Franklin County, Indiana

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Franklin County, Indiana
Map of Indiana highlighting Franklin County
Location in the state of Indiana
Map of the United States highlighting Indiana
Indiana's location in the U.S.
Founded 1811
Named for Benjamin Franklin
Seat Brookville
Largest town Brookville
Area
 • Total 391.05 sq mi (1,013 km2)
 • Land 384.43 sq mi (996 km2)
 • Water 6.62 sq mi (17 km2), 1.69%
Population
 • (2010) 23,087
 • Density 60/sq mi (23.09/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.franklincountyin.com
Footnotes: Indiana county number 24

Franklin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. As of 2010, the population was 23,087.[1] The county seat is Brookville.[2]

Franklin County is part of Greater Cincinnati.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2010 census, the county has a total area of 391.05 square miles (1,012.8 km2), of which 384.43 square miles (995.7 km2) (or 98.31%) is land and 6.62 square miles (17.1 km2) (or 1.69%) is water.[3]

Brookville from the northeast.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

History[edit]

Franklin County was formed in 1811. It was named for Benjamin Franklin.[4][5]

Some of the early settlers of this county were Primitive Baptists, they came with Elder William Tyner who came from Virginia in 1797. They organized the Little Cedar Grove Baptist Church, the first church in the Whitewater Valley. [1] The members built a log church as early as 1805, about two or three miles southeast of Brookville, Indiana. In 1812 they built a large brick church, with balcony, and rifle ports. They held the first meeting in it on August 1, 1812. It is the oldest church building standing on its original site in Indiana. It is open as a historic site.[6]

One further landmark in the county is the Big Cedar Baptist Church and Burying Ground on Big Cedar Creek Road, between the road to Reily and the Oxford Pike. The original church was established in 1817, as an arm of the Little Cedar Baptist church. The plain, simple brick building, but impressive in its simplicity was built in 1838. This church, like all, or nearly all of the pioneer Baptist groups in the county was originally Primitive Baptist or Hardshell. In the 1830s modernism came upon the scene, modernism and human inventions, like Sunday Schools, Missionary Societies, and organs. Organs were particularly anathema to the Primitive Party; an organ was Arron’s golden calf. The Big Cedar congregation divided into two congregations, but the two groups arrived at an amicable settlement and both congregations continued to use the same building. The Primitives, or Hardshells, had church there on the first and third Sabbath of each month, and the Modernists or Missionary Baptists used the church on the second and fourth Sundays. Each congregation had its own wood shed. The building is now maintained in connection with the Big Cedar Cemetery Association.[2]

Governors James B. Ray, Noah Noble and David Wallace were known as the "Brookville Triumvirate," in that they all had lived in Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana and served consecutive terms in the office of Governor of Indiana. Noble and former governor Ray were political enemies.[3]

James B. Goudie Jr. Speaker of the Indiana House was from Franklin County.

Climate and weather[edit]

Brookville, Indiana
Climate chart (explanation)
J F M A M J J A S O N D
 
 
3
 
36
17
 
 
2.7
 
42
20
 
 
3.8
 
53
29
 
 
4
 
64
38
 
 
4.9
 
74
48
 
 
4.1
 
83
58
 
 
4.3
 
87
62
 
 
3.9
 
85
60
 
 
2.7
 
79
52
 
 
3
 
67
40
 
 
3.7
 
53
32
 
 
3.3
 
41
23
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[7]

In recent years, average temperatures in Brookville have ranged from a low of 17 °F (−8 °C) in January to a high of 87 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −31 °F (−35 °C) was recorded in January 1994 and a record high of 104 °F (40 °C) was recorded in September 1951. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.68 inches (68 mm) in September to 4.90 inches (124 mm) in May.[7]

Government[edit]

The county government is a constitutional body, and is granted specific powers by the Constitution of Indiana, and by the Indiana Code.

County Council: The county council is the legislative branch of the county government and controls all the spending and revenue collection in the county. Representatives are elected from county districts. The council members serve four-year terms. They are responsible for setting salaries, the annual budget, and special spending. The council also has limited authority to impose local taxes, in the form of an income and property tax that is subject to state level approval, excise taxes, and service taxes.[8][9]

Board of Commissioners: The executive body of the county is made of a board of commissioners. The commissioners are elected county-wide, in staggered terms, and each serves a four-year term. One of the commissioners, typically the most senior, serves as president. The commissioners are charged with executing the acts legislated by the council, collecting revenue, and managing the day-to-day functions of the county government.[8][9]

County Officials: The county has several other elected offices, including sheriff, coroner, auditor, treasurer, recorder, surveyor, and circuit court clerk. Each of these elected officers serves a term of four years and oversees a different part of county government. Members elected to county government positions are required to declare party affiliations and to be residents of the county.[9]

Franklin County is part of Indiana's 6th congressional district; Indiana Senate districts 42 and 43;[10] and Indiana House of Representatives districts 55, 67 and 68.[11]

Townships[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 10,763
1830 10,190 −5.3%
1840 13,349 31.0%
1850 17,968 34.6%
1860 19,549 8.8%
1870 20,223 3.4%
1880 20,092 −0.6%
1890 18,366 −8.6%
1900 16,388 −10.8%
1910 15,335 −6.4%
1920 14,806 −3.4%
1930 14,498 −2.1%
1940 14,412 −0.6%
1950 16,034 11.3%
1960 17,015 6.1%
1970 16,943 −0.4%
1980 19,612 15.8%
1990 19,580 −0.2%
2000 22,151 13.1%
2010 23,087 4.2%
Est. 2012 22,969 −0.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]
2012 Estimate[13]

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 22,151 people, 7,868 households, and 6,129 families residing in the county. The population density was 57 people per square mile (22/km²). There were 8,596 housing units at an average density of 22 per square mile (9/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 99.02% White, 0.03% Black or African American, 0.16% Native American, 0.22% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.09% from other races, and 0.47% from two or more races. 0.47% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 46.4% were of German, 19.4% American, 9.2% English and 8.5% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 7,868 households out of which 37.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.00% were married couples living together, 8.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.10% were non-families. 19.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county the population was spread out with 28.10% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 29.20% from 25 to 44, 22.60% from 45 to 64, and 12.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 99.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $43,530, and the median income for a family was $50,171. Males had a median income of $33,998 versus $24,516 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,624. About 4.70% of families and 7.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.90% of those under age 18 and 9.70% of those age 65 or over.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Franklin County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-09-17. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. Retrieved 2011-10-10. 
  4. ^ De Witt Clinton Goodrich & Charles Richard Tuttle (1875). An Illustrated History of the State of Indiana. Indiana: R. S. Peale & co. p. 558. 
  5. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 131. 
  6. ^ Amazing Tales from Indiana, By Fred D., Pg 6–7
  7. ^ a b "Monthly Averages for Brookville, Indiana". The Weather Channel. Retrieved 2011-01-27. 
  8. ^ a b Indiana Code. "Title 36, Article 2, Section 3". IN.gov. Retrieved 2008-09-16. 
  9. ^ a b c Indiana Code. "Title 2, Article 10, Section 2". IN.gov. Retrieved 2008-09-16. 
  10. ^ "Indiana Senate Districts". State of Indiana. Retrieved 2011-01-23. 
  11. ^ "Indiana House Districts". State of Indiana. Retrieved 2011-01-23. 
  12. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Census.gov. Retrieved July 30, 2013. 
  14. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

Coordinates: 39°25′N 85°04′W / 39.42°N 85.06°W / 39.42; -85.06