edit]

Months before the subprime mortgage crisis began to take a toll on banks, financial services companies and public pension funds, Caprio began to minimize the State’s exposure to asset backed securities. Steps included conducting a competitive bidding process that expanded the number of qualified investment banks underwriting the State's bond transactions, and minimizing the State’s exposure to companies such as Bear Stearns.[11]

As part of his effort to ensure the health of Rhode Island’s pension system, Caprio moved $1 billion from Quality D money market funds (with loose terms that could have allowed for investment in CDOs and SIVs) into Quality A institutional money market funds. This occurred before the subprime crisis began to shake financial markets. At the same time, Caprio moved approximately $150 million in high-yield investments into safe Treasury bonds, before the high yield market began to decline. Rhode Island’s pension fund has maintained its five-year average on investment returns in spite of the current economic turmoil.[12]

Caprio’s approach to assessing and managing risk has helped ensure that the public funds managed by his office avoid the investment losses now plaguing other states.[11] During Caprio's term the Rhode Island State Pension fund outperformed the States of Massachusetts and California State Pension funds as well as the Harvard endowment. In the midst of the 2008 market collapse, Caprio established a financial “SWAT team” of Rhode Island’s top financial minds to ensure the State’s protection from AIG’s collapse.[12] For the fiscal year 2010 a national study was done by the Maryland Public Policy Institute which found that Rhode Island’s pension plan under Frank Caprio paid some of the lowest fees to outside money managers when compared to the other 49 states.[13]

Rhode Island gubernatorial election[edit]

In 2010, Caprio was the Democratic nominee for the Rhode Island gubernatorial election. He ran on the platform of advancing small business.[14] After learning that President Barack Obama would not endorse him in the election, Caprio said that Obama could "take his endorsement and really shove it."[15] The Huffington Post suggested that Obama did not endorse Caprio out of respect for Lincoln Chafee, the Independent nominee who had endorsed Obama in 2008.[15]

Rhode Island General Treasurer 2014[edit]

In May 2013, Caprio announced his intention to regain the Rhode Island General Treasurer's post in the 2014 election.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Frank Caprio for Treasurer http://frankcaprio.com/
  2. ^ Ivy League Baseball
  3. ^ Ivy League Sports
  4. ^ Dan Shaughnessy, "Clemens' return is 10-K gold: He no-hits Harvard for six innings," The Boston Globe, April 5, 1987. http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/Archives?p_product=BG&p_theme=bg&p_action=search&p_maxdocs=200&p_topdoc=1&p_text_direct-0=0EADEDE4B0B2695F&p_field_direct-0=document_id&p_perpage=10&p_sort=YMD_date:D&s_trackval=GooglePM
  5. ^ "Rhode Island Board of Elections." Rhode Island Board of Elections. 8 Nov. 2006. 9 Oct. 2008 <http://new.cityofnewport.com>.
  6. ^ Scott MacKay, "Caprio’s bid for treasurer to begin in high-tech style," The Providence Journal, June 18, 2006. http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/projo/results.html?QryTxt=Caprios+bid+for+treasurer
  7. ^ Stewart Schley, “Politics on Demand,” Broadcasting and Cable, May 1, 2006. http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/CA6329696.html?display=Special+Report
  8. ^ Yahoo Finance, Marketwire, "TV Worldwide Teams With Rhode Island Candidate to Launch Nation's First Campaign Internet TV Channel, October 4, 2006. http://nd.marketwire.com/news/showcache.do?itemid=6214106
  9. ^ RI Future, www.rifuture.org
  10. ^ American Association of Political Consultants, Pollie Awards, Sonoma, CA, March 25, 2006.
  11. ^ a b Perry, Jack (15 Sep 2008). "Caprio: Steps taken to protect R.I. from banks' turmoil". The Providence Journal. 
  12. ^ a b Peoples, Steve; Gregg, Katherine (17 September 2008). "R.I. forms ‘swat team’ to protect $130 million with AIG". The Providence Journal. 
  13. ^ http://www.mdpolicy.org/docLib/20120803_MarylandPolicyReport201204.pdf
  14. ^ "For governor: Frank T. Caprio". Providence Business News. Retrieved 15 May 2012. 
  15. ^ a b Smith, Michelle (25 October 2011). "Frank Caprio: Obama Can 'Shove It'". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 15 May 2012. 
  16. ^ Fitzpatrick, Edward (8 May 2013). "Frank Caprio aims for a comeback". The Providence Journal. Retrieved 8 August 2013. 

External links[edit]